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View Full Version : Usain Bolt is inhuman...


Allen Yeh
08-18-2008, 10:06 AM
Holy....9.69

http://www.nbcolympics.com/video/player.html?assetid=0816_hd_atm_hl_l0686&channelcode=sportat

He made it look easy.

Steven Low
08-18-2008, 10:57 AM
With an untied shoe... and celebrating for 20m. Thing is the guy gets as good a start as the other people. But his top end speed is ridiculous. Has to be at least 3 m/s higher than the other competitors which is INSANE!

I'm looking forward to the 200m final as well as the 4x100m relay.

Derek Weaver
08-18-2008, 11:35 AM
Yeah, I had a feeling he was going to do something awesome in the 100m during the semis when he ran, I think it was a 9.92, and looked like he was jogging.

Only 21 also... could be in for some huge things.

Scott Kustes
08-18-2008, 01:01 PM
His start was actually the slowest in the field by about .02 seconds. Yet he still ran away from them like he was racing me. As Derek said, he's not even in his prime yet.

So I ran an 11.64 recently...that makes me 83% as fast as Usain Bolt. It doesn't sound so bad when you put it in those terms. :D

Derek Simonds
08-18-2008, 01:04 PM
Scott I am proud to say that I know someone that is that close percentage wise to the fastest man in the world. An 11.64 is nothing to sneeze at either. Nice work.

Allen Yeh
08-19-2008, 04:52 AM
He looked good in the 200m semi's, he did his what seems like customary slow down 15m's from the finish line.

It's really insane to me that this was his first year running the 100m???

Darryl Shaw
08-19-2008, 05:30 AM
Maybe the secret of his success lies in his race day preparation -

"I woke up at 11, sat around, watched TV, then I had lunch, some nuggets, then I pretty much went back to my room and slept for another three hours, went back, got some more nuggets, and then I came to the track,"

http://www.reuters.com/article/GCA-Olympics/idUSSP32934320080816?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0&sp=true

Garrett Smith
08-19-2008, 06:42 AM
Call me cynical, but either those Jamaican runners (as a whole) have the most incredible gifts for the 100m, or more likely IMO is that they have figured out some way to cheat that no one can put their finger on.

Their dominance as a team should be setting off alarm bells.

As for the Chinese gymnasts, it's either just incompetent or downright crooked judging.

Scott Kustes
08-19-2008, 07:01 AM
As Charlie Francis himself has said, no one at that level is winning without a little something extra. It may be cynical, but I don't think improved nutrition and training techniques alone can account for the fact that times just keep dropping.

It's like Tyson Gay and Michael Phelps that are like "I submit to extra drug testing." To the layperson, that sounds amazing..."see, that's how we know they're clean." The average person doesn't realize that drug testing is REACTIONARY and the best athletes have the newest designer drugs that the testers haven't figured out how to find yet....see: The Clear. Clearing a drug test may mean they're clean or may mean they are using something that isn't known about yet.

Frank Needham
08-19-2008, 07:03 AM
Call me cynical, but either those Jamaican runners (as a whole) have the most incredible gifts for the 100m, or more likely IMO is that they have figured out some way to cheat that no one can put their finger on.

Their dominance as a team should be setting off alarm bells.

As for the Chinese gymnasts, it's either just incompetent or downright crooked judging.

Your're cynical, there, you happy now :D I know what mean but, if they are legit that Usain is one stud for sure. He reminds me of a colt just getting started in life, out in the pasture just running and kicking for fun. He's in his own world.

Allen Yeh
08-19-2008, 07:06 AM
Can we not steer this into a doping discussion. I'm naive and still try to see the world with rose colored glasses as much as I can. It seems that every thread I've stumbled upon on different forums always at some point starts to talk about doping....etc

Derek Weaver
08-19-2008, 11:00 AM
I agree Allen. I'd like to appreciate the feats and start wondering later.

Sometimes people are just that good. Not to mention that track and swimming are both sports that have never had records stand up for a long period of time.

I do believe he had a little something extra though... those chicken nuggets are like jet fuel.

Patrick Donnelly
08-19-2008, 11:30 AM
The guy's running technique is amazing. It's a great example for those who need a visual of forefoot strike running.

Garrett Smith
08-19-2008, 11:55 AM
How tiny Jamaica develops so many champion sprinters (http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0628/p01s01-woam.html)

I wonder if as many technological improvements have been made to the track at the Bird's Nest as were made for the pool in the Water Cube...

Scott Borre
08-19-2008, 12:13 PM
Well there are slow and fast tracks. I think I heard that this one is a fairly fast track.

Garrett Smith
08-19-2008, 12:42 PM
It's definitely a fast pool, I am yet to read about the track...

What is behind the record-breaking spree at Water Cube? (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-08/15/content_9365898.htm)

Oh wait, here's something...

The technology of athletics tracks (http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/node/2139/full)

Gant Grimes
08-19-2008, 02:40 PM
Mutation: it is the key to our evolution. It has enabled us to evolve from a single-celled organism into the dominant species on the planet. This process is slow, and normally taking thousands and thousands of years. But every few hundred millennia, evolution leaps forward.

Doping or not, it's pretty relative.

1. He's using, and he beat a pool of other athletes--some of which are