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Jordan Glasser
09-20-2007, 10:36 PM
Is it possible to react from just a little cayenne pepper? I made the paleo mayo this evening and added a little more cayenne accidently. With the meal I also ate a bit of Kimchi, that also has some red peppers in it (It was the last of a 1 liter jar, with no previous reactions when eating it). One hour later my hands are all swollen. Is it possible to be that sensitive to nightshades. I have been avoiding them for about 5 months.

Otherwise, my diet and training has been going extremely well.

Garrett Smith
09-21-2007, 06:32 AM
Jordan,
That would be absolutely possible.

The best way to know (if you want to try) is to avoid all nightshades for about a week after all symptoms of this episode have completely relieved, then purposely try a high dose of nightshades (you may want to mix several types, as in a baked potato with salsa on it). Watch for a similar reaction. If it happens, then you'll know.

Greg says the October PMenu will be the appearance of my first article on the nightshades...

Greg Battaglia
09-22-2007, 09:06 AM
I've never noticed any joint pain or swelling from nightshades. I do however, have a general feeling of malaise after eating any night shades. That's enough for me to stay away.

Scott Kustes
09-22-2007, 10:39 AM
I can tolerate low levels of nightshades with no ill effects. I used to eat daily salads with tomatoes and green peppers and I had lots of popping. I dropped those from the salads and all of that went away. I can now eat tomato sauce a few times a week and throw some hot sauce on things without feeling the popping that I used to. I still try to limit it, but sometimes hot sauce just makes the meal (salsa and hot sauce are a must on eggs).

Patrick Donnelly
09-22-2007, 11:55 AM
Anyone mind explaining what a nightshade is exactly?
I've heard mention of them, but I don't see why a pepper wouldn't be Paleo... It is just another vegetable, right?

Eva Claire Synkowski
09-22-2007, 01:28 PM
dr. g can give way more info than me, but for a start: NS include: tomatoes, potatoes (excepts sweet potatoes and yams), peppers, and eggplant. they contain alkaloids (think nicotine) and are linked to inflammation (e.g., arthritis).

great link here:
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=62

i hear Dr. G will have an article in the oct PM that i am looking forward to....

Garrett Smith
09-22-2007, 04:38 PM
Another site that discusses nightshades is www.noarthritis.com .

As there are poisonous plants that bear fruit/nuts/seeds, one wouldn't want to eat them just because they fit into a "Paleo" definition.

Nightshades cause chronic inflammation and disease, I just get started into that subject in the October PM. The number of mechanisms by which this happens is quite amazing. I'm finding stuff that no one has even talked about on the two sites mentioned so far.

Jordan Glasser
09-22-2007, 06:14 PM
Jordan,
That would be absolutely possible.

The best way to know (if you want to try) is to avoid all nightshades for about a week after all symptoms of this episode have completely relieved, then purposely try a high dose of nightshades (you may want to mix several types, as in a baked potato with salsa on it). Watch for a similar reaction. If it happens, then you'll know.

Greg says the October PMenu will be the appearance of my first article on the nightshades...

I have been off nightshades for months now, and that was the second type episode of swollen hands. The first was about 2 weeks ago when baking yams and adding a cajun type seasoning. I thought it was from the yams, and didn't think anything of it. This time around, every ingredient was something that I've been eating for months, except cayenne pepper. But, being a spice, I thought it was too little to get a reaction. But, apparently not!

Garrett Smith
09-22-2007, 10:15 PM
Jordan,
Many people are more sensitive to one type of the nightshades than the others. Sadly, it always seems to be the one that is their favorite.

Peppers are really bad, in more ways than one. I'll probably do a whole article just on them. If you know you're sensitive, stay far away. The short term sacrifice will have long term benefits.

Jordan Glasser
09-23-2007, 12:58 AM
It's cayenne spice in this case.
It's off to the spice rack to see how many are going for the garbage.
As a bit of a side note, I am in Seattle for the weekend. Last minute cancellation of clients, and with my first day off in over 2 months, I decided to visit my good friends at crossfit Seattle. Setting foot in a trader joe's again was like heaven, and finishing off at PCC, I found every type of food I have been struggling to find in whistler. Grass fed meats, fermented veggies, kombucha tea, all with the dollar at par. I can't wait to give my answer to customs when they ask what I spent: "I purchased about 400$ worth of goods;Cooler full of grass fed meats, cultured veggies, apple cider vinegar, fish oils, ohh...and I bought a pair of socks.

Bought back to the topic of nightshades and Kombucha. From what I understand, this is not a nightshade, not a mushroom? Is this correct?
I did feel fine after drinking it.

Garrett Smith
09-23-2007, 08:09 AM
The only similarity between kombucha and mushrooms is in the appearance of a "mushroom" that grows on the top of the kombucha. Mushrooms are not nightshades--the main food NS are tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant, paprika, goji/wolf berries, gooseberries, and tobacco.

The kombucha "mushroom" is what is known as a SCOBY--Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria & Yeast, it has nothing to do with fruit/veggies/mushrooms at all.

Jordan Glasser
09-23-2007, 08:55 AM
Thank You once again!