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Yael Grauer
06-09-2007, 03:29 PM
I did this on the CF boards a while ago, but just wondering what books everyone is reading now that school is out.

I'm always juggling about ten books, right now they are:

-Good Poems for Hard Times selected by Garrison Keillor (couldn't put it down at the bookstore...it's *awesome*)
-The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky (one of my favorite books of all time, but it is very thick.)
-Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A Heinlein (for a book discussion)
-How to Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci by Michael J Gelb (rereading it again)
-Tea Here Now by Donna Fellman and Lhasha Tizer (it was a gift!)

Other books by my bedside
-Strength Training Anatomy by Frederic Delavier
-Women's Strength Training Anatomy by same
-the Ross Enamait booklets of course
-Immortal Poems of the English Language
-Learning To Look: A Handbook for the Visual Arts

and this other somewhat vapid book I can't admit to reading, but will say it is borrowed

Chris Forbis
06-09-2007, 06:37 PM
Today I just finished The Road to Serfdom by F.A. Hayek (reread). I recently finished Guns, Germs, and Steel by Diamond and The Black Swan by Taleb.

I have a huge slate planned for my summer, summer being the best part of teaching for a living. What I plan to read: The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins, The Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan, Death by Black Hole by Neil deGrasse Tyson, The Iliad by Homer (reread), Catch 22 by Heller (reread), 100 Years of Solitude by Marquez (reread), Blink by Gladwell, The Black Swan by Taleb (reread), Beyond Fear by Bruce Schneier, More Sex is Safer Sex by Landsburg, Candide by Voltaire, The Wisdom of Crowds by Surowiecki, and Don Quixote by Cervantes.

I also plan to start working through the Feynman lectures on physics.

I might be overly ambitious with the volume of these summer reading plans. Better to aim high and miss...

Joe Hart
06-09-2007, 07:24 PM
I finished "How to Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci (Thanks Yael), battling thorugh "Meditations" by Marcus Aurelius. I think I will give "Siddartha" a swing next. I have a big list of books to read.

Jay L Swan
06-09-2007, 07:47 PM
Chris--we appear to read a lot of the same books. Some suggestions for you:

The Blind Watchmaker - Dawkins (read this in conjunction with The Selfish Gene)

The Science of Good and Evil - Michael Shermer

Darwin's Dangerous Idea - Daniel Dennett

I just finished The Black Swan and I too look forward to a reread.

Billy_Brummel
06-09-2007, 09:21 PM
Yael,

As a fellow fan of Brothers Karamozov, might I suggest The Brothers K by David James Duncan. I enjoyed it immensely.

Chris Forbis
06-09-2007, 10:17 PM
I'm also currently reading The Dangerous Book for Boys (Thanks Yael). Such a cool book.

And now I'm going to have to at least investigate reading all these other books (and rereading some Dostoevsky). Maybe my goal should be to have all this reading done by the start of next summer.

Yael Grauer
06-10-2007, 12:35 AM
Chris--I tried to read Guns, Germs and Steel but never made it through... was looking at Blink yesterday--it looks so good!! I decided to read his first book (the name escapes me) before picking that one up. I like Crime and Punishment just as much as Brothers K and it's a lot shorter, btw..

Billy--I'll look for it!

I forgot to say that I'm also reading Sex In Your Garden, which is about the reproductive processes of plants.

Gittit Shwartz
06-10-2007, 02:12 AM
I'm also reading "The Selfish Gene" and "Thinking Like Leonardo".
I recently read the Edge Effect by Eric Braverman and was intrigued. It's about how neurotransmitter deficiencies/imbalances can affect your personality and your life, and some strategies for correcting them (among them nutritional). I would have liked it to be less simplistic and you do get the feeling that the whole book is an advertisement for Dr. B's practice... it was a bestseller... Guess I'll have to do further reading on the subject myself. But I do recommend it for the idea.
Somebody borrowed my "Sleep, Sugar and Survival" before I got a chance to read it... But I have his Science of Sports Training by Thomas Kurz. It has a chapter on coordination that is golden. I work with 3-8yo's doing gymnastics + Capoeira + "coordination development" and I reread this part over and over again.

Scott Kustes
06-10-2007, 05:54 AM
Currently finishing up "Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon" by Daniel Dennett. Next up is "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. I'm planning to pick up "The Blind Watchmaker" and "The Selfish Gene" by Dawkins sometime soon. My Amazon wish list is about 100 books long, so I need to figure out what I'm going to be reading soon.

I've read all 3 of Jared Diamond's books and thoroughly enjoyed them.

Robb Wolf
06-10-2007, 07:44 AM
Bunch-o-smarty-pants!

Great reads. Paul Kayley sent me the Biology of Belief. Really good, very different. I only get to read that while on the loo...otherwise its papers for the book.

fun summer ahead!

Scott Kustes
06-10-2007, 10:43 AM
Oh yes, and I'm taking a break from a book Robb recommended to me: Textbook of Medical Physiology. When I was traveling weekly, that got me some weird looks. I had variations of this conversation at least 10 times:

Curious seatmate: (looks over my shoulder to see a medical diagram) "Wow! What're you reading?"
Me: (closes cover to show them the title)
CS: "Cool...where are you in med school?"
Me: "I'm not. I just read this because I enjoy it."
CS: (Looks at me like I'm a smartass) "Haha...right."
Me: "No really. I'm just reading this for enjoyment. I work with computers for a living."
CS: "Oh...well that's interesting." (looks away from the medical textbook reading weirdo)

I think I'll pick it back up this week when I'm laid up from surgery.

Robert Allison
06-10-2007, 07:11 PM
I decided to read his first book (the name escapes me) before picking that one up.

Galdwell's first book was The Tipping Point, which I enjoyed even more than Blink. His columns for the New Yorker are almost always worth checking out and many of them are archived at www.gladwell.com (http://www.gladwell.com/). James Surowiecki is a colleague of Gladwell's at the New Yorker, and his column is usually great as well (as was The Wisdom of Crowds).

For me, work has been fairly consuming of late, so my reading volume is down a little. For the past few weeks, I have been reading Making Waves by Roger Lewin and re-reading Starting Strength and Lights Out.

I have also been reading bits and pieces of the following:


Spiral Dynamics (Cowan & Beck)
The Future of the Body (Michael Murphy)
A Brief History of Everything (Ken Wilber)
The 4-Hour Workweek (Tim Ferrris)
The Seven Storey Mountain (Thomas Merton)


I learned about Taleb's work via an old article I recently stumbled across on Gladwell's site, and I have been reading through the stuff on fooledbyrandomness.com (http://www.fooledbyrandomness.com/). I hope to read both Black Swan and Fooled By Randomness in the near future.

Billy_Brummel
06-10-2007, 08:56 PM
Just got finished reading The Way of the Heart by Henri Nouwen. Covered a lot of the same ground as Merton's Wisdom of the Desert (I think that was the title.) I've been trying to get around to finishing A Generous Orthodoxy by Brian McLaren.

