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Patrick Donnelly
09-28-2007, 10:38 PM
The record at my high school is a 4:11.5, set 30 years ago by Billy Ledder. I'd like to change that.

Yeah, that's a ridiculous time. But I'd like to beat it, or at least try. Seems like it'd be fun. I'm very open to advice on training...


Where I stand now:
Age: 17 (18 on 11/17)
Sex: Male
Weight: 175#, ~10% bodyfat
Height: 6'1 (I'd rather say 6'2...)
Diet: Paleo w/ 6 hour feeding window
CFT: 590 (as of 7/28/2007)
Prior training:
- Cross Country when I was 15 and 16 years old (avg. 5k time: 22:00ish)
- began "working out" in Fall of 2006 when I turned 17
- began doing some psuedo-CrossFit workouts in Spring of 2007
- did strength training during June-July of 2008; first month was extremely unsuccessful until I cleaned up my program; second month was good, but only showed major gains in higher rep maxes
- CrossFit and ME lifting during August and September with weekly 5k's done for Cross Country training

This Cross Country season, I'm getting times on par with previous years... Though, I'm 1000x more fit overall. I've pretty much accepted that I won't get any blazing times, though in hindsight I would have been better off filling June-July '07 with MetCon, 1-2k intervals, 3k sprints, and 5k runs. My last race for the season is on 10/27/07. I'll stick with the team until then.

I've come to the conclusion that I am extremely slow-twitch dominant. Extremely. As an example: I tested my 1RM pull-up yesterday. I came out to 60 pounds... Which I had back in May (bodyweight 165# too). Though in the past two months, my 3RM pull-up has gone from about 30 to 40, making slow, but steady, gains each week. There is also the summer strength training I did, where my 2RM backsquat was 195#, my 1RM backsquat was also 195#, and my deadlift 1RM increased a whopping 5# (to 280#).

That isn't necessarily bad though... Just means I have to realize that when I'm trying to determine how to train.

Current 1600m: 6:15 (ran in early August, when I had NO conditioning... Not really "current.")
Current 400m: 1:03-1:06 (ran recently; these need to get down to about 0:53 to beat 4:11.5.)

I'll try to update soon with a new 1600m time and with a "fastest decently sustainable pace" for both time kept up and distance covered.


Where I want to stand:
On the other side of the finish line, in under 4:11.5.

Starting in November I'm going to begin training specifically to reach that goal. Even though it seems counterintuitive to running, I think I may also try to gain an additional 15-25 pounds, seeing as how I am still extremely scrawny, even at my weight. As long as I get strength/explosiveness to go with the bodyweight, there should be no issue.

Mon: Push ME lifting + Tabata
Tue: Rest
Wed: 4x400m + Power-Biased MetCon (eg. 9x5 heavy Fran, or interval Murph)
Thu: Rest
Fri: Pull ME lifting + Tabata
Sat: 1600m + MetCon in the 4-10 minute range.
Sun: Rest
*** ME days will be sort of an imitation of the P-Menu Mass Gain Template. 1-2 upper body exercises and 1 lower body, done in a SetxRep scheme of something like 6x6, 5x7, or maybe even 5x8... Remember, I don't gain well at the lower rep maxes, and for 1600m training, maybe I wouldn't even want to.
*** The tabata interval will be a rotation between: push-ups, squats, GHD sit-ups, rowing, box jumps, push-press, bench press, front squats, pull-ups, hang power clean. Feel free to offer other things that you think may be "fun."


Once I am no longer trying to gain any mass...
Day 1: ME Push + Tabata
Day 2: 1x800m + Regular MetCon 4-10 minute range
Day 3: PB MetCon
Day 4: Rest
Day 5: ME Pull + Tabata
Day 6: 2x400m + Regular MetCon 4-10 minute range
Day 7: 1600m
Day 8: Rest
*** ME days would probably be in the 4-6 rep range.

I have PLENTY of equipment at home with which to train, though since I train outside, I'm not sure how that'll work in the winter... I don't mind the cold (good lung training!), but snow could be an issue (warm-up: shovel patio for time!). There is also my high school which has a track and decently equipped weight room.

I also normally get plenty of sleep... Though, it's 1:38 AM right now... Fell asleep this afternoon for a few hours... Which reminds me, I've got some questions about naps, but I really should hold them off for later. G'night.

Steve Liberati
09-29-2007, 06:45 AM
Wow you really have your schit together Patrick. When I was your age, I was running around chasing girls, doing keg stands, and training to be a full-time idiot. Not much advice to offer you bud, other than I think you'll do just fine and venture to say that you're probably well ahead of the pack with your plan above.

Keep training hard and good things will happen for you. Keep us posted.

Daniel Myers
09-29-2007, 06:41 PM
Starting in November I'm going to begin training specifically to reach that goal. Even though it seems counterintuitive to running, I think I may also try to gain an additional 15-25 pounds, seeing as how I am still extremely scrawny, even at my weight. As long as I get strength/explosiveness to go with the bodyweight, there should be no issue.

Mon: Push ME lifting + Tabata
Tue: Rest
Wed: 4x400m + Power-Biased MetCon (eg. 9x5 heavy Fran, or interval Murph)
Thu: Rest
Fri: Pull ME lifting + Tabata
Sat: 1600m + MetCon in the 4-10 minute range.
Sun: Rest


If you want to train "specifically" to set a 1600m record, you have to actually run. Tabatas are great, but running 3200m a week is not going to do it. Also, trying to gain 15-25 pounds doesn't fit into the specific nature of your goal. Your best bet is to join the school's track team and tell the coach that you want to run middle distance events. Then you'll get coaching and a training program geared to races at that distance. If you intend to break the school record, you'll have to do it in a meet anyway.

Patrick Donnelly
09-29-2007, 07:03 PM
Re: Steve
Yeah, I don't find going to a party, getting drunk, getting high, then getting laid and not even being able to remember it "fun." Then again... My definition of fun is collapsing after a tough WOD... Hmmmm....

Re: Daniel
Uh, you don't know our school's track coach... I can guarantee you whatever training program he could come up with would be total crap. He sent out an email today saying that on Tuesday, he won't be able to hold a practice, but everyone ought to run 4.6 miles in 30:00 on their own. That's faster than half the team's race pace.


Oh, and there's a 5k race the next day.


How much running per week do you recommend? I forgot to mention that my warm-up would have a 400-800m in it, depending on the day. I think a few quality intervals would do me better than a high volume of garbage.

Daniel Myers
09-30-2007, 08:50 AM
I don't have any specific recommendations, because I know jack-all about track training. But I think you would be better off finding a program written by a competent coach specifically for 1600m training. Look around online, check out some books written by track coaches -- I'm sure you can find something if you search for it. What you've put together may be a great all-around fitness program, but has very little work that's specific to your goal of running 1600m in less than 4:11.5.

Patrick Donnelly
09-30-2007, 06:48 PM
I don't have any specific recommendations, because I know jack-all about track training. But I think you would be better off finding a program written by a competent coach specifically for 1600m training.

Well, Google searching for "1600m training program" had this thread as a page-2 result. http://img362.imageshack.us/img362/1091/iconwackobz7.gif

Other programs I found were either total bull**** written merely to add pages to a website, or sets of intervals switching up for each day of the week, which seem workable.

I did find out who our track coach from 1977 was though... He was actually a guidance counselor at my high school too... Up until this year... He's taking a year off for chemotherapy and cancer treatment... I may still be able to contact him...

-Ross Hunt
10-01-2007, 10:41 AM
I sure as heck never ran 4:11, but I ran ~4:45, which was good enough to medal a couple times at state in my division and bring home a medal for the men's medley relay at state my senior year. My 5k times were in the 17s.

I also came back three years later and 25 pounds heavier, and trained my mile back down to 5:00 over the course of about 3 months of nothing but 200-400m sprints, a little metcon, and a lot of oly lifting.

I think your goals are absolutely awesome, but you need to do a couple of reality checks.

1) You need to join the track team. Smart training programs are good, but nothing beats competition, and you can only get that on the team.

2) You need to realize that there is a huge difference between taking your time from 6:00 to 5:00 and taking it from 5:00 to 4:45; taking it from 4:45 to 4:30 is harder still. You will definitely need more specific running training for the latter improvements.

3) You do not need to gain bodyweight, or at least definitely not more than 5-10 pounds. 175 is already plenty heavy for a 1600 meter man.

4) Don't ignore speed training. Running 200-400m really made my mile faster.

5) I think metcon training is really valuable, but I think that one of the best things about is the ability to tax your CV system without trashing your legs. This means that mixed-modality metcon (circuits of ~10 minutes of rounds for time, even doing pretty low reps--e.g., 5xback squat, 5x KB snatch per side, 5x chin-up) may be more helpful to you on your strength days than tabatas, which will mess with your legs.

6) Your goals are awesome and your ideas to use strength and shorter metcon and running to train for them are, I think, smart. But you have to be prepared to accept your coach's authority. Even if what he says seems wrong--or even if it IS wrong--actually BEING in the sport and going to meets is going to do more for your mile time than the best training on your own.

You might try to dig up some stuff of Alan Webb's training program. A couple years ago, he was the first guy to break 4:00 in high school in a long time, and I think he was known for having a slightly higher bodyweight than usual and doing shorter training than most milers.

Feel free to ask any questions about this.

James Evans
10-01-2007, 12:18 PM
I'd back Daniel on the 'run more' front.

But f**k, what do I know? I can't run for shit anyway.

Seriously though, I made a vague hint about this the other day. Some specificity is necessary. Tabatas and sprints get you fit, but across how many levels? Don't be that be that moonhead over at dragondoor who prepared for a marathon by...just lifting kettlebells. In respect for him it was an experiment but if I suggested swimming the English Channel on a regimen of spinning you'd laugh at me.

As for an internet search, 1500m might be a better bet as it is the competitive distance.

Patrick Donnelly
10-01-2007, 02:47 PM
1) You need to join the track team. Smart training programs are good, but nothing beats competition, and you can only get that on the team.

I guess I'll take a look into Spring track then... I'd like to at least give myself the winter to see what training works and how far I can progress with it. I do realize the importance of competition... But that only comes into play in the event itself, not in the training.

2) You need to realize that there is a huge difference between taking your time from 6:00 to 5:00 and taking it from 5:00 to 4:45; taking it from 4:45 to 4:30 is harder still.

Trust me, that is a huge relief for me. How so? Because I know that a 4:11.5, though it is ridiculous, is at least possible when compared to the 100x more difficult 4:00.

You will definitely need more specific running training for the latter improvements.

But how much? The benefits I see from more running are form improvement and psychological improvements (ie. teach yourself not to wuss out). My form is pretty solid, and I am working on it with short runs when I am fresh, which is conducive to good form. The psychological improvements are, well, only psychological. Intervals can develop power and endurance to a point, but can't Oly lifts and conditioning do that to a higher extent? I see that training as giving one the potential to run fast, then the actual interval training as realizing that training and practicing to get full use out of it.

3) You do not need to gain bodyweight, or at least definitely not more than 5-10 pounds. 175 is already plenty heavy for a 1600 meter man.

I've been looking at some track star photos, and shorter distances have significantly more mass than marathon runners, but still not much. It looks like I'll have to rethink any weight gain.

4) Don't ignore speed training. Running 200-400m really made my mile faster.

I wouldn't intend to.

5) I think metcon training is really valuable, but I think that one of the best things about is the ability to tax your CV system without trashing your legs. This means that mixed-modality metcon (circuits of ~10 minutes of rounds for time, even doing pretty low reps--e.g., 5xback squat, 5x KB snatch per side, 5x chin-up) may be more helpful to you on your strength days than tabatas, which will mess with your legs.

I wouldn't dare think about doing Tabata squats each time! I could name a good dozen exercises to rotate between, each of which would improve lactate threshold and anaerobic ability. Today I tried Tabata GHD sit-ups, as a test, though by the end, I think the majority of my fatigue was from the blood rush to my head and not the exercise... That may not be a good one.

6) Your goals are awesome and your ideas to use strength and shorter metcon and running to train for them are, I think, smart. But you have to be prepared to accept your coach's authority. Even if what he says seems wrong--or even if it IS wrong--actually BEING in the sport and going to meets is going to do more for your mile time than the best training on your own.

Like I mentioned above, I'll get to that in the Spring when I can show Coach how well I can do at that point.

You might try to dig up some stuff of Alan Webb's training program. A couple years ago, he was the first guy to break 4:00 in high school in a long time, and I think he was known for having a slightly higher bodyweight than usual and doing shorter training than most milers.

Feel free to ask any questions about this.

The public library has a copy of the book Sub 4:00: Alan Webb and the Quest for the Fastest Mile. I'll try to make a trip there this evening.


Re: James Evans
Kettlebells for a marathon? I would think he's "experimenting" with more than just kettlebells...

James Evans
10-01-2007, 02:58 PM
I remember reading that article with the unfolding horror and yet morbid fascination of witnessing a very slow car crash.

Go for broke with your effort and let us know how you get on.

James

Steven Low
10-01-2007, 04:30 PM
Having no experience as a runner... since "middle distance" like 1600m is more just becoming at all out sprint it seems to me that a combination of intervals and metcon would be the most effective.

If you can transfer from your phosphagen to glycolytic to a bit of oxidative with very little dropoff, you'll do really well. Having just read what Ross said about his experience I think this would be the best idea to base it on.

Concerning HIIT like intervals I think it would be best to program variations of run/sprint vs. jog from 200/200 all the way up to about 350/50. I'm *not* actually sure it would be a good idea to do so but run maybe 2000m for your intervals.. but at the very least about 1200m. Also, I was reading some stuff earlier on Wariner and Johnson for the 400m and they were running a bunch of stuff shorter and then resting 1-5 mins and then running more. For example, 300m then 250m or 3x350. Something along the lines of 1200m then 800m with a minute or two rest inbetween might also work well.

Anyway, those are just my thoughts from a non-runner. :) I'm almost positive that metcon is the way to go since the WR the 400m times people are looking at start to change energy pathways around 300m.

P.S. make sure your running form is very, very good.

James Evans
10-02-2007, 05:39 AM
Just to give you some ideas:

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/middist/tp1500.htm

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/middist/tp1500p1.htm

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/middist/tp1500p2.htm

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/middist/tp1500p3.htm

Patrick Donnelly
10-02-2007, 02:33 PM
Re: Steven
I'm getting pretty good on the form, but I'll keep working on it. The Vibram FiveFingers helped a lot; if you run incorrectly wearing them, you sure know it!

Re: James
Thanks for the links.

-Ross Hunt
10-02-2007, 04:08 PM
I do realize the importance of competition... But that only comes into play in the event itself, not in the training.



You might be surprised, really. Just like you get better at weightlifting by training frequently around oly lifters, so you get better at running by training with track athletes. If anything, I think competition in training is even more helpful in track than in weightlifting or powerlifting, because you're literally running agianst your teammates. Competition produces better times, and better times produce competition. Besides, even if you never miss a practice on your own, you'll run faster when you're running against someone, no matter how dedicated you are.


[QUOTE=Patrick Donnelly;20502]



Trust me, that is a huge relief for me. How so? Because I know that a 4:11.5, though it is ridiculous, is at least possible when compared to the 100x more difficult 4:00.

[QUOTE=Patrick Donnelly;20502]


That's the attitude! :D If that's how you think, then it sounds like you have the mindset to reach that sort of a goal.

Patrick Donnelly
10-02-2007, 07:38 PM
Any recommendations for which lifts to do for lower body strength and power?

Got this in mind as of now:

Push:
- weighted jump squats
- push press
- heavy thrusters
- backsquat/pistol (Not sure which to choose, if not both.)

Pull:
- clean
- snatch
- deadlift
- weighted back extension

-Ross Hunt
10-05-2007, 02:27 PM
Push-press tends to emphasize upper body more than lower, although it does serve as a speed and strength assistance exercise for the jerk.


Lower:

Back Squat
Front Squat
Deadlift from floor or Romanian DL starting from top
Clean and variations (if you have a coach to make sure your tech is good)
Snatch and variations (ditto)


Also, you might try the front and back split squat. This is basically a lunge, except you don't push off the lead foot and come all the way back to standing with feet together after each rep; you just push back to the point where you're in a split jerk stance and you're completely stable, and then step forward to do the next rep. I recommend the front and back split squat because your leverage may very well be better in this exercise than in a full back squat, since you're so tall. I'm also fairly tall (6'), and I have long legs, so I can split squat more than I back squat. More load----> More strength.

The split squat emphasizes the back and front of the leg more or less evenly, so even though it is technically a 'push,' it, like the powerlifting back squat, sort of overlaps both categories.

The oly lifts are great, but since your overall strength is still quite low, I doubt whether you need to do any specific power/ speed work. Just work strength on the one hand and running on the other, and you'll get what you need.

Patrick Donnelly
10-06-2007, 01:44 PM
Re: Front Squats
What is the added benefit of loading the weight in front anyway?

Re: Split Squat
I'm not sure I'm following you. Is this it?
http://youtube.com/watch?v=NsujBLD_fe0

If it is, would I be correct in assuming he chopped his ROM off greatly?

