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Steve Liberati
09-29-2007, 12:38 PM
My wife and I have a decent amount of money saved from our wedding last yr and from our own personal savings. Right now it is sitting in ING collecting a 4.5% interest rate or so. We would like to take around $10K of it, and invest into something that will yield a higher rate of return than our current savings rate. We're also willing to take some risk with it ("not too risky though," as my wife likes to say ha). We are thinking about buying a rental property but concerned about the headaches involved.

Any suggestions? I know this is a fitness and nutrition forum...but figured since we so many bright and helpful folks reside at this board it only made cents to ask for your advice.

Thanks,

Steve

Greg Everett
09-29-2007, 01:10 PM
I have quite a bit of my money in stocks and mutual funds of vary risks and returns--"diversified" as they say. the majority is in mutual funds so i don't have to manage them, and i have about 2/3 in some decent return/low-risk funds--mutual discovery has been the best performer over the years. then i have some in a higher return but high risk UDPIX, which has done well for me to date, but basically if the dow eats it, so does the fund.

Steve Liberati
09-29-2007, 01:20 PM
cool thanks Greg. Only thing about stocks and mutuals funds are the stinking capital gains tax. Invested some money in the past into a various mutual funds and after Uncle Sam took out his portion, I was pretty much left with nothing. Not to mention the funds performance was sub par at best (around 6% or so). Net taxes came out to aro a 3-4% return:>(

Would like to hook up with a financial planner but for some reason don't have it in me. Most of them are money hungry pigs more interested in their return than they are in their clients. Guess you can say I'm a bit cynical when it comes to investing ha.

Neill Smith
09-29-2007, 02:05 PM
DISCLAIMER: I'm not a professional money manager.

If you're willing to invest some time, check out David Swenson's book (http://www.amazon.com/Unconventional-Success-Fundamental-Approach-Investment/dp/0743228383/ref=pd_bbs_2/103-1078599-1986224?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191099338&sr=8-2). It's one of the best out there on personal money management. If you're lazy like I am, stick with index funds. They historically perform better than mutual funds for various reasons. A total market fund from Fidelity or Vanguard will do the trick. The next, slightly more complex step is to allocate some capital for real estate and international investments (again in index funds). I would have to look up the latest recommended allocations.

Dave Paton
09-29-2007, 09:03 PM
Try a fee-only financial advisor. They don't try to sell you a product, you just pay for their advice.

Also, my good friend who makes a lot of money working at a hedge fund claims that mutual funds are NOT the best way to go because of the fees that the fund managers take from you. He suggests an index fund (like someone suggested) because you save a lot on the manager's fees. You may want to check more into that. Unfortunately, I can't invest in his hedge fund because you need like $5 million to invest upfront. Who was it that said the rich get richer?????

Frank Needham
09-30-2007, 06:56 AM
There are some great ways to invest without spending your whole life being involved in watching what is going on continually. A couple such ways are ETFs and Index shares. Here's a link to the AMEX: http://www.amex.com/?href=/etf/prodInf/EtPiMain.jsp where you can learn about ETFs. Index shares are basically a tracking stock. Fo an example, check out Spiders on the intro page of the link above. If you want to be more involved there is always the AAII http://www.aaii.com/, a non-profit group for indivdual investing with some great resources. If you want to really get involved you would do well to read the Berkshire Hathaway shareholder letters at http://www.berkshirehathaway.com/letters/letters.html.

Steve Liberati
09-30-2007, 11:39 AM
Thanks Neil, Dave, and Frank. I really appreciate the advice.

Derek Simonds
09-30-2007, 03:31 PM
I second the ETF advice. I have 2 totally different strategies one long term an annuity for retirement and 2 ETF's so that I can maintain a fair amount of liquidity for other types of investments.

If you want to ask someone questions my brother in law is a money grubbing certified financial planner and he would answer any questions for you.

kevin mckay
10-05-2007, 02:46 PM
My wife and I have a decent amount of money saved from our wedding last yr and from our own personal savings. Right now it is sitting in ING collecting a 4.5% interest rate or so. We would like to take around $10K of it, and invest into something that will yield a higher rate of return than our current savings rate. We're also willing to take some risk with it ("not too risky though," as my wife likes to say ha). We are thinking about buying a rental property but concerned about the headaches involved.

Any suggestions? I know this is a fitness and nutrition forum...but figured since we so many bright and helpful folks reside at this board it only made cents to ask for your advice.

Thanks,

Steve

why not by a foreclosure property next year when people start defaulting on their mortgages it is supposed to peek around mid 08

Greg Davis
10-05-2007, 04:34 PM
Depending on where you are located and your time constraints... consider real estate. Great investment IMO if you are able to rent a place out. If you have access to a student area in particular... maybe you can capitalize on the price rut down there in the US?

Steve Liberati
10-05-2007, 06:24 PM
Agree that real estate is where its at. Only problem is that it requires a larger investment of one's time, which I'm short on right now. But certainly something I like to grab a piece of before I grow old and retire.