-Ross Hunt
06-10-2007, 09:10 PM
Right now I am mostly reading a bunch of Aquinas and assorted commentaries on Aquinas. On Being and Essence is on of the hardest 30-40 page books I have ever come across... :confused:


I recently skimmed Al Gore's "Assault On Reason." I am not particularly interested in some of his other work ("Inconvenient Truth," e.g.), but this book clearly delineates most of the problems in American politics today, with more of an eye towards solving them rather than towards blaming people for them.

-Ross Hunt
06-10-2007, 09:12 PM
Next up is "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand.



[Darth Vader voice on] NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!! [Darth vader voice off] ;)

I said the same words you just typed once.

And I can never get that month of reading time back.

Pierre Auge
06-10-2007, 10:41 PM
You guys can read? Like English? Geeze I'm way behind the times...

Josh Whiting
06-11-2007, 02:31 AM
I am reading The Last Wrestler, A Far-flung Journey In Search Of The Manly Art by Marcus Trower. It's a true story of an Englishmen and his search for real wrestling. Very funny so far as he places advert for training partners and is only contacted by members of the gay/S&M community who specialise in things such as "working from the rear position".

Current toilet fodder is Keys to Progress and Fear and Loathing in America.

Allen Yeh
06-11-2007, 05:09 AM
Just finished:
Blood Bound by Patricia Briggs
Moon Called by Patricia Briggs
Ravens Shadow by Patricia Briggs

Now Reading:
Ravens Strike by Patricia Briggs
Idiots Guide to Grilling
Tao of Jeet Kune Do by Bruce Lee

Referring to ever few days or so:
Core Performance Endurance by Mark Vestergen
Core Performance Essentials by Mark Vestergen

Scott Kustes
06-11-2007, 05:36 AM
[Darth Vader voice on] NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!! [Darth vader voice off] ;)

I said the same words you just typed once.

And I can never get that month of reading time back.
Not a fan of Rand or just not a good book? I enjoyed The Fountainhead and Anthem.

John Vernon
06-11-2007, 06:16 AM
just finished: Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield (about the 4th time I've read this, way better than the movie 300)
currently reading: From Beirut to Jerusalem by Thomas L. Friedman

Robert Allison
06-11-2007, 06:49 AM
Not a fan of Rand or just not a good book? I enjoyed The Fountainhead and Anthem.

I read Atlas Shrugged, and just about everything else Rand ever wrote; this obviously being in my hardcore libertarian / objectivist phase. While I thought objectivism had some interesting ideas, I ultimately found it lacking as substantive life foundation. But that's just me...

IMO, her works of fiction have some difficulty standing on their own merits; they were more vehicles for articulating a philosophical vision. In my experience, most people who are huge fans of her novels (myself included at one point) are those who are enamored with her worldview. In hindsight, I found that her novels really aren't particular impressive, in terms of plot, character development, etc.

But again, YMMV.

Neal Winkler
06-11-2007, 07:45 AM
Now: The 4-hour Work Week by Ferriss

Up Next:

The Black Swan by Taleb
Parallel Worlds by Michio Kaku
Mixed Martial Arts Book of Knowledge by BJ Penn
Pain Free by Pete Egoscue

Dave Van Skike
06-11-2007, 09:20 AM
Read Freakanomics on Saturday.

Working my way through the The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene and Joost Elffers.

always reading:

Renovating Old Houses by George Nash

and....

Crabgrass Frontier

Josh Whiting
06-11-2007, 03:13 PM
Neil,

What is you opinion on the Four Hour Work Week?

Neal Winkler
06-11-2007, 04:42 PM
I just finished it today, and I loved it because it summed up many of my own philosophies on life. I've been saying for a few years now that my goal in life is to work as little as I possibly can (not so I can be lazy but because I believe work is bad thing for those people who aren't working in a job that truley fullfills them). Before I never had a blueprint on how this can be done, but now I do.

If you've actually got the guts to seek out a lifestyle that gives you free-time and mobility then the book is a great place to start to get ideas on how to do it.

Another interesting thing is that I started reading the Black Swan today and in both books they discuss the idea of jobs that are "scalable." An example of a scalable job might be a musician recording a CD - he records it once and therefore does the same amount of work whether he sells 10 copies or a million. But a non-scalable job is one where the output is proportional to the input. An example would be a job where you're paid by the hour (like a cashier) - the money you make is directly proportional to the number of hours you put in. A quality vs. quantity issue.

Ferriss says that you have to have a scalable job if you want time and mobility, but it's funny because in The Black Swan Taleb advises AGAINST scalable jobs because they are more risky/uncertain. Ferriss says that fear of risk is why these types of jobs have less competition.

Dan Silver
06-11-2007, 04:55 PM
Still to be read for the week:
Marvel Zombies vs. Army of Darkness #4
Countdown, Weeks 47 and 48
The Lone Ranger #6
Daredevil: Battlin' Jack Murdock #1
Battlestar Galactica #10
Freshmen: Volume 2 #4
Batman #665
The All New Atom #12
Detective Comics #833
Uncanny X-Men #487

Book in progress:
Dearly Devoted Dexter by Jeff Lindsay

-D.

Mike ODonnell
06-11-2007, 05:15 PM
The Science of Getting Rich - Financial Success through creative thought
The Power of Now - Guide to spiritual enlightenment
The Shaolin Way - Modern secrets of survival from a shaolin grandmaster

The 4 hour work week sounds good.....since I already work for myself, always good to find ways to make more and work less....

Catherine Imes
06-11-2007, 05:25 PM
I'm also reading-rereading "The Science of Getting Rich";

As far as fiction; "Never Let Me go"

Joe Hart
06-11-2007, 05:31 PM
Dan,

Seeing that you are reading comics. Nothing wrong with that I am partial to Lobo, The Maxx, and Pitt. Does the new Fantastic Four give you a feeling foreboding, because they are going to screw up the Silver Surfer and Galactus stories?

I am looking for a Sci Fi book in the William Gibson cyberpunk vein, anyone have some suggestions. I have already read "Snowcrash".

Yael Grauer
06-11-2007, 05:35 PM
Sandman #50!

I'm also partial to all the indie comics: Hate (r.i.p.), Neat Stuff, Apocalypse Nerd, Eightball, Dork, Optic Nerve, Action Girl, Meatcake, Naughty Bits, Love and Rockets, Milk and Cheese (sorry Robb, it's not paleo), etc.

Elliot Royce
06-11-2007, 06:11 PM
Amazing to see no politics mentioned....that's why we all get along so well.

Chris Forbis
06-11-2007, 06:45 PM
Amazing to see no politics mentioned....that's why we all get along so well.

Why would I want to read books about politics when I could read something interesting?

Steve Shafley
06-11-2007, 07:54 PM
Joe Hart:

"Burning Chrome" by William Gibson is the required reading for his short stories. My favorite short story of his "Red Star, Winter Orbit" is in here.

Walter John Williams: "Hardwired", "Reap the Whirlwind" and "Angel Station" will be nice additions to your cyberpunk material.

Bruce Sterling: "The Schizmatrix" and "The Artificial Kid"

I'm trying to think of some others..."Farewell Horizontal" by KW Jeter was pretty interesting.

New stuff by Richard Morgan in his Takeshi Kovacs series: "Altered Carbon", "Broken Angels" (this one is, in my opinion, the best so far) and "Woken Furies"

Joe Hart
06-11-2007, 08:15 PM
Steve,

Thanks for recommendations. Did it seem like William Gibson wrote "All Tommorrows Parties" to get people off his back? I was chomping at the bit to read that book and then when I did it just irked me.

