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Josh Whiting
06-16-2007, 01:19 AM
Now I've tried to write this out a few times and it always sounds awful.

The question I have is that my girlfriend bruises really easily, if you poke her leg she will have a bruise the next day. Obviously this means that she picks up bruises in her legs and arms quite a lot from everyday activity, which annoys her and also worries me a bit. Does anyone have any input on this and what if anything can be done about it? She wants to do some BJJ but is concerned she will become one big bruise!

Ladies some of you love fighting and contact sports, do you have similar problems? If so can you do anything about it?

Do any of you nutrition gurus, doctors or general nerds have any input?

Expecting banter but would also appreciate some sensible input.

Yael Grauer
06-16-2007, 02:04 AM
I guess I'm in the "general nerd" category, though I prefer to be called a geek. Lack of vitamin C can cause easy bruising, so get her to eat foods rich in vit C and bioflavonoids. There are other reasons that I guess a doc can diagnose or it can be a side effect of medications, etc. I used to do vit. C in powdered form (mineral ascorbates) but sometimes I just do emergen-C and eat handfuls of goji berries...yum.

I do a lot of homeopathic arnica... (Yeah, yeah, there's no scientific proof it works but it's a damn effective "placebo" then.) I used to use 30c (the kind you can get in stores) but I find that 200c and even 1m is a lot more effective. Sometimes I take arnica (or arnica/rhus/ruta) before class as a preventative. I still bruise up sometimes but not nearly as bad.

I'll also add that I recently read an article (not sure where) about how women and men feel pain differently. Women are better with prolonged pain and men are better at handling acute pain. So I know that as a woman I'll probably take a bit longer to recover from, say, getting punched in the face... However, there are advantages...like I think it's easier for women to learn how to use their entire bodies instead of muscling through things because most of us do that every day... Just a thought. It makes sense in evolutionary biology so I guess it's fair game.

Hope this helps!!

Also tell her to read this:
http://tinyurl.com/y3jqy2

and this:
http://tinyurl.com/y68am5

There is also the fightergirls forum which can be good for asking questions (except there's some really annoying trolls that nobody will kick out for some reason).

Hope this helps!!!

Garrett Smith
06-16-2007, 06:33 AM
There could be significant issues here (coagulation defects, major nutritional deficiencies, toxicity)...has she had basic bloodwork done recently?

Gittit Shwartz
06-18-2007, 01:05 AM
Dr. G - I heard that easy bruising may be linked to excessive gastric acid secretion. Which may be brought about by aluminum toxicity. What do you think of this?
BTW, I really appreciate your taking the time to respond to every level of question on these boards. Wish you would post more stuff on your website...

Josh Whiting
06-18-2007, 03:26 AM
Yael,
Thanks for that. We'll try the vit c and arnica thing. I'm actually a big believer in arnica and carried it in my first aid kit for years.

Garrett,
She has not had any blood work done. What should they look for? What other signs and symptoms should she look for?

Garrett Smith
06-18-2007, 09:52 AM
Thank you Gittit.

With the practice I already had going, along with the cold laser one I just bought (same building), I'm wondering when I'll have time to write--at least until I get it operating via delegation enough that I free up some more time for other things.

A urine toxic metal test is becoming one of the first things I do in any situation.

Here's a link that expands upon other potential symptoms.
http://www.bookrags.com/Coagulation

www.Hemex.com specializes in clotting/coagulation disorders, fish around their site for more info.

Basically, we would want to rule out nutrient deficiency and systemic toxicity first. Out with the bad, in with the good.

CBC and CMP are basic starting points in the bloodwork, along with fibrinogen. See what you can get your PCP to go for--take them a list of labs if you find any more you think are applicable.