Re: Power (Oly lifts) v. Strength (powerlifts)
I'm fairly certain I have the clean and snatch down now, but I would get a video for critique before using it them frequently. But you're right, I probably would want to build a better strength base before working with them.

But would working in the 6-8 rep range be all right for building strength? I figure I'd have an easier time getting my 8RM deadlift from 205 (guesstimate) to 280 than my 1RM deadlift from 280 (max) to 300, if prior experience is worth anything.

-Ross Hunt
10-08-2007, 11:38 AM
That's pretty much it.

My recovery stance is about where the guy in that video is. I step forward from there to perform the squat and then push off my lead foot as I complete it, and recover to that position. Go as deep as you can without turning your hips to one side; they should stay squared up and facing forward at all times. My depth is basically top of the hip joint parallel to the ground. I either touch the ground lightly with my knee, or stop just short of it. Usually, to keep myself honest, I do a couple reps out of each set where I touch, and a couple where I come just short.

Patrick Donnelly
10-12-2007, 02:12 PM
Ran some intervals today, testing times...
100m: 0:13
200m: 0:29
400m: 1:03

Need to get an 800m, 1200m, and 1600m time, along with improve those first few!

Patrick Donnelly
10-15-2007, 04:54 PM
Ran a 800m today. 2:40. Not nearly good enough! The first lap was terrible for some reason, coming in at ~1:25, the second one was much better.

In regard to weight gain, I reweighed myself last night (at my usual time, after I've eaten fully), and came in at 170 pounds. A few weeks ago I weighed ~178. It seems I've been slimming down significantly with Paleo/IF, and I have been able to tell the difference.

I figure I'd have an easier time getting my 8RM deadlift from 205 (guesstimate) to 280 than my 1RM deadlift from 280 (max) to 300, if prior experience is worth anything.

Wow. I tested my 8RM deadlift today and managed to hit 235. That's much better than I had expected... Maybe next week I'll test my 1RM too.

-Ross Hunt
10-28-2007, 05:30 PM
How's it going, Patrick?

Keep it up...

Patrick Donnelly
10-28-2007, 07:47 PM
I'm starting tomorrow, actually! http://img362.imageshack.us/img362/1091/iconwackobz7.gif

I had my final Cross Country race yesterday... It was... Well... It had rained hard for three days straight prior to the race... Yeah... It was... Muddy...

Here's the entry from my log:
http://www.americanparkour.com/smf/index.php?topic=5810.msg78655#msg78655

I'll keep updating in that log, but post any significant progress here too.

-Ross Hunt
10-29-2007, 01:15 PM
Cool; good luck.

LOL @ 'White Ninja,' ... sorry, couldn't help it. :D ;)

Patrick Donnelly
10-29-2007, 02:11 PM
Yeah, I started using that username a long time ago, though I've stopped reading the comics since.

Here was today:
Monday, 10/29/07

Warm-up:
- 10 knees to elbows
- 10 dumbbell overhead squats, 1x35#
- 10 GHD sit-ups, 35#
- mobility drills

Workout:
Track:
- 2x(200m:200m)
- 1x400m
Jump Squat:
- 1x6, 115#
- 1x6, 145#
- 1x6, 185#
Front Squat:
- 3x8, 115#
- 1x8, 125#
- 1x4, 135# (terminated the set)
Bench Press:
- 1x6, 115#
- 2x6, 135#
- 1x4+F, 135#

- 3x25 sumo-deadlift high pull, 60# (10 breaths rest)
- stretch


Notes:
- The 400m was timed at about 1:08 using my analogue watch. Bleh. The cross-wind definitely didn't help either. I need to focus more on getting short, quick paces. My form fell apart in the cold.
- The jump squats were easy... Really easy. It was the first time I had done then, so I didn't know what weight to start at.
- My digital watch battery died yesterday, leaving me unable to time a Tabata (or accurately time my 400m). Instead, I did 3x25 with 10 long breaths of rest in between each 25. It had a similar feeling. It also seems that it'd be good to do the pull Tabata on push-days and vice versa because of fatigue already built up from the lifting.


How heavy should jump squats be? I had no idea what weight to start at, but I probably could have gone to 225+. (I was doing them as shown here (http://performancemenu.com/resources/exercises/videos/aimeeJumpSquat.mov) , not full squats.)


And I sincerely apologize for being able to bench more than I can front squat! I'm sure as I get more used to front squats, that'll change.

-Ross Hunt
11-04-2007, 09:32 AM
Is white ninja a comic?

Anyhow; I don't know much about jump squats; I've never done them. I work the top of the olympic lifts mostly with hang and power variations, with occasional box work. I'm about to start doing some heavy partials, but that's more of a strength assistance exercise. If you posted a question on the exercises forum I'm sure somebody will have something to say.

FSQs go up fast as you get used to the rack.

Patrick Donnelly
11-05-2007, 07:22 PM
www.whiteninjacomics.com
It's just full of absurdly retarded comics which chronicle the story of a poorly drawn ninja, who does absolutely nothing ninja-like. Here's an example:

http://img110.imageshack.us/img110/6060/floatkb2.gif

Updates:
- Friday: I ran a 1200m in 4:10 (was trying to pace for 4:00). I know there are another 400m hiding in there somewhere. Now I just gotta find them!
- Saturday: In doing warm-up running drills to work on running technique before a 1600m, I stepped in a hole in the grass, fell, and rolled my ankle. I'm going pretty good now, and I'll be back to running on Wednesday.
- Monday (today): After seeing a Dan John video posted somewhere here recently, I fixed the way I squat. I was always squatting "on top of the legs" rather than "slung between the legs." So, now I can go deeper and with better form, but it also cut my lift by something between 20-35 pounds. 150# for an 8RM; that really needs improvement. Most of the load was felt in my glutes and hip flexors.

-Ross Hunt
11-08-2007, 06:34 AM
Good stuff; keep it up.

Squatting right is good and will pay off in the long run; ~5:30 mile pace is not a bad place to start at all.

Patrick Donnelly
11-10-2007, 03:29 PM
First 1600m today, on a cement bikepath. 5:32. It felt great.
- Running form was very nice.
- Pace was good, though it felt almost like coasting.
- Hamstrings/calves held off soreness until the last ~300m sprint, where I thought my legs were going to fall off.
- The main hold up was cardiovascular weakness, rather than muscular.
- I know what I want for my birthday this year... http://www.injinji.com/
Two pairs of those socks. It's cold wearing Vibrams!

Patrick Donnelly
11-16-2007, 03:17 PM
I've chosen a solid list of lifts to perform now.

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/9533/1600qw6.jpg

Snatches are being subbed for the original clean because my snatch form is better.
Psuedo-planche push-ups (on rings) are being subbed for the original ring dips because the PPPU has a better sense of full-body tension.


However, I do need to step back and examine my deadlifts. They were awfully weak today (couldn't even pull 8x225), and I'm feeling inflexible at the start position. Time to stretch...

Steven Low
12-17-2007, 01:57 AM
Thought you guys might want to read up on this thread we're having a discussion on similar topics on APK:

http://www.americanparkour.com/smf/index.php?topic=7311.0

Mike Dykstra
12-17-2007, 03:00 PM
In soccer to build up speed and endurance we do way more sprints than long distance running. We rarely ran more than a 5k.
An example would be tabata style sprints. 250m to 500m sprint 10x. Each sprint has to be under a minute and the only rest is the time you have left from the minute. at sprint number 4 you get an extra 20 secs of rest and at 8 you get an extra 30 seconds of rest.
Another good one that we did after the tabata type one or alone is if you have a field. You jog 4 sides of the field then next lap you sprint 1 side then jog 3, then sprint 2 jog 2, sprint 3 jog 1, sprint 4 2x. Then if you really want you go in reverse back to 1.
I have a bunch more work outs like this if you are interested.

Patrick Donnelly
12-17-2007, 04:01 PM
Crap! I forgot to mention it here when I completely changed my training protocol. Hahah, my bad.

I didn't like the way the higher rep stuff was feeling, so I moved to a low-rep, high set plan: three ME lift days a week (plus Tabatas), 1 PB MetCon day, 1 regular MetCon day.

I've noticed a decrease in my ability to run distances of 400m+, but my 200m time has dropped to a solid 30s now (from ~33s). Once I get to a solid 28s, I'm going to start tacking on 100m at a time. I'm running 3x200m after the warm-ups; once the times get more steady (not worsening like 30s, 31s, 33s), I'll up the volume too. Even though medium distance runs are getting harder, it simply isn't possible to run a 4:11.5 mile with a 200m of 33s.


I have a feeling that I'll have to begin including more MetCon in March, but not quite yet.