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View Full Version : Abdominal lypolysis in fasting subjects


Steve Shafley
08-19-2007, 09:57 AM
Thought this was interesting. Haven't seen the full text yet. Last sentence is what I found neat.

Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 Sep;27(5):320-6.
Post-exercise abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis in fasting subjects is inhibited by infusion of the somatostatin analogue octreotide.
Enevoldsen LH, Polak J, Simonsen L, Hammer T, Macdonald I, Crampes F, de Glisezinski I, Stich V, Bülow J.

Department of Clinical Physiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

To determine whether blockade of the exercise-induced increase in growth hormone (GH) secretion may affect the regional lipolytic rate in the post-exercise recovery period, the aim of the present experiments was to study the effect of infusion of the somatostatin analogue octreotide on the s.c., abdominal adipose tissue metabolism, before, during and after exercise in healthy, fasting, young male subjects. The adipose tissue net releases of fatty acids and glycerol were measured by arterio-venous catherizations and simultaneous measurements of adipose tissue blood flow with the local Xe-clearance method. Nine subjects were studied during 1-h basal rest, and then during continuous octreotide infusion during 1-h rest, 1-h exercise at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption and 4-h post-exercise rest. A control study on seven subjects was performed under similar conditions but without octreotide infusion. The results show that octreotide infusion during rest increased lipolysis and fatty acid release from the abdominal, s.c. adipose tissue. The exercise-induced increase in lipolysis and fatty acid release does not seem to be affected by octreotide when compared with the control study without octreotide infusion while the post-exercise increase in lipolysis is inhibited by octreotide, suggesting that the exercise-induced increase in GH secretion plays a role for the post-exercise lipolysis in s.c., abdominal adipose tissue.

Scott Kustes
08-19-2007, 11:30 AM
So for us dummies, that means that post-exercise GH release helps trim fat out of the stomach? And moving along from there, post-exercise nutrition often spikes insulin, which shuts down GH production, which would therefore shut down lipolysis? Am I way off base here?

Mike ODonnell
08-19-2007, 03:15 PM
So for us dummies, that means that post-exercise GH release helps trim fat out of the stomach? And moving along from there, post-exercise nutrition often spikes insulin, which shuts down GH production, which would therefore shut down lipolysis? Am I way off base here?

GH and insulin have opposite roles....one goes up...the other goes down. So insulin release would shut down GH production (hence why you don't want big or carb meals within 3 hours of going to bed). Increased GH has been linked to increased fat loss. Why lots of people (like De Vany) will workout and then wait like an hour to eat a normal meal.

Robb Wolf
08-20-2007, 11:30 AM
GH and insulin have opposite roles....one goes up...the other goes down. So insulin release would shut down GH production (hence why you don't want big or carb meals within 3 hours of going to bed). Increased GH has been linked to increased fat loss. Why lots of people (like De Vany) will workout and then wait like an hour to eat a normal meal.

Exactly! I was thinking of Devany when I first read this.

I know Berardi and others have cited some studies that point towards an increased GH release with a high glycemic PWO meal...but I have certainly noticed that a low carb meal PWO is my best bet for leaning out. Interesting also that the fat loss is specific to the abdominal subcutaneous fat.

good find Steve!

Scott Kustes
08-20-2007, 11:41 AM
GH and insulin have opposite roles....one goes up...the other goes down. So insulin release would shut down GH production (hence why you don't want big or carb meals within 3 hours of going to bed). Increased GH has been linked to increased fat loss. Why lots of people (like De Vany) will workout and then wait like an hour to eat a normal meal.
So I was barking up the right tree for once. See folks...miracles do occur.

I too have noticed that not having a high carb drink after working out is best for leaning out. Although using higher GI fruits and vegetables doesn't seem to affect me much so long as I keep my overall carb intake reasonable. Sweet potatoes and fruit PWO are all good, but I do load up on protein and fat afterwards also. I've also noticed no performance effects from waiting 60-90 minutes after working out to start feeding, a la DeVany.

Mike ODonnell
08-20-2007, 12:45 PM
I know Berardi and others have cited some studies that point towards an increased GH release with a high glycemic PWO meal.

The whole argument of the PWO drink will go on till the end of time (considering that is a huge market for the supplement industry too, so they won't say anything against it)....it may work for some....others maybe not.....I am sure at some point there is spillover from excess carbs, so the amount may differ...while others may respond fine with a meal 2 hours later.....too many variables, but these studies are interesting none the less:

Dietary supplements affect the anabolic hormones after weight-training exercise

R. M. Chandler, H. K. Byrne, J. G. Patterson and J. L. Ivy
Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas at Austin 78712.

To examine the effect of carbohydrate and/or protein supplements on the hormonal state of the body after weight-training exercise, nine experienced male weight lifters were given water (Control) or an isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO; 1.5 g/kg body wt), protein (PRO; 1.38 g/kg body wt), or carbohydrate-protein (CHO/PRO; 1.06 g carbohydrate/kg body wt and 0.41 g protein/kg) supplement immediately and 2 h after a standardized weight-training workout. Venous blood samples were drawn before and immediately after exercise and during 8 h of recovery. Exercise induced elevations in lactate, glucose, testosterone, and growth hormone. CHO and CHO/PRO stimulated higher insulin concentrations than PRO and Control. CHO/PRO led to an increase in growth hormone 6 h postexercise that was greater than PRO and Control. Supplements had no effect on insulin-like growth factor I but caused a significant decline in testosterone. The decline in testosterone, however, was not associated with a decline in luteinizing hormone, suggesting an increased clearance of testosterone after supplementation. The results suggest that nutritive supplements after weight-training exercise can produce a hormonal environment during recovery that may be favorable to muscle growth by stimulating insulin and growth hormone elevations.
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/76/2/839

and

In summary, these data indicate that consuming a nutritional supplement before and immediately after heavy-resistance training workouts performed over 3 consecutive days results in different exercise-induced patterns of metabolic and hormonal variables. Specifically, consuming a protein-carbohydrate supplement before and after a resistance training session increases the concentrations of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and IGF-I while decreasing lactate accumulation. Such responses would be predicted to enhance glycogen and protein synthesis during recovery; however, this was not determined in this investigation. These responses were observed in a group of moderately resistance-trained men and may not apply to other populations (i.e., untrained individuals, women, etc.). These data demonstrate that protein-carbohydrate supplementation before and after training may alter the metabolic and hormonal responses to consecutive days of heavy-resistance exercise.
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/85/4/1544