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It's Not a Race for Last
Joe Kenn  |  General Training  |  September 28 2010

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It's Not a Race for Last, Joe Kenn,

This July, my youngest son Peter was going through his first training camp of organized tackle football and I was very excited. With football, as with most other team sports, practices are pretty much all the same; start off with a warm up, move to position fundamentals, follow with some group/team work, and finish up with conditioning. It was during the conditioning portion of my son’s football practice that I heard one of the greatest motivational lines I’ve heard in my 34 years of playing sports and coaching.

On that humid summer evening, Coach Phillips was running his team of twelve year olds through sprint drills. The sight of those boys running sprint after sprint, arms flailing and heads bobbing, was one that made me laugh. I knew some of them were running for the first time all summer. Coach Phillips probably knew it also because when he noticed several boys lagging he yelled, “It’s not a race for last!"

“It’s not a race for last”…as soon as I heard it, I knew it would be a great line to use down the road. I didn’t want to forget it so I quickly texted it to myself. So, thank you Coach Phillips. I have officially stolen it.

Now, as I watch conditioning drills for my own team, I keep this quote in the back of my mind. I have yet to use it as motivation for my athletes, but try to think about what it actually means to me. I have an idea of what Coach Phillips was trying to get out of his team, but I am looking for something deeper. I continue to evaluate my team as well as the quote. In doing so, I think of past summers with other teams at different universities for a way to define it. I contemplate how to apply it to my athletes, staff and colleagues.

As I look to define It’s not a race for last, let’s examine this scenario: a typical interval conditioning session. Whatever distance you are running, you will have athletes that fall into several categories.

The first one is what I call The Rabbits. These athletes are the ones that set the tempo for the rest of the group. They pride themselves on finishing each rep at the front of the pack. They beat designated goal times.

The next group of athletes is The Back of the Pack group. No matter how hard they try, they will never make the designated goal times because goal times are based on average norms. Some of these athletes may be the fastest on your team in short sprints but on distance intervals, they are cooked. Other athletes are just not meant to run. I have a tremendous amount of respect for these athletes. My goal with these athletes is for them to improve and to bring them closer to the third group that I call The Pace.

Pace Athletes are divided into two types. The first type, are those who perform drills with solid effort but finish slightly behind The Rabbits. The second type, are the newly named It’s Not a Race for Last group. These athletes do just enough to finish the drill and remain invisible. These athletes cross the goal line just as you say, “Time”. They extract just enough energy to “not be called out” but never enough to get them to the next level. They think no one is watching them. Really good coaches have every eye on them because these athletes will get you fired.

The It’s Not a Race for Last group or person can occur on any team, staff or organization in any situation. That is because the simple definition of It’s Not a Race for Last is COMPLACENCY. Every large group working toward a common goal will have individuals who are just trying to get by. They are satisfied with the current situation wanting no more or less. Some don’t see themselves as this type of person. These are the ones who become problem issues. They can’t see why they are asked to give more or step out of their comfort zone. These individuals always have an excuse as to why they can’t do something or why they were late, absent, or missed a deadline. It’s never their fault. When things go bad, they become locker room lawyers. They don’t like to be called out in front of their peers for lack of effort and usually try to bring others down with them. In my world, these athletes may have extreme talent but they lack motivation and are easily distracted. In their minds, they are Ballas who are going to the League. As for me, they think I don’t know what I am talking about. If you get too many of these athletes on one team you are sure to find failure.

So, how do you correct this problem? Whether through recruiting or interviews, make sure you have a process that allows you to evaluate an athlete’s Positive Tangibles. Does he look you in the eye when introductions are made? Does he have a passion in his voice when discussing the possibility of being part of your program? Is there a strong work ethic built into his family makeup? Is being part of a successful venture important to him? Is he willing to evaluate his skills to be the best at his position? Does he have a leadership gene? It’s my opinion leadership is an innate ability that cannot be taught. I have been involved in numerous projects designed to teach leadership skills to student athletes only to find out that leaders already know how to lead. You can give individuals the tools to lead but you cannot get them to operate those tools if they don’t want to.

How do you change the culture of athletes in your organization? You must be willing to judge each athlete individually. Each athlete will have something slightly different that makes them an It’s not a Race for Last athlete. You must be willing to draw out their best qualities. In some cases, it will be easier to assign someone else to work with or supervise them. Having a diverse staff will be to everyone’s benefit. A diverse staff with slightly different personality traits blended to match your overall coaching culture will help you bring out the best in every athlete. Sometimes an It’s Not a Race for Last athlete for you will be a different athlete for one of your staff. Together, you can figure out what motivates the athlete, building and mending the relationship so that the athlete feels you care for him and have his best interests at heart.

Keep the It’s Not a Race for Last athletes engaged in the developmental process. It can be as easy as playing the type of music they like to hear or an incentive program in which they are rewarded. Be open to new ideas and consider numerous ways to motivate them. Good luck and thanks for reading.

Check out Joe Kenn's book The Coach's Strength Training Playbook

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Joe Kenn is the President of Big House Power Competitive Athletic Training, Inc. He has over 20 years of coaching experience on the high school and collegiate levels. He has directed programs at Boise State, Utah, Arizona State, and Louisville. Kenn is a CSCS, a Master Strength and Conditioning Coach and the 2002 NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Professional of the Year. He has authored the highly successful The Coach’s Strength Training Play Book and is a popular clinic speaker. For more on Coach Kenn, please head over to Big House Power Competitive Athletic Training Inc. at www.bighhousepower.com.
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1 Comments
Mike Pratapas 1 | 2013-12-23
As a former coach and college athlete I couldn't agree more with coach Kenn. Ironically, I have seen these exact observations hold true in the business world and if not dealt with effectively, can bring an organization, just like a team, to its knees.
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