Yael,

If you are giving Heinlein a read try "Glory Road" and "JOB: Comedy of Justice". They are petty funny. I have read "Starship Trooper" maybe 12 times, so I guess I like it. I have one copy that I loan people and one that my brother gave me that I keep. I find it interesting that it was first printed in 1959. It seems considrably more modern.

Mike ODonnell
06-11-2007, 08:49 PM
Inspired by this thread....sold the 50" TV today....dont need it....will go the summer with no tv and see what happens....plus always said that if I wanted to I could go get a new plasma for the wall....but really wondering why I would need it other than for DVDs?? We shall see where it takes me.....

Dan Silver
06-11-2007, 09:27 PM
Dan,

Seeing that you are reading comics. Nothing wrong with that I am partial to Lobo, The Maxx, and Pitt. Does the new Fantastic Four give you a feeling foreboding, because they are going to screw up the Silver Surfer and Galactus stories?

I am looking for a Sci Fi book in the William Gibson cyberpunk vein, anyone have some suggestions. I have already read "Snowcrash".

Joe,

Did you already read the other Neal Stephenson stuff? The Diamond Age and Cryptonomicon are my faves. Plus, Cryptonomicon is one of the longest books ever written, so you feel like a vast intellectual when you finish it.

If you're into comics and Cyberpunk - and haven't yet by some strange, cruel twist of fate - read Akira... don't pass "go" until you do. It's probably the longest single-story graphic novel collection ever, so you'll feel like King Dork when you finish it.

And yes, Hollywood will rape the Silver Surfer like a cabin boy on the H.M.S. Sodomizer. The early fanboy reports indicate that Galacticus - Destroyer of Worlds; God of Gods - is portrayed in the film as a big cloud... wow. A cloud.

Rad.

-D.

Allen Yeh
06-12-2007, 04:06 AM
And yes, Hollywood will rape the Silver Surfer like a cabin boy on the H.M.S. Sodomizer. The early fanboy reports indicate that Galacticus - Destroyer of Worlds; God of Gods - is portrayed in the film as a big cloud... wow. A cloud.

Rad.

-D.


A cloud????? My brain melted just now....

John Alston
06-12-2007, 06:09 AM
Today I just finished The Road to Serfdom by F.A. Hayek (reread). I recently finished Guns, Germs, and Steel by Diamond...
Wow, those were the last two I finished!

Now I am reading The Possability of an Island, by Michel Houllebecq.
By the bed for flipping is the Weightlifting Encyclopedia by Artie Drescher.

John Alston
06-12-2007, 06:11 AM
Yael,

As a fellow fan of Brothers Karamozov, might I suggest The Brothers K by David James Duncan. I enjoyed it immensely.

I'll second the Brothers K...

Dave Van Skike
06-12-2007, 08:42 AM
Wow, those were the last two I finished!

Now I am reading The Possability of an Island, by Michel Houllebecq.
By the bed for flipping is the Weightlifting Encyclopedia by Artie Drescher.

If you liked guns germs .....pick up a copy of Plagues and Peoples. Much more in depth read tracking the spread of major plagues in chronology with rise and fall of the great eastern and western empires. Less PC and less schlocky conclusions than GGS.

-Ross Hunt
06-12-2007, 12:08 PM
Not a fan of Rand or just not a good book? I enjoyed The Fountainhead and Anthem.

I haven't read those books; maybe they're better. I gave Atlas Shrugged a good, serious read, and I wasn't impressed. As a philosopher, Ayn Rand is mostly concerned with confronting peculiar types of what Nietzsche referred to as nihilism. She draws heavily from his criticism of nihilism (whether she realizes it or not), without realizing one of Nietzsche's most important insights--the fact that nihilism is a fait accompli, a done deal, irreversible. Also, she adopts Nietzsche's rhetoric of master morality and slave morality in earnest, sharing his criticism of socialists and communists while opposing them to independent business men whom Nietzsche would regard as equally slavish. Finally, criticizes socialism, etcetera, as irrational, again following Nietzsche in the substance and style of her argument, but she does not realize that this argument only really makes sense if you acknowledge that the alternative, or at least the political alternative, is equally ungrounded in reason.

I don't mean to be a jerk by writing the argument out in this very assertive fashion; I'm just trying to make it appropriately short.

Also, her books are just so REPETITIVE! :D But that's really a matter of taste.

John Vernon
06-12-2007, 12:54 PM
Inspired by this thread....sold the 50" TV today....dont need it....will go the summer with no tv and see what happens....plus always said that if I wanted to I could go get a new plasma for the wall....but really wondering why I would need it other than for DVDs?? We shall see where it takes me.....

i've been sans tv for the last several months and finally picked up a nice little 30" & dvd player. no cable though, i just got sick and tired of watching dvd's on my laptop...after watching my first dvd on the new tube i feel like a dope watching it on my laptop these past months. i really like not having cable, much less time wasted in front of the tv. forces me to be a bit more social and head out to catch any MMA that i can't live without.

Steve Shafley
06-12-2007, 07:22 PM
Ug.

You people read too much non-fiction. And, when Ayn Rand is brought up seriously, I start to look around for a place where I can bar the doors and light the building on fire.

Non-fiction for me:

Practical Programming
The 4-Hour Work Week (interesting)
The Starbucks Experience (can't bring myself to start this)
The Anatomy of Hatha Yoga (or something...really comprehensive)
Freakonomics (a while back. fast, fun, and interesting...one of the better books I've read this year)

Some book on the history of testosterone use, which bored the hell out of me, and was pretty crappy.

The other book by the guy who wrote fast food nation about Marijuana, Migrant workers, and some other topic so important to me I forgot about it.

David Wood
06-12-2007, 07:52 PM
Second the vote for "plagues & peoples" . . . great book.

Lots of great histories out there . . . on religion, anything by Karen Armstrong or Elaine Pagels.

Actually reading now: "Life of Pi", "Ishmael", and "Awareness: the Pleasures and Perils of Reality".

Mike ODonnell
06-12-2007, 08:15 PM
i've been sans tv for the last several months and finally picked up a nice little 30" & dvd player. no cable though, i just got sick and tired of watching dvd's on my laptop...after watching my first dvd on the new tube i feel like a dope watching it on my laptop these past months. i really like not having cable, much less time wasted in front of the tv. forces me to be a bit more social and head out to catch any MMA that i can't live without.

Social experiment gone horribly wrong....called guy up who I told I would sell TV to...cancelled the order...realized I was stupid for thinking otherwise....I went bat ass crazy trying to go to sleep in the last few nights....I need the TV to lull me to sleep....helps slows down my brain....although I did force myself to realize...the TV is expendible...I wont watch it during the day or when I should be out doing stuff....and it is fun and enjoyable in small controlled doses...actually helps me to focus more just being on in the background and gets me to sleep faster if I can wind down with it....weird....

Yael Grauer
06-12-2007, 08:21 PM
I have a teeny tiny television, but I like it because I'm one of those weird people that still has a VCR.

John Vernon
06-12-2007, 09:12 PM
I went bat ass crazy trying to go to sleep in the last few nights....I need the TV to lull me to sleep....helps slows down my brain

I haven't made it through a whole movie yet without dozing off...trying again tonight.

Jamila Bey
06-12-2007, 10:43 PM
4 Hour Workweek ROCKS!!!

If Lavar Burton came out with a show for me, it would be called "Reading Rehab!" I go thru at least 2 books a week... Mostly history and biographies so far. But I'm a total Chris Hitchens groupie, so I just finished his latest, "God is not Great." He's so literary and contrarian... Hitchens is dreamy!

I have on my nightstand some anti-procrastination books that I've been meaning to read...

Josh Whiting
06-13-2007, 03:13 AM
Post research: Tom Ferriss is the "From Geek To Freek" transformation guy and (I think) also the man behind body/mindquicken.

http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2007/04/29/from-geek-to-freak-how-i-gained-34-lbs-of-muscle-in-4-weeks/

He likes HIT, but you can't have everything I suppose.

Steve Shafley
06-13-2007, 06:13 AM
It's extremely likely he had the same "assistance" that Casey Viator had during the original Colorado Experiment.

Josh Whiting
06-13-2007, 07:01 AM
Forced Reps?

Robert Allison
06-13-2007, 10:32 AM
Post research: Tom Ferriss is the "From Geek To Freek" transformation guy and (I think) also the man behind body/mindquicken.

http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2007/04/29/from-geek-to-freak-how-i-gained-34-lbs-of-muscle-in-4-weeks/

He likes HIT, but you can't have everything I suppose.

Yep, Ferriss is the guy behind Brain Quicken... he uses it as one of his "case studies" in The 4-Hour Workweek. He also apparently won a kickboxing championship in China, but not because he was particularly skilled. In the book, he talks about cutting about 20 lbs of weight, then putting it back on after weigh-in. While that may be standard practice (at least here in the States) for combat sports, I guess his opponents weren't really used to that sort of strategy. Even then, he got most of his points by pushing his opponents out of the ring.

I am pretty sure that is not in keeping with the spirit of the sport, but it does communicate his williingness to think outside of the box.

Great book... definitely worth reading.

Scott Kustes
06-13-2007, 06:36 PM
Skipped Atlas Shrugged as I wasn't interested in an 1100 page book. Moved on to Bourne Ultimautm...a bit lighter. I'll get to Rand about the time I get to Count of Monte Christo...in a long time.

-Ross Hunt
06-13-2007, 07:01 PM
Skipped Atlas Shrugged as I wasn't interested in an 1100 page book. Moved on to Bourne Ultimautm...a bit lighter. I'll get to Rand about the time I get to Count of Monte Christo...in a long time.

My work here is done. ;)

Monte Christo is a fun book. The first great prison escape story, as far as I know--digging through a wall with a spoon and everything.

Chris Forbis
06-14-2007, 12:34 AM
My work here is done. ;)

Monte Christo is a fun book. The first great prison escape story, as far as I know--digging through a wall with a spoon and everything.

Dude, The Count is such an awesome book... vastly superior to Atlas.

Josh Whiting
06-14-2007, 02:21 AM
I think I might read The Count. Papillon is one of my all time favorite books.

James R. Climer
06-14-2007, 04:49 PM
Political: Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns-Goodwin

Fiction: The Innocent Man by John Grisham
Ordinary Heroes by Scott Turow

NF: Muscle Logicby Charles Staley

Just finished Blink, The Tipping Point, and Bonnie Prudden's Exercise & Fitness Over 50

Interestingly, the Bonnie Prudden book showed how to find & release trigger points in my right foot that erased the Plantar Fascia pain right before I ran the Bay to Breakers in SanFran on May 20, and the condition is now gone after about 2 years of irritation.

Chuck Kechter
06-14-2007, 06:29 PM
Loved Blink, Tipping Point... Give Props to The Black Swan. I am 50 or so pages from being done with it...

I am also reading Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene. I just finished the chapter on quantum mechanics... which was good in a brain-hurty sort of way...

I also liked What We Believe But Cannot Prove Edited by John Brockman, Deep Survival by Laurence Gonzales, The End of Faith by Sam Harris, Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, Living with the Devil by Stephen Batchelor, Almost anything by Daniel Quinn (although I thought the Holy was pretty weak)...

For Fiction I've been reading Requiem for the Assassin by Barry Eisler, Bad Luck and Trouble by Lee Child, Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay, Vellum by Hal Duncan (one of the best books I've read in the last year), Ink (the sequel) also by Duncan...

For training related I only read Ross Enamait's books...

Good stuff!

Jesse Woody
06-14-2007, 06:36 PM
"The God Delusion" By Richard Dawkins (great read), and "Near the End of Time" by John Updike, one of my favorite authors.

I was thoroughly disappointed by Atlas Shrugged, though The Fountainhead is definitely one of my favorite books of all time.

Jesse Woody
06-14-2007, 08:14 PM
"The God Delusion" By Richard Dawkins (great read), and "Near the End of Time" by John Updike, one of my favorite authors.

I was thoroughly disappointed by Atlas Shrugged, though The Fountainhead is definitely one of my favorite books of all time.

Woops, that should be "Toward the end of Time" :p

kevin mckay
06-14-2007, 09:13 PM
Cryptinomicon by Neal Stephenson

Yael Grauer
06-14-2007, 09:22 PM
Cryptinomicon by Neal Stephenson

What did you do to Curious George?

Allen Yeh
06-14-2007, 09:33 PM
What did you do to Curious George?

roofies?

kevin mckay
06-14-2007, 10:26 PM
Ether, if you look closely you can see it on his little bottle.

Yael Grauer
06-14-2007, 10:27 PM
Ether, if you look closely you can see it on his little bottle.

And here I thought everything was made of ether.

kevin mckay
06-14-2007, 10:44 PM
Ha!

I actually read curios George every night to my 4yo son.
CG gets a little tedious after a while I much prefer "frog and toad are friends" and "where the wild things are"

if I need to read "Thomas the fucking train again I may go postal" :)

Mark Bennett
06-15-2007, 05:53 AM
Just finished:-

How to Eat, Move and be Healthy by Paul Chek
&
Gene by Stel Pavlou

Starting:-

Athletic Body in Balance by Gray Cook
&
The Shot by Philip Kerr

Steve Shafley
06-15-2007, 06:15 AM
I read a lot of books to my daughter.

I like the positive female role models Cornelia Funke provides in her childrens books "The Princess Knight", "Pirate Girl", and "The Strongest Brother" (or something like that).

Dr. Seuss and Oliver Dunrea are also favorites of the small one.

Dave Van Skike
06-15-2007, 09:33 AM
For those with really young kids, 2-4, I like

Mr. Gumpy's Outing (http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Gumpys-Outing-John-Burningham/dp/0805013156). Like all good childrens' books it's a morality tale on the dangers of hubris..and it ends with a tea party.

Joe Hart
06-15-2007, 08:10 PM
Yael,

George was busy screwing around in an apartment and the mob came to beat his ass and he jumped off the fire escape and broke his leg. That sent him to hospital for a cast. When they took the cast off he knocked his own ass out with some ether. The doc tossed him in a cold shower to wake him up. In the mean time the Man with the Yellow Hat has been looking high and low for George's dumb ass. He sees a newspaper article about a monkey that has run amok and goes to hospital just in time for the soaking of George. When TMINTYH gets George home he beats his ass like a drum. The End.

That is the version I would love to read to my kids after about the 10th time, but I don't.

I am a huge Neil Gaiman fan. I like the way British write. Their command of the English language is so entertaining.

Yael Grauer
06-15-2007, 10:34 PM
I like the way Jeanette Winterson writes. Magical realism.

Though I love Sandman #50.

Joe Hart
06-17-2007, 08:08 PM
I just finished "Siddartha" and started "Blink". "Siddartha" was one of those books on the must read to go to college list so I read it. It was okay but I can't say that it was earth shattering. My cousin has read it 5 times, but them again I think she might be a closet tree hugger, not that there is anything wrong with that. I could have missed the important part in "Siddartha" or not realized the important part. I read 'Starship Trooper" 12 times so I could have missed the good parts of "Siddartha"

Dan Silver
06-18-2007, 07:01 AM
Cryptinomicon by Neal Stephenson
Send my regards to Mr. Shaftoe.

-D.

Scott Kustes
06-18-2007, 07:19 AM
Since I nearly finished The Bourne Ultimatum this weekend, I just ordered 4 more books:
- The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates
- The End of Food: How the Food Industry is Destroying Our Food Supply--And What We Can Do About It by Thomas Pawlick
- The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan
- Plagues and People's by William McNeill

Mark Gebhard
06-18-2007, 08:01 AM
I'm currently reading -
The World According to Garp
Plutarch's Lives
The Road to Reality (this one will knock you on your ass, and I'm not even to the physics yet)

Ron Nelson
06-18-2007, 08:33 AM
Just started Amerika by Franz Kafka.

I've gots to get me some smarts.

Derek Simonds
06-18-2007, 09:39 AM
Just got caught up on this thread. Here are a couple of books I have read recently

Non Fiction
Becoming a Category of One Joe Calloway
http://www.joecalloway.com/bookexcerpt.htm

The Power of Full Engagement
http://www.energyforperformance.com/book_PFE.html

S.C.O.R.E. for Life (R) : The Secret Formula for Thinking Like a Champion
http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780060823252/SCORE_for_Life_R/index.aspx

Mind Hacks : Tips & Tricks for Using Your Brain (Hacks)
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/mindhks/

Fiction
Pattern Recognition William Gibson
http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/books/pattern.asp

I second anything by Neil Gaimon or Stephenson. For fun, light satirical reading you absolutely cannot go wrong with Terry Pratchett, his Discworld series is fantastic. I have been reading my way backwards through the series for a couple of years now.

http://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/

My second favorite genre is Florida Crime. I highly reccomend Carl Hiassen or Tim Dorsey.

http://www.carlhiaasen.com/
http://timdorsey.com/home.html

Dan Silver
06-19-2007, 12:01 AM
A cloud????? My brain melted just now....
Just saw the new FF flick. As expected, I actually think I'm dumber for having watched it. So, so, so, so, so, so, so bad. In fact, I'm now going to write about how much I hated it and post said writing on my website.

Not sure why I called Galactus "Galacticus" in my first post there, by the way. Perhaps I'm slipping as I grow in years.

-D.

Paul Kayley
06-19-2007, 05:34 AM
Just read:
The Biology Of Belief: Unleashing The Power Of Consciousness, Matter And Miracles by Bruce Lipton

Changed my views in a number of fundamental areas

Highly recommended book. Check out other reviews here...
http://www.amazon.com/Biology-Belief-Unleashing-Consciousness-Miracles/dp/0975991477/ref=pd_sim_b_1_img/105-1027740-1446806

Just reread:

Biochemistry of Exercise and Training (Oxford Medical Publications)
by Ron J. Maughan (Author), Michael Gleeson (Author), Paul L. Greenhaff (Author)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Biochemistry-Exercise-Training-Medical-Publications/dp/0192627414/ref=sr_1_2/202-5035350-9360613?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182255586&sr=8-2

Very very good book... worth every penny.

About to read:

The Cosmic Code by Heinz R. Pagels
An introduction to quantum mechanics

Derek Simonds
06-19-2007, 07:05 AM
Sitting in my office I saw two other fiction titles that I have recently read and enjoyed.

Jackknife
http://www.jackknifethebook.com/home.html
The protagonist is a female time traveler who ends up dealing with Jack the Ripper. Very good.

The Travelers
http://www.randomhouse.com/features/traveler/
Another fun sci-fi read.

Robb Wolf
06-20-2007, 04:51 PM
Paul sent me his copy of Biology of Belief...super interesting.

Nicki Is readign the 4hr work week...looks good.

Starting "Lone Survivor". Not going to be up-lifting.

R. Alan Hester
06-20-2007, 06:34 PM
Starting "Lone Survivor". Not going to be up-lifting.

Robb,

I am reading this as well. We went through a portion of training together some years ago. He is a super guy with a big heart. I saw his interview on the Today Show some days back--heart wrenching. I hope he was allowed to disclose as much as the official reports documented some years back; we shall see.

I am also reading “On Combat.” It deals with the physiological and psychological aspects of human aggression in a self-defense/combat situation. My favorite part is the section dealing with pooping and pissing on one’s self in those situations. As it asserts, when the human body senses a life threatening situation, it dumps all useless matter that resides in the lower intestines. In WWII, for instance, over 50% of veterans admitted soiling their pants during combat ops, while accusing the other 50% of lying.

Yael Grauer
06-20-2007, 06:42 PM
I am also reading “On Combat.” It deals with the physiological and psychological aspects of human aggression in a self-defense/combat situation.

That's a great book.

R. Alan Hester
06-20-2007, 06:48 PM
That's a great book.

It is so far. I find this type of reading very useful for my (side) job. I train military medics preparing to deploy to the sandbox and try to ground all of my teaching techniques in a philosophy based on this type of work. That is to say, the human body is going to react a certain way in stressful situations, although the degree varies. Therefore, systemization of patient care based on GROSS MOTOR movements is key, at least initially, while the medic is in the “black.” After the medic is no longer tweaking, more refined, fine motor movement based treatments can be completed.

The human body is amazing.

Yael Grauer
06-20-2007, 07:02 PM
You know, it's interesting because I've read On Combat and books like it and thought I really had a handle on what happens, at least in the theoretical sense. But then I was calling a friend of mine on some, uh, erratic behavior and he pointed out to me that he's recently seen friends die, he recently had to kill someone... And suddenly everything made sense... I wonder how many people don't realize and never find out.

Check out Blauer's stuff if you haven't already.

It is so far. I find this type of reading very useful for my (side) job. I train military medics preparing to deploy to the sandbox and try to ground all of my teaching techniques in a philosophy based on this type of work. That is to say, the human body is going to react a certain way in stressful situations, although the degree varies. Therefore, systemization of patient care based on GROSS MOTOR movements is key, at least initially, while the medic is in the “black.” After the medic is no longer tweaking, more refined, fine motor movement based treatments can be completed.

The human body is amazing.

Steve Shafley
06-20-2007, 08:38 PM
It's funny, the author of "On Combat" co-wrote a sci fi book that I read and included a whole lot of his philosophies on combat in the context of the book...very interesting and the book was entertaining on top of it.

Josh Whiting
06-21-2007, 02:19 AM
"Acts Of War" by Richard Holmes is an outstanding book if you are interested in the human/psychological element of armed conflict.

Yael Grauer
06-21-2007, 07:56 AM
Trauma and Recovery is a really good book too.

Matt Cricchio
06-21-2007, 01:24 PM
"Lone Survivor" is excellent. I am almost finished with "The Shia Revival" by Vali Nasr. I want to finally finish "The Quark and the Jaguar" by Murray Gell-Mann when I am done with that.

Robb Wolf
06-21-2007, 05:19 PM
Robb,

I am reading this as well. We went through a portion of training together some years ago. He is a super guy with a big heart. I saw his interview on the Today Show some days back--heart wrenching. I hope he was allowed to disclose as much as the official reports documented some years back; we shall see.

I am also reading “On Combat.” It deals with the physiological and psychological aspects of human aggression in a self-defense/combat situation. My favorite part is the section dealing with pooping and pissing on one’s self in those situations. As it asserts, when the human body senses a life threatening situation, it dumps all useless matter that resides in the lower intestines. In WWII, for instance, over 50% of veterans admitted soiling their pants during combat ops, while accusing the other 50% of lying.

I am bracing myself...the anniversary of the event is upon us and one of our trainers is a Widow of one of the lost SEALS. I can not even fathom...

Josh Whiting
06-22-2007, 08:33 AM
Yael,

That book does look interesting. I imagine Herman has quite a unique slant on things.

Neal Winkler
06-22-2007, 09:28 AM
Would anyone recommend the "On Combat" book to MMA fighters, or is it just useful for military/LEO?

Mike ODonnell
06-22-2007, 11:30 AM
100 pages into 4 hour workweek and it's right on target for my goals....love it so far....most people probably will think it is extreme...then again I retired 5 years ago from the status quo american worker corporate machine...so pretty much what I was looking for...

Yael Grauer
06-22-2007, 02:07 PM
Would anyone recommend the "On Combat" book to MMA fighters, or is it just useful for military/LEO?

It is about perceptual disturbances that take place in combat, how people deal with the toxic environment, etc. I found it fascinating and I am neither military nor LE. But it's not really about competition fighting per se.

Joe Hart
06-22-2007, 02:09 PM
Any other books out, other than the ones mentioned, about the psychology of combat/confrontatioins? Right at the moment I am reading about Raptors in MN.

Yael- Are you still coming out to MN in July? The weather has really been crappy (hot and humid).

Yael Grauer
06-22-2007, 02:26 PM
Joe, everything's kind of up in the air as I'm probably qutting my job before the conference they want to send me to. So then I'll have to see if I can buy the ticket off them (it's nontransferable), but I may have to change the dates depending on when the new job starts. I'm kinda juggling potential job offers and real job offers for teaching in the fall right now... I'll keep you posted though!

As far as books on combat/confrontations, I've heard good things about
Emotional Survival for Law Enforcement by Kevin M. Gilmartin. I've heard the names Alexis Artwohl and David Klinger thrown around. Also check out Tony Blauer's videos and audio tapes if at all possible. He's a rock star.

Jay L Swan
06-23-2007, 01:50 PM
I haven't read "On Combat", but there are some serious problems with Grossman's other book, "On Killing". For one critique see this:

http://www.theppsc.org/Grossman/SLA_Marshall/Main.htm

One of the best and most practical books out there on the mental/psychological aspects of combat is "Training and Leadership for the Fight", by Paul Howe. Howe spent most of his career at the very top levels of US Army special operations.

If one wants a more academic, women's self-defense perspective, another one that few people seem to know about is "Real Knockouts: The Physical Feminism of Women's Self Defense" by Martha McCaughey.

For a criminal psychology perspective on the bad guys, "Inside the Criminal Mind" by Stanton Samenow is pretty good.

For evolutionary perspectives on evil behavior, consider "The Science of Good and Evil" by Michael Shermer and "The Dark Side of Man" by Michael Ghiglieri. There are a bunch of interesting evolutionary psychology books out on this topic now, but I'd say these two are going to be among the most interesting for the folks here.

Yael Grauer
06-23-2007, 02:33 PM
Another page from the same critic:
http://pages.slc.edu/~fsmoler/grossman.html

I didn't like On Killing nearly as much as On Combat and I question the assumptions as well, but some of the critic's assumptions are inaccurate too... Like when he said crossbows couldn't penetrate armor back then and that's why they switched to guns. Not true. Only shields could stop arrows and bolts. Even longbow arrows could penetrate.

Oh, and I just remembered about a book called Mindhunter:Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit by John Douglas. Robert K Ressler also writes similar books.

And as far as WSD, I've read Real Knockouts but there's also Beauty Bites Beast: Awakening the Warrior Within Women and Girls.

Also Gavin DeBecker's books are interesting, though pretty basic.

Glad this thread is still going.

I'm going to buy Trail Guide to the Body.

Jay L Swan
06-23-2007, 03:01 PM
Yael, just to clarify: I don't believe the two Grossman critiques are by the same person. The one I posted is by Tom Aveni; the one you posted is by Frederic Smoler.

"Mindhunter" is downright scary.

Yael Grauer
06-23-2007, 03:33 PM
Yael, just to clarify: I don't believe the two Grossman critiques are by the same person. The one I posted is by Tom Aveni; the one you posted is by Frederic Smoler.

My bad. I skimmed it, saw "Marshall" and assumed.

"Mindhunter" is downright scary.

Yes. I stopped reading books like that a while ago. I'm glad that there are other people that study criminal profiles, however.

The movie Manhunter gave me awful nightmares too... *shudder*

Joe Hart
06-23-2007, 03:37 PM
I liked "Mindhunter", but the follow up book (I forget its name) was pretty lame. Then again I read it quite a while ago and my general outlook has changed, so maybe it isn't as lame. Nice waffle there. Started "Lights Out" since my wife has commandiered "Blink".

Chris Forbis
06-23-2007, 04:00 PM
I just finished re-reading Einstein's Dreams. It's a fictional novel by a theoretical physics PhD that is a professor of humanities at MIT.

It's set in 1905 and follows Einstein as he is working on his theory of relativity. It is basically 30 different imaginings of how time might work. About 3-5 pages for each. Whole book is less than 150 pages. Highly recommended (by me).

http://www.amazon.com/Einsteins-Dreams-Alan-Lightman/dp/140007780X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-7133051-5394360?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182639547&sr=8-1

R. Alan Hester
06-23-2007, 05:43 PM
I haven't read "On Combat", but there are some serious problems with Grossman's other book, "On Killing". For one critique see this:

http://www.theppsc.org/Grossman/SLA_Marshall/Main.htm

One of the best and most practical books out there on the mental/psychological aspects of combat is "Training and Leadership for the Fight", by Paul Howe. Howe spent most of his career at the very top levels of US Army special operations.

If one wants a more academic, women's self-defense perspective, another one that few people seem to know about is "Real Knockouts: The Physical Feminism of Women's Self Defense" by Martha McCaughey.

For a criminal psychology perspective on the bad guys, "Inside the Criminal Mind" by Stanton Samenow is pretty good.

For evolutionary perspectives on evil behavior, consider "The Science of Good and Evil" by Michael Shermer and "The Dark Side of Man" by Michael Ghiglieri. There are a bunch of interesting evolutionary psychology books out on this topic now, but I'd say these two are going to be among the most interesting for the folks here.

I will read some of the books you suggested. Having just finished "On Combat," I do agree that Grossman comes to some odd conclusions. His use of the "broad brush" to explain such things as posturing on the battles field and noise of weapons when discussing the dominance of the so-called "Western Civilization" is a bit much—he sounds as if he was parroting Victor Davis Hanson. Many academics (most of whom I have come to despise while pursuing my MA in History) in the social sciences and humanities would argue against a defined "western civilization." He also borrows heavily from "The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers by Paul Kennedy ." He attempts to explain the rise of the west in a paragraph. Distilling 500 years of history to a paragraph is always problematic. That said, I think once you get past his bravado regarding the "warrior spirit" his basic premise has merit.

Daniel Christensen
06-27-2007, 01:47 AM
Reading:
The Naked God by Peter Hamilton (space opera)
Eat That Frog by Brian Tracey(sel-improvement)
Brainwashing: the science of thought conrol by Kathleen Taylor

Most recently finished:
Emotions Revealed by Ekman (spelling)
Tipping Point

Inspired by this thread and despite telling myself no to order more books until i finish some of the ones I've already got bookmarks in, have just ordered:
Starting Strength
SCORE
Unleashing the Warrior Within, &
some book on Russian Breathing

and I've got 'Sucked In' by Shane Maloney (Aussie Crime Fiction) on the shelf, waiting...

Allen Yeh
06-27-2007, 04:57 AM
Just finished:
Last of the Wilds by Trudi Canavan (fantasy)
Voice of the Gods by Trudi Canavan (Fantasy)

Currently reading:
Freakonomics the revised edition
The Transformers (movie adapation) By Alan Dean Foster (July 4th here I come!!!!)

John Alston
06-27-2007, 08:00 AM
Now onto Martin Amis's Yellow Dog.
Not great. Didn't expect a ton from it. Amis is ultimately a disappointing writer. His best moments are pretty great, though, and he is managing to engage me... still, a summer read, not worth more than the 5 bucks I paid.

kevin mckay
07-01-2007, 11:39 AM
SAS Survival handbook "How to survive in the wild in any climate" very interesting read everything from making solar stills to sausage very paleo in many waays. I now have a strong desire to get lost in the woods for a month.

Scott Kustes
07-01-2007, 01:05 PM
Just finished Body Ecology Diet and started Plagues and Peoples.

Scott Clark
07-01-2007, 01:29 PM
Just finished Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell.

Chris Forbis
07-01-2007, 01:31 PM
SAS Survival handbook "How to survive in the wild in any climate" very interesting read everything from making solar stills to sausage very paleo in many waays. I now have a strong desire to get lost in the woods for a month.

Sounded interesting, so I looked it up on Amazon.

I now have another new book to buy.

Yael Grauer
07-01-2007, 02:16 PM
My favorite survival book (and I have a whole row on my shelf of just survival books) is Cody Lundin's 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive.

kevin mckay
07-01-2007, 08:43 PM
That and deep survival where other titles I looked at guess I will need to pick it up as well. Did you ever read deep survival?

I also would like to see a book regarding urban survival after social collapse but have not found anything.

Chuck Kechter
07-01-2007, 09:26 PM
I have...

It is a excellent read... Goes into psychological/emotional blueprinting, endocrinology, complexity theory, among other things -- that affect survival...

I thought it was very good!

Ron Nelson
07-01-2007, 10:30 PM
Finished Amerika by Franz Kafka and am now reading some of his short stories. Very abstract.

Will be reading The Family all about the Manson Family very soon.

Good summer so far.

kevin mckay
07-03-2007, 07:50 AM
Wow finally got lights out great read could not put it down! I slept on my kid's schedule last night 9pm-7am and am gonna keep it up whenever possible.

Joe Hart
07-03-2007, 03:37 PM
I just finished "Lights Out", also. I am not a science guy so was all the biology and what not that they were talking about accurate? They could have scientifically said "The sky is purple" and I would not have known it. It sounds pretty reasonable in the prescription chapters. I figure if I do a zone in the summer eating seasonal carbs and an athlete zone in the winter the nutrition ought to be okay. WOD ME WOD REST in the summer and ME WOD ME REST in the winter. 9.5 hours of sleep. That is what I took away from the book. Did I miss the boat and re-read it or am I okay?

Joe Hart
07-03-2007, 04:44 PM
Dan- Have you read "King Dork"? I suspect that you would enjoy it if you haven't.

Yael Grauer
07-06-2007, 09:06 PM
hey Joe, I'll be in Minnysoda in about a week! Any ideas on what to do? I REALLY want to train with Vanessa Herbst, but I don't know if that will happen. There's the Aquatennial, 10,000 Lakes Festival, Highland Fest... I have to research but too busy reading!

Oh yeah, new booklist. I finished most but not all of the ones in the other booklist (and some McGill) but am switching to work-related books. Doubt I will get through all these before school starts on August 7th but damned if I don't try!! All I need is to read three a week, haha... Hopefully some will be quick and easy to read.

Treatment of Error in Second Language Student Writing, by Dana Ferris

An Introduction to Bilingualism, by Hoffman

An Introduction to Second Language Acquisition Research, by Larsen-Freeman, and Long

Lives on the Boundary: A Moving Account of the Struggles and Achievements of America's Educationally Unprepared, by Mike Rose

Educating Esme: Diary of a Teacher's First Year, by Esmé Raji Codell and Esme Raji Codell

My First Year As A Teacher, by Pearl Rock

Inside Mrs. B.'s Classroom : Courage, Hope, and Learning on Chicago's South Side, by Leslie Baldacci

Habits of Mind: Struggling over Values in America's Classrooms, by Melinda Fine

Moral Questions in the Classroom: How to Get Kids to Think Deeply About Real Life and Their Schoolwork, by Katherine G. Simon

Errors and Expectations: A Guide for the Teacher of Basic Writing by Mina P. Shaughnessy

Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools by Jonathan Kozol

Reciprocal Teaching by Palincsar (out of print, I need to bake cookies for my research librarian...)

Joe Hart
07-07-2007, 07:40 AM
Yael- I'm on it. I will scrounge up some ideas and email them to you.

Robb Wolf
07-07-2007, 10:18 AM
Joe-
I think Lights Out is absolutely AMAZING and I think your succinct plan might be the height of balancing performance, health and longevity. I highly recommend re-reading the book each year...just reinforces the message and more will make sense.

Finally finished Lone Survivor...I really had to break that up with scientific papers and some other stuff to not get completely depressed. I'd really like to do more to help folks in the military...just not sure how to do it...yet.

Nicki is finishing the 4hr workweek...I'm starting on that and digging back into Blue Ocean Strategy.

Yael Grauer
07-07-2007, 11:26 AM
Joe--thanks!

Robb--I adopted a bunch of soldiers. It ain't much, but it's fun to send care packages.

http://www.supportasoldier.org/

Mike ODonnell
07-07-2007, 01:04 PM
Robb--I adopted a bunch of soldiers. It ain't much, but it's fun to send care packages.[/url]

I've been adopting a bunch of strippers....a dollar at a time.....someone has to pay for those 6" pumps and outfits....

Robb Wolf
07-07-2007, 03:14 PM
I think I will do a 50/50 split..both MOD's and Yael's causes seem worthy.

Derek Simonds
07-13-2007, 07:39 AM
Robb it always starts out 50 / 50 but them darn single moms have such a convincing or should I say conniving way of looking at you with their puppy dog eyes and next thing you know the ratios are totally screwed.

I just read a fictional book by Christopher Moore called Dirty Job. It was an easy read, fairly irreverent, mostly out there but totally enjoyable. Next trip I take I will pick up another one of his books.

Joe Hart
07-27-2007, 09:25 PM
I just finished that damn HArry Potter book. The only reason that I am vexed by this book is that I stayed up till 0100 last night. It was good. Now on to some mind expansion with the classics...The Great Gatsby.

I need to revisit "Thinking Like Davinci" It has some good stuff. The mind mapping was quite good in that it got stuff out of the way. It was like I thought of the same stuff all the time. Now that I have written the ideas down I can move on to some toher ideas.

Clear! CRACK. beep beep

Allen Yeh
07-28-2007, 08:00 PM
I just finished Midshipwizard Halycon Blithe, pretty good actually, it's like a mix of Harry Potter with the Naval Academy. I'm on to the second book tonight and my wife really wants me to read The Secret.

Pat McCarthy
08-02-2007, 12:22 PM
I always use the summer to take out some classics and other books I've been meaning to read forever, but never get around to reading due to work, studies, and other noise. I have always been a huge nerd (and snob probably) when it comes to literature, probably due to my snobbish English professor back in school who I worshiped.

Summer Reading Completed So Far:
Moby Dick (read it in HS but as with all HS reading didn't really "read" it, Ahab does really seem to embody the American man in a twisted way)

A Hundred Years of Solitude by Marquez (Highly recommend, a really pleasant read)

The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (I think every American should read this book, it really opens your eyes to the daily struggles that even educated immigrants go through in our country)

The Prize by Daniel Yergin (this was another reread; if you ever wonder why the West is so intertwined with all the problems in the Middle East, why populist bills in Congress always screw up the economy, and everything other problem in modern foreign policy, READ THIS BOOK! It's dense, it's long, but it is outstanding.)

The New Harry Potter (wasted a beautiful summer day reading this straight through, I don't think it will have the staying power of the Lord of the Rings or the Chronicles of Narnia but it is a cultural landmark)

The Short Stories of Gogol (they always remind me that everyone is my brother; I always try to be a better person after I read them and it usually lasts about a week)

The Iliad, translated by Robert Fitzgerald (a light story about guys impaling other guys on spears, I always try to get my literature-hating friends to read it, but they just want to watch 300 instead)

Catch-22 (reread, one of my favorites; not many books make me laugh outloud but this one always does)

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy (reread; in my opinion the best novel of the last 50 years; not a light-hearted read though)

The List of Books to be Read before September:
Don Quixote (I just picked up a new translation that is really well done, about halfway through)
The Master and Margarita
The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

After putting this together, it became quite clear that I probably need to go out more, but normal people are so boring. Once again, read The Prize. You won't regret it.

Kevin Perry
08-02-2007, 12:39 PM
Currently reading Rubicon. It's about the last days of the Roman republic.

Finished Practical Programming last week.

Kevin Anderson
08-02-2007, 12:40 PM
I just finished "A Fighter's Heart" by Sam Sheridan.

http://www.amazon.com/Fighters-Heart-Journey-Through-Fighting/dp/0871139502

It started off pretty good but fizzled out at the end. There is a chapter about dog fighting that I actually liked and alot of reviewers seemed to hate. Seemed timely due to the Michael Vick issue.

Mike ODonnell
08-02-2007, 12:51 PM
Read last Harry Potter.......I needed closure to move on with my life.......

Robert Allison
08-02-2007, 02:06 PM
I just finished "A Fighter's Heart" by Sam Sheridan.

http://www.amazon.com/Fighters-Heart-Journey-Through-Fighting/dp/0871139502



My jits coach has been reading A Fighter's Heart--he says it's pretty good, but I don't know how far along he is.

I am planning to read Last Wrestlers (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Wrestlers-Flung-Journey-Search/dp/product-description/0091910676)... it sounds similar to Fighter's Heart. You might check that out as well.

Steve Shafley
08-02-2007, 06:27 PM
The last 2 weeks or so.

"Requiem for an Assassin" by Barry Eisler (OK, but pretty standard "superassassin" with a conscious fair)
"The Android's Dream" by John Scalzi (quite a few chuckles)
"The Sharing Knife: Legacy" by Lois McMaster-Bujold
"Savage Season" by Joe L. Lansdale
"Hardwired" by Walter John Williams

And 2 others I can't think of.

The Lansdale and Williams are re-reads.

All fiction, which is what I like and enjoy. I read almost entirely for the pleasure of the story.

Allen Yeh
08-03-2007, 07:52 PM
Finished:

Dragonshipwizard Halycon Blythe - good book I just wish the others were out already and I didn't have to wait for them.

Working on slowly but surely:

The Paleo Diet

A book my wife wants me to read:

The Secret

Mike ODonnell
08-03-2007, 07:57 PM
A book my wife wants me to read:

The Secret

It may be an inspirational read...but here's the secret (never read it but I know what they talk about)....focus on what you want, be as specific as possible....your focus will draw your attention towards action....you will take action and accomplish your goal...if you are specific in your visualization....

Old message....many people present it a different way....the best way is whatever makes you get inspired and take action....

Allen Yeh
08-06-2007, 06:20 AM
Finally got my turn on the library waiting list....

Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows - Finished it in one day, started at 9 am yesterday, finished by 7:30 pm.

Joe Hart
10-01-2007, 07:23 PM
So I read Spook Country by William Gibson. It was pretty good. He did seem to have an ax to grind though. He would toss in a 2-3 page chapter that seemed to be directed at the government. All in all it was good. Not your standard cyberpunk fair.

I am working on an Emotions book by Paul Ekman. He had some stuff in Blink. It is a little tougher read.

Leo Soubbotine
10-02-2007, 07:18 AM
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand.

Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman - reading for every now and then. Probably for the 10th time.

Scott Kustes
10-02-2007, 09:03 AM
I'm almost done with Atlas Shrugged. I'm glad I didn't take the advice of Ross Hunt who told me to avoid the book...I've thoroughly enjoyed it. Although I do agree that she's repetitive....1070 pages isn't required for this book and it's largely the same as The Fountainhead, but in a different setting.

Yael Grauer
10-02-2007, 09:23 AM
I am reading so many books on teaching that it's ridiculous... Teaching Styles and Strategies, Classroom Instruction That Works, Your First Year of Teaching and Beyond, New Teacher Survival Book, So Each May Learn: Integrating Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences...

I did buy a book on time management though.

I need my reading life back!