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View Full Version : Are we REALLY mimicing the paleo diet


Greg Battaglia
01-02-2008, 11:09 PM
Just yesterday I was watching a television show about indigenous peoples from Papua New Guinea. The program was not specifically about primitive diets, but throughout the episode the tribesmen and women were shown eating and their diet was discussed briefly. I paid attention to how they prepared and ate their food and noticed that they did nothing to add flavor to their food. Everything was eaten plain. If they ate tubers they simply cooked them and chowed down. If they killed some swine they cut open the stomach and cooked the organs, then chowed. If they ate some sago they simply grabbed a piece and chomped on it. They weren't throwing anything in a pan with olive oil and some spices or scrambling any eggs. Everything was very plain and simple. Now, I've always used spices and herbs and I'm a huge fan of stir frying with either olive oil or GF butter, but this got me to thinking that it might be more Paleo to just eat the stuff plain, as unappetizing as that sounds. I think it might be a nice change since I've been doing lots of stir frying for so long and it may simplify things. Sustainability might be an issue, but if the H/G's can do it, then why not? Anybody eat this way regularly? I'm thinking along the lines of:
grill your steak lightly, no salt, pep, or spices
grab a handful of raw nuts
chew on some raw leaves (spinach, collard greens, arugala, etc)
snag up and apple or pear, maybe some carrots

Just eating everything plain really.

Chris Forbis
01-03-2008, 02:22 AM
I am pretty close to this during the week. Of course, this is largely due to me wishing to minimize time spent preparing food. I will lightly cook some beef, and then eat it with some fresh ground pepper. Raw nuts and steamed veggies with it.

Steve Liberati
01-03-2008, 04:58 AM
When I was into body building I could remember eating everything plain with very little flavor using food strictly as a function rather than something to be enjoyed. Chicken and oats and a glass of water. Looking back I'm so glad my diet has evolved to include color, flavor, taste, variety, and balance. I think there is a lot to learn from Art DeVaney's in this respect, applying the paleolithic lifestyle into modern times. I can honestly say my standards of living (and health) have greatly improved since opening my mind to new food palates outside the confines of dull food eaten to satisfy my protein requirements. I don't think true hunter gather cultures are any better off then we are in terms of health for not having regular access to spices, herbs and a wide of array of healthy food. If they did, I'm sure they would make the most of it just as well as we do.

Mike ODonnell
01-03-2008, 06:47 AM
I use a laptop...so I am not living Paleo 100%....

Life is about enjoing taste and food...nothing wrong with those simple pleasures.

That and Guinness is Paleo!

Jane Michel
01-03-2008, 08:01 AM
When I was into body building I could remember eating everything plain with very little flavor using food strictly as a function rather than something to be enjoyed. Chicken and oats and a glass of water.

Same thing here. Boiled chicken, rolled oats with lowfat milk, salad with just olive oil. This is strange actually... I'm not sure whether I tolerate such blandness now. But are the indigenous people from Papua able to do it because they've never eaten things loaded with things like salt and sugar?

Eric Kerr
01-03-2008, 10:32 AM
But are the indigenous people from Papua able to do it because they've never eaten things loaded with things like salt and sugar?

Meaning they haven't eaten from the Tree of Spicy Yumminess yet so they don't know what they are missing? Interesting thought.

I'd also guess that critters that eat what they were designed to eat and run around gathering it like they were designed to do taste a bit different than critters that were raised in a cage and fed whatever we concocted for them to eat.

Also eating in-season makes a difference in flavor. For example eating beef in the fall/early winter after it had a put on some fat in preparation for winter.

Greg Battaglia
01-03-2008, 01:49 PM
Good points. Plus, some could argue that spices and herbs are actually beneficial, as opposed to eating food plain, due to their antioxidants, phytochemicals, etc. I think the concept mainly caught my interest due to the fact that I'm boring my self to tears eating the same combo's, cooked the same way, day in and day out. I'm going to try throw in some steaming and grilling this next week for variety. By the way, anybody try Robb's Broccoli Basil Scramble from his blog? Very simple, quick, and tasty. Try it out if you haven't. Scott Hagnas has some tasty looking meals on his blog as well that I may try in the near future to add some variety.

Scott Kustes
01-03-2008, 02:08 PM
It's also possible that they eat the way they do of necessity, not choice. Kinda like our ancestors eating mastodons and leaves rather than pancakes and Pop-Tarts. They would probably opt for the sugary overload too if they could.