Floating Snatch Pull - Exercise Library: Demo Videos, Information & Terminology - Catalyst Athletics Olympic Weightlifting
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Floating Snatch Pull

AKA No-touch snatch pull, hang snatch pull
 
The floating snatch pull is a variation of the snatch pull in which the bar doesn’t return all the way to the floor between reps.  
 
 
Execution
 
The first rep will be the same as a snatch pull. Set your snatch starting position tightly and initiate the lift by pushing with the legs against the floor. Shift your weight back slightly more toward the heels as the bar separates from the floor, and maintain approximately the same back angle until the bar is at mid-thigh. At mid- to upper-thigh, your shoulders should be at least slightly in front of the bar. Accelerate the bar aggressively with violent leg and hip extension, keeping the bar close to the body and allowing it to contact at the hips. The movement should be directly vertically with a focus on extending the body upward, although to maintain balance, it will be leaned back slightly. The arms are not engaged in the movement, but remain relaxed in extension. The shoulders should be shrugged up somewhat after the completion of leg and hip extension to continue the bar’s upward path and allow it to stay against the body. The aggressiveness of the push against the ground should result in the lifter’s heels rising off the floor as the extension is completed. After reaching full extension, return to the starting position under control and bring the plates as close to the floor as possible without allowing them to touch. Begin the next rep from this position, without setting the bar down on the floor.
 
 
Purpose
 
The floating snatch pull is a good exercise to develop pulling strength in the snatch, and emphasize strength in the bottom range of the pull (from the floor to the knee), particularly to train the correct position and posture during that pull.
 
 
Programming
 
Generally the floating snatch pull should be done for 2-5 reps per set anywhere from 80%-110% of the lifter’s best snatch depending on the lifter and how it fits into the program. In any case, the weight should not exceed what the lifter can do with reasonably proper positioning and speed in the final extension and maintenance of the proper position at the bottom in between reps. As a strength exercise, it should be placed toward the end of a workout, but because it also involves some speed and technique, it’s generally best place before more basic strength work like squats.
 
 
Variations
 
The floating snatch pull can be performed standing on a riser to allow the same range of motion that would be possible from the floor, but without the bar ever resting on the floor. The lift can also be done as a snatch high-pull, and a pause can be added in the bottom position.  
 
 
See Also
 
Snatch pull
Floating snatch pull on riser
Floating snatch deadlift








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