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View Full Version : Probiotics and Paleo... a waste?


Corey Duvall
04-16-2008, 02:57 PM
I recently looked at the cultures that are in the probiotics formula I take and it contains Lactobacillus cultures. Wouldn't a lactobacillus culture utilize lactose... the milk sugar? If you're not ingesting milk, why would you need the lactobacillus? Or perhaps I need to find another culture.

Mike ODonnell
04-16-2008, 04:39 PM
I recently looked at the cultures that are in the probiotics formula I take and it contains Lactobacillus cultures. Wouldn't a lactobacillus culture utilize lactose... the milk sugar? If you're not ingesting milk, why would you need the lactobacillus? Or perhaps I need to find another culture.

taken from a manufacturer's site

Are your probiotics lactose free?
Lactobacillus denotes ”lactic acid producing” or “acid loving.” The term “Lacto” does not indicate a relation to lactose or dairy, as is commonly misunderstood. Lactose may be used in the medium to grow the probiotic culture; however, this is completely removed from the final product.

Are your probiotics GI tract stable?
Lactobacilli probiotics are GI tract stable by nature. That is a given according to an understanding of digestion and the nature of probiotics. Some of the bacteria will be lost in transit, but the vast majority survive the GI tract. This is especially true when taken during times when the digestive system is dormant, such as first thing in the morning and at bedtime. When digestion is not in progress, the stomach pH is closer to neutral. Only in the peak of digestion does it hit 2.0 - 3.0, and even then some probiotics survive.

and from Univ of MD Med Ctr site (http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/lactobacillus-000310.htm)
Lactobacillus acidophilus ( L. acidophilus ) is the most commonly used probiotic, or "friendly" bacteria. Such healthy bacteria inhabit the intestines and vagina and protect against the entrance and proliferation of "bad" organisms that can cause disease. This is accomplished through a variety of mechanisms. For example, the breakdown of food by L. acidophilus leads to production of lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other byproducts that make the environment hostile for undesired organisms. L. acidophilus also produces lactase, the enzyme that breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugars.

So yes, you need it even if you don't drink milk.

Garrett Smith
04-16-2008, 05:40 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactobacillus