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Ale Dileo
07-27-2007, 10:51 PM
hi guys, i'm actually eating 2000 – 2100 kcal a day, Ifing every day with a 3 hours eating window (i've stretched it after reading your advices and feel even better) ,
130 gr (25 %) carbs (mostly from veggies and fruit, only 30 gr of whole wheat homemade bread),
180 gr (35%) pro
90 gr (40%) fat (olive oil,eggs,fish oil)
my weight is 60 Kgr and my height is 174 cm (sorry!, European metrics)
In this season my daily activities are growing (12 hours moderately hard working) and i need to increase my energy intake to keep my weight stable.
According to you, can i increase my fat intake (about 20, 30 gr)?

Tony Ferous
07-28-2007, 04:19 AM
2000cals isnt much, but it depends on what you are trying to achieve though, lose fat, gain muscle, etc....

Ale Dileo
07-28-2007, 05:27 AM
Ok, my goal is to maintain the same weight and body comp and actually I achieve this with 2100 cals , but my energy needs are going to grow and i want to compensate increasing fat intake. I'm asking if 110 - 130 gr of fats is too much for health and bodycomp.

Robb Wolf
07-28-2007, 07:29 AM
Ale-
No problem with the increased fat intake, you may even find body comp improvements. If you need to drop a little of the veggies (or cook them )to allow more room for food that is not a problem also.

Ci Dice del suo progresso!

Ale Dileo
07-28-2007, 12:11 PM
Ale-
No problem with the increased fat intake, you may even find body comp improvements. If you need to drop a little of the veggies (or cook them )to allow more room for food that is not a problem also.

Ci Dice del suo progresso!

Vi terṛ informati .... that means: I'll keep you updated! ... (I hope!:) )

Greg Battaglia
07-30-2007, 02:47 PM
I don't know if you can get them in Italy, but nut butters work wonders for increasing fat intake. Macadamia and Cashew butter is orgasmic.

Ale Dileo
07-30-2007, 07:23 PM
I don't know if you can get them in Italy, but nut butters work wonders for increasing fat intake. Macadamia and Cashew butter is orgasmic.

i often have some peanut butter ,but i make it by myself with only peanuts and some good oil (several brands that i can find here are full of bad stuff). For macadamia and cashew ... never heard before.

Bo Bolund
07-31-2007, 02:30 AM
No problems. I think it's safe to increase fat as long as you burn it and stay out of ketosis.

Scott Kustes
07-31-2007, 06:13 AM
Bo, why stay out of ketosis?

Bo Bolund
08-01-2007, 04:58 AM
Bo, why stay out of ketosis?


I don't think it's healthy. Studies have shown ketogenic diets increase cortisol levels, which have a catabolic effect on the brain.

One can control cortisol levels with carb/protein intake ratio. Some may benifit from increased cortisol levels since it has an anti-inflammatory effect.
Others may benifit from decreased cortisol levels since it will potentiate the immune system.
I try to have a moderate carb intake... around 150 gram.

Robb Wolf
08-01-2007, 09:24 AM
Bo-
I suspect the elevated cortisol level may be an acute response. Longer exposure and adaptation tends to show an increased resistance to cellular stress, including cortisol toxicity.

Bo Bolund
08-02-2007, 02:15 AM
Robb

I don't think so. Studies show cortisol levels follow protein/carb ratio and rat studies show decreased neurogenesis in rats brain on ketogenic diets.

Stuart Mather
08-02-2007, 05:15 AM
I don't think it's healthy. Studies have shown ketogenic diets increase cortisol levels, which have a catabolic effect on the brain.

One can control cortisol levels with carb/protein intake ratio. Some may benifit from increased cortisol levels since it has an anti-inflammatory effect.
Others may benifit from decreased cortisol levels since it will potentiate the immune system.
I try to have a moderate carb intake... around 150 gram.

Bo, Mike Eades blogged about ketosis and the brain (among other organs) recently. His reading of the available research is that long term ketosis is beneficial across the physiological board. There's also the overwhelming evidence of over seventy years of successful treating of juvenile epilepsy with ketogenic diets.
Not just in seizure frequency reduction, but general neurological [B]and other[B] health markers.

I've personally been keeping carbs below 30g for nearly six years. Surely if ketosis did lead to any degree of neurological catabolism, I would have been brain dead years ago. The memory improvement I've noticed during this stretch alone convinces me that ketosis is a very good thing indeed.

Where are you getting your evidence?

Stuart.

Bo Bolund
08-02-2007, 05:50 AM
"High-fat diet impairs hippocampal neurogenesis in male rats

In this study, we show that just four weeks of feeding a diet rich in fat ad libitum decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in male, but not female, rats. There was no obesity, but male rats fed a diet rich in fat exhibited elevated serum corticosterone levels compared to those fed standard rat chow. These data indicate that high dietary fat intake can disrupt hippocampal neurogenesis, probably through an increase in serum corticosterone levels, and that males are more susceptible than females."


http://ask.lub.lu.se/archive/00029696/01/ErlandssonAlbertssonElsevier.pdf

Mark Gebhard
08-02-2007, 08:12 AM
Maybe I'm misreading the study and the reference that details the high fat diet they used, but I don't see any mention of ketosis. The high fat diet was 24% protein, 34% carb, 42% fat, hardly a guarantee of ketosis (although kinda looks like the Zone). This is compared to the low fat diet of 28, 57, 15%.

Bo Bolund
08-02-2007, 08:42 AM
Maybe I'm misreading the study and the reference that details the high fat diet they used, but I don't see any mention of ketosis. The high fat diet was 24% protein, 34% carb, 42% fat, hardly a guarantee of ketosis (although kinda looks like the Zone). This is compared to the low fat diet of 28, 57, 15%.

That's a good point :D

Garrett Smith
08-02-2007, 09:01 AM
How much fat is in a typical "wild" rat's diet anyway?

Feeding animals atypical diets (a la humans and grains) is a sure way to induce disease.

Robb Wolf
08-02-2007, 10:17 AM
Maybe I'm misreading the study and the reference that details the high fat diet they used, but I don't see any mention of ketosis. The high fat diet was 24% protein, 34% carb, 42% fat, hardly a guarantee of ketosis (although kinda looks like the Zone). This is compared to the low fat diet of 28, 57, 15%.

bingo. A key feature of hyperinsulinism is hyper corticism. The NIH-007 rat chow (typically the base ingredient in these diets) is highly refined carbs. Have not read the study but you may be looking at a relatively high fat, high carb diet. No one likes that!

Scott Kustes
08-02-2007, 12:54 PM
How much fat is in a typical "wild" rat's diet anyway?

Feeding animals atypical diets (a la humans and grains) is a sure way to induce disease.
I was wondering that too Garrett. Similar to Ancel Keys feeding rabbits a high-cholesterol diet and using that as proof that cholesterol is bad for humans.