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View Full Version : What's a Good Vertical Leap?


Scott Kustes
04-19-2008, 10:18 AM
A couple weeks back, I started training for the Bluegrass State Games Track and Field competition in July. As part of explosiveness training, I'm doing box jumps, but today I decided to measure my standing vertical to see what, if any, improvements there are over the next 13 weeks. Before I say what it is, what is considered a good vertical (don't want to taint people into saying "that's not bad" if it really is)? 20"? 25"? 30"? 35"?

Also, what's considered a respectable box jump?

Steven Low
04-19-2008, 10:36 AM
Box jumps aren't that great. As far as increasing your vert/broad stay away from there.

Don't go to failure in ANY plyo training. Sprinting definitely helps as will depth drops and other various bounding plyo. Minimize contact time in either eccentric-isometric or eccentric-concentric phases. Check out Kelly Baggett's stuff for this.

Is this like a regular competition or like a meet for like high school or college? Depends. Not sure why you want to increase vert as it's not a component of any event in T&F though... long jump and high jump are similar but not exactly the same with the latter requiring more technique at least a high school level probably.

30" is well above average for normal people. 36" is what I'd consider very good (most football players that need explosiveness are around there). Of course 40+ is like elite level..

Scott Kustes
04-19-2008, 11:07 AM
It's an amateur event with age groups. The vertical jump is inconsequential to the track events...this is more of a general information question.

Dave Van Skike
04-19-2008, 02:08 PM
Box jumps aren't that great. As far as increasing your vert/broad stay away from there.

Don't go to failure in ANY plyo training. Sprinting definitely helps as will depth drops and other various bounding plyo. Minimize contact time in either eccentric-isometric or eccentric-concentric phases. Check out Kelly Baggett's stuff for this.

Is this like a regular competition or like a meet for like high school or college? Depends. Not sure why you want to increase vert as it's not a component of any event in T&F though... long jump and high jump are similar but not exactly the same with the latter requiring more technique at least a high school level probably.

30" is well above average for normal people. 36" is what I'd consider very good (most football players that need explosiveness are around there). Of course 40+ is like elite level..

what's wrong with box jumps?

Steven Low
04-19-2008, 02:48 PM
what's wrong with box jumps?
The way CF uses them... as a metcon exercise.

http://www.board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=30586


Anyway, again, google Kelly Baggett and read his articles.

Scott Kustes
04-19-2008, 03:32 PM
OH...yes, I am not using them as CF uses them. I am using them as maximum explosiveness. Measured today, my standing vertical is 27". That's no run-up, no drop step, just plant feet, dip and drive (not sure how verticals are typically measured...drop step? stationary?). PR on box jump today was 42", but I think I can go another 2-3" given that I can get high enough to make it well onto the box.

Steven Low
04-19-2008, 04:10 PM
Okay, good.

There's different ways of testing vertical (from rebound, standing, one step then obviously the variations of one leg vs. two leg). So it really depends on what you're talking about.

Check out Kelly Baggett's stuff!

Dave Van Skike
04-19-2008, 05:08 PM
The way CF uses them... as a metcon exercise.

http://www.board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=30586


Anyway, again, google Kelly Baggett and read his articles.

Hmmm. Those look stupid, not what I was thinking of.

This is the box jump I was thinking of.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Qsl3u59AqA at 20 seconds

Mike ODonnell
04-19-2008, 09:40 PM
hence why I stick to sports that require no vertical....

Box jumps are not all about the "true" verical power...as you can also jump on a higher box just by getting your feet higher. (aka bringing your knees more into your chest and not really improving overall vertical height....but then again...I can't jump)

Scott Kustes
04-20-2008, 05:20 AM
True MOD, you can get a higher box without improving vertical. Box jumps are somewhat similar to cleans in the use of the hips (someone more intimate with cleans feel free to smack me for that) as you have to dip-quickly open and drive-quickly close, similar to the knee rebend-second pull-third pull. However, I think anyone that can get a 50" box jump is going to have a pretty impressive vertical as well.

Steven, going back and rereading Kelly's stuff. Is there something in particular that you think would be beneficial? As you talked about in that CF thread, my training is not focused on CF at all right now...very sport-specific. Most of my training days are short speed sessions, tempo runs, and speed-endurance (different days ;)), with lifting days focused on WSBB Max Effort and Dynamic Effort squats and deadlifts, with some supplemental hang power cleans, along with plyometrics. In fact, the only CF I'll be doing will be any WODs done at the certification this coming weekend.

Steven Low
04-20-2008, 07:55 AM
It depends on what event they're gonna have at the competition. If it's like one step into vertical you should train like that. If it's just standing then there's different way to train for that. Same with a full run.. depends on two feet or one foot... Need to really specify for that.

Scott Kustes
04-20-2008, 12:38 PM
The competition is 100m, 200m, and 400m sprints. Nothing to do with vertical jump other than that vertical jump carries over to the explosiveness required for sprinting and vice versa. This was merely a thread intended to discern what a decent vertical and box jump are.

Steven Low
04-20-2008, 02:27 PM
:eek:

You'd get more out of just sprinting and working on your mechanics than training vertical or working on jumping explosiveness.

Here's a nice blog on jumping though
http://jumpcoach.blogspot.com/

Scott Kustes
04-21-2008, 07:36 AM
I am training plenty on spriting and mechanics and tempo and speed-endurance and all kinds of other fun stuff. That is what most of my training is devoted to. This is a purely informational thread asking the question in the title. However, every high-level sprint coach involves plyometrics and explosiveness training beyond mere acceleration and blocks work.

Thanks for the link...I'll check it out.