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View Full Version : getting the ACE cert a bad idea?


Anton Emery
01-03-2008, 11:12 AM
I have a question for the more experienced trainers/coaches out there. Do you all think getting the ACE cert is bad idea? I am about 3/4 through the book and study guide, and find alot of it very boring. The basic anatomy and physiology is good, as well as the kinesiology, but alot of exercise programming seems to be garbage. I picked it because i don't know where my path towards being a trainer will take me, and i figured having some sort of nationally accredited cert would be needed, plus its easier to get insurance. I am also going to be attending the P Menu O-lifting seminar in Portland and plan to get to a Crossfit cert when i can.

Do you more experienced folks look down on people that have the ACE cert? It seems like most of the coaches and trainers that i admire have the NSCA, and sometimes the CSCS.

I am looking at the ACE cert more as a piece of paper that says i am "certified" and a means of insurance, than anything else. Since i am almost done i should probably just finish it.


Anton

Greg Everett
01-03-2008, 12:01 PM
ALL of the certs, including CSCS, are lame. In my opinion, at least. But for no other reason than getting good training insurance, you should get one. Which doesn't really matter - I've never in my life had a client ask - so do what's convenient.

Mike ODonnell
01-03-2008, 01:44 PM
Certs are a scam (as they want you to spend money year after year) but something has to be done to give trainers credibility. I got my cert a while back and will never recertify on the same test just so they can get another $300. Please. NSCA-CPT or ACE is good, ISSA or AFAA could work as well....just depends if you are planning on working for yourself then it may not even matter as Greg said, if you try to work for someone else then they may want a certain cert. CSCS is pretty mandatory if you plan on working with athletes or at a school. Liability is also needed...but ironically you do not even need to be certified to get liability insurance. However worst case scenario if you ever go to court and are not certified, you are most likely screwed.

Barney Ring
01-31-2008, 02:41 PM
I have my ACE cert. My employer paid for it (fire department), that is the best part about it. It helped with insurance for a Crossfit affiliate.

The worst part is I have to keep up with continuing ed hours. I will not be pursuing any other mainstream certs.

Mike ODonnell
01-31-2008, 02:58 PM
The worst part is I have to keep up with continuing ed hours. I will not be pursuing any other mainstream certs.

I stopped doing that a long time ago....as you can have insurance without the cert.

Matt Lawson
02-04-2008, 05:02 AM
this is a disheartening thread for someone who has been cramming for the CSCS. what makes it lame? im pretty much doing it for the insurance as well so i cant really gripe about it that much. I plan on getting my CF lvl 1 cert some time soon too.

Garrett Smith
02-04-2008, 05:16 AM
Matt,
Do it for the insurance, sure. Just don't expect being a CSCS to mean that you've learned a whole lot about S&C, if you know what I mean.

One way I might put it is that the CSCS is the "least lame" trainer cert out there.

All certs are lame--note that both Greg and I both still carry it though. It does have its value.

Mike ODonnell
02-04-2008, 07:44 AM
CSCS is probably the best and more versatile credential to get. All depends on who you want to work for, if you are self employed it wont matter much as the general public really has no idea about the difference between any of them. If you want to work for a school or other place, the CSCS is the one to get.

Matt Lawson
02-04-2008, 10:21 AM
for the most part i assume that most of what i learn that proves to be useful will be soaked up from the brilliant practitioners out there and the great trainers/coaches. i'm planning something of an educational road trip towards the beggining of the summer. I want to visit cali and get my CF cert and do some O lift training at Mike's Gym but that is still in the "how the hell am i going to afford this" stage. Travel is an expensive mofo. If anyone has any thoughts on this i would be much appreciative.

Garrett Smith
02-04-2008, 11:59 AM
Use this board and the CF board to find people who are willing to put you up during your (short) visits.

Bring your food, non-perishable, with you or buy it there. Eat out as little as possible.

I can't help with the gas issue, nor with the cert expenses.

Matt Lawson
02-04-2008, 02:56 PM
you guys rock!

Dave Paton
02-05-2008, 01:19 PM
There's also many other places to learn O-lifting than Mike's Gym. Check with USAW for a local club.

Anton Emery
03-21-2008, 03:29 PM
I recently had another thought with regards to getting the ACE cert. This may kind of far fetched, but i believe in covering all my bases.

In the ACE textbook and in the code of ethics, as i seem to recall, they recommend against giving nutritional advice. They say refer to a qualified nutritionist or dietician. True, i guess, but what if i my clients just want somewhere basic to start, or have zone or paleo questions. Say i have the ACE, give them advice, then they get sick or something and decide to sue me. In court the lawyer looks at the ACE handbook and asks why did i give nutritional advice when it says not to. Perhaps a far fetched situation i know, but it could happen and i seem to recall reading it somewhere.

Should this be reason enough not to get the ACE cert. I was seriously considering the NSCA CPT anyways, no serious trainers seem to have the ACE. I did spend a few months studying for the ACE exam, so i would hate to have wasted that time, but i did learn stuff, and in reality i cant really start trying to train others until i get my Crossfit cert in May. So starting to work towards the NSCA CPT would not be to big of a deal.



Anton

Mike ODonnell
03-21-2008, 04:01 PM
By national LAW you can NOT give anyone specific nutrition advice unless you are a licensed dietician. You can give someone a zone book and let them figure out what to eat on their own or tell them what foods they "should" enjoy and ones to "try to avoid", but you can not tell them what to eat specifically. So it doesn't matter what CPT you have, you are not a licensed dietician. How you tap dance around that subject is up to you as many people seem to ignore it....but doesnt mean it wont come back to bite you in the ass later. Think of it in terms of presenting nutrition for "educational purposes" only....not a specific individualized plan.

Patrick Donnelly
03-22-2008, 10:47 AM
no serious trainers seem to have the ACE.

No serious trainers take their cert seriously.


Speaking of which, I just finished my ACE-GFI cert, so I'm selling the materials... $135 shipped anywhere in the 48 states. You've got the manual, with highlighted annotations (helped me a lot while reviewing), the study guide (did most of it lightly in pencil, but erased it for you), anatomy and human movement guide, and the practice test. All in great/perfect condition. It cost $157 including shipping originally. I scored an 88% on the test, easily, with just those materials. Email patrickhdonnelly@hotmail.com if you're interested.


Okay. Ad's over.

Patrick Donnelly
03-23-2008, 04:46 PM
It just occurred to me...

Even the official CrossFit Level 1 certification is BS. The only reason you'd ever want to get it is if you're affiliating. At this point, with all the different things included in CF, all the certifications can offer is a general knowledge of how to perform the movements correctly yourself, and not instruction on how to coach them. You can get the same teaching at an affiliate gym for a lot less than $1000 and traveling expenses.

Kevin Perry
03-23-2008, 06:39 PM
It just occurred to me...

Even the official CrossFit Level 1 certification is BS. The only reason you'd ever want to get it is if you're affiliating. At this point, with all the different things included in CF, all the certifications can offer is a general knowledge of how to perform the movements correctly yourself, and not instruction on how to coach them. You can get the same teaching at an affiliate gym for a lot less than $1000 and traveling expenses.

This is kind of one reason why I have been putting a cert off for a while. MY school has a personal training program andI get plent of instruction from my own coach so the only time to really get a CF cert would be like you said. Durring affiliation.