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Ben Moskowitz
02-26-2008, 12:00 PM
Isn't it hard to assess food allergies and stuff unless you blindfold yourself?

Also, if I tolerate dairy perfectly fine now, is it actually a good idea to risk being able to not tolerate it? I've heard that people can go lactose intolerant after an extended period of not having dairy.

I am aware of the insulin spiking effect of dairy, and I'll try to limit it to PWO time.

I guess the same thing about peppers and "getting all sinusy" is a bad idea.

Mike ODonnell
02-26-2008, 01:04 PM
Just because you are able to tolerate it now doesn't mean it is good for you long term. Example I drank tons of milk as a kid, played sports, but always had sinusitis....I stop drinking milk after college (1993) and now don't have issue with my sinusitis....but if I have too much dairy I get all mucusy and asmtha breathing issues during exercise.

My body probably wanted to give me the warning signs long ago....but it got drowned out.....but since I cleared my system, it was able to give me simple signs to warn me. I am not lactose intollerant but know that me and milk are not ideal for long term health. It's the simple warnings that are just an inconvience....it's what comes next that you don't know about after ignoring the simple warnings that spells trouble in the long term.

If you want to cycle it during periods of mass gain or pwo, then go ahead. Long term though I can do without it (although I still have cheese here and there).....but no more milkshakes!

Garrett Smith
02-26-2008, 02:18 PM
Ben,
There are always the blood tests for food allergies, no blindfold needed!

With dairy, it is commonly accepted that a period of 3 weeks of complete avoidance prior to re-introduction is necessary to assess "tolerance" or hypersensitivity symptoms. Note that this is longer than with any other food group.

Some people claim they suffer no ill side effects from excessive sugar consumption--their energy appears to be fine, they aren't getting fat, etc.--then they get Alzheimer's later in life (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/17/health/17alzheimer.html).

Being sensitive to how one's body reacts is a positive in my book, making reactions obvious. If one isn't sensitive, then they have to rely on knowledge or lab testing, both of which can be inaccurate.

Pasteurized and/or heavily processed dairy (whey is a heavily processed food, no matter how it is looked at) are not healthy foods.

Craig Snyder
02-26-2008, 04:13 PM
Some people claim they suffer no ill side effects from excessive sugar consumption--their energy appears to be fine, they aren't getting fat, etc.--then they get Alzheimer's later in life (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/17/health/17alzheimer.html).



Dr. G

That is a really good article. Thanks for posting that.

Craig