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View Full Version : Anyone tried to become an entomophagist?


Bo Bolund
07-25-2007, 06:48 AM
"Many species of insects are lower in fat, higher in protein, and have a better feed to meat ratio than beef, lamb, pork, or chicken. "

"Insects are easy to raise. There is no manure forking. No hay bale lifting. No veterinary bills. You can raise them in an apartment without getting complaints. "

"Raising insects is environmentally friendly. They require minimal space per pound of protein produced, have a better feed to meat ratio than any other animal you can raise, and are very low on the food chain. They are healthy, tasty, and have been utilized for the entire history of mankind (after all, it is easier to catch a grub than a mammoth). "

"The only real problem you may run into while utilizing insect protein is the lack of social acceptance." :D

http://www.eatbug.com/

Garrett Smith
07-25-2007, 07:02 AM
I find it humorous that grain-feeding is advised, even with something like entomophagy...

I'd personally try to figure out a better food, one that will not create O-6's in the critters...

Bo Bolund
07-25-2007, 07:18 AM
I find it humorous that grain-feeding is advised, even with something like entomophagy...

I'd personally try to figure out a better food, one that will not create O-6's in the critters...

I'm not sure it's advised but it's a fact that most food contain insects

... and some prefer their insects with tortillas :D

http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/ng.asp?id=42592-insects-as-protein

Robb Wolf
07-25-2007, 03:03 PM
I dated a super cute entomologist ...does that count?

Bo Bolund
07-26-2007, 03:11 AM
I dated a super cute entomologist ...does that count?

Only if she studied the taste of them and applied them in culinary art :D

Mike ODonnell
07-26-2007, 06:49 AM
I dated a super cute entomologist ...does that count?

She ever bring "dip" to a party?? Bet you never asked what it was made from.....

Robb Wolf
07-26-2007, 10:07 AM
I'll avoid dismemberment at Nicki's hands and keep my yap shut on this.

Bo Bolund
08-01-2007, 05:09 AM
Cooked grasshopper contains up to 60 percent protein with just 6 percent fat. Moreover, like fish, insect fatty acids are unsaturated and thus healthier.

DeFoliart, the Wisconsin entomologist, says that not only are insects nutritious and delicious, they could be an environmentally friendly source of human protein requirements.

"In our preoccupation with cattle, we have denuded the planet of vegetation," DeFoliart said. "Insects are much more efficient in converting biomass to protein."

Insect farming is arguably much more efficient than cattle production. One hundred pounds (45 kilograms) of feed produces 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) of beef, while the same amount of feed yields 45 pounds (20 kilograms) of cricket.

Noting the widespread use of pesticides in industrial agriculture, DeFoliart said, "People are poisoning the planet by ridding it of insects, rather than eating insects and keeping artificial chemicals off plants that we eat."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/07/0715_040715_tvinsectfood.html

Troy Archie
08-01-2007, 09:05 AM
From what I saw, Cambodians eat copious amounts of deep fried bugs. Tarantula, grasshopper/locust, grubs...there isn't much they won't eat actually. I saw one selling live turtles on the corner one day. It seemed odd because it was mixed in with all the "snack" vendors.

Garrett Smith
08-01-2007, 01:03 PM
After raw chicken and raw liver (dried and fresh), bugs just can't be that bad.

I've heard of the practice of fasting the critters for several days prior to consumption in order to clean out the digestive tract a bit more...

Bo Bolund
08-02-2007, 06:16 AM
I wonder when supermarkets will pick up on this.
Maybe people will start demanding it when meat prices skyrocket due to carbon dioxide emissions fees. :D

Troy Archie
08-02-2007, 08:18 AM
Put a "fat free" and "organic" label on it and I'm sure it would sell.

Garrett Smith
08-02-2007, 09:03 AM
Raw organic insect butter...

But if I eat it, no vegans will sleep with me...oh well.

Robert Allison
08-02-2007, 09:23 AM
After raw chicken and raw liver (dried and fresh), bugs just can't be that bad.

Raw chicken... that's pretty hard-core. I eat quite a bit of raw (or mostly raw) fish, beef and lamb, but I haven't been able to work up to raw pork or chicken. I know they are included in the Primal Diet, but I'm not there...

Garrett, what was the name of that raw liver powder you mentioned a while back?

Garrett Smith
08-02-2007, 05:28 PM
Robert,
The liver or thymus or adrenal powders are all from www.leviticus11.com .

As for the chicken, I definitely didn't enjoy it like red meat. I always marinated the organic free range chicken for several days, cut into cubes, in the juice of 1-2 lemons and several crushed cloves of garlic (not much is living through that, sometimes I added several drops of wild oregano oil). The marinade did a bit of the mild "chemical cooking" which improved the texture enough to be palatable. I just ate it right out of the marinating jar, no plate necessary.

David Aguasca
08-03-2007, 11:18 PM
the preparation seems kind of a hassle, though, doesn't it? i mean, separating 100 grams of cricket for just 12.9 grams of protein?

Bo Bolund
08-14-2007, 07:37 AM
Robert,
The liver or thymus or adrenal powders are all from www.leviticus11.com .

As for the chicken, I definitely didn't enjoy it like red meat. I always marinated the organic free range chicken for several days, cut into cubes, in the juice of 1-2 lemons and several crushed cloves of garlic (not much is living through that, sometimes I added several drops of wild oregano oil). The marinade did a bit of the mild "chemical cooking" which improved the texture enough to be palatable. I just ate it right out of the marinating jar, no plate necessary.

I always get sleepy when I eat meat.
Does raw meat digest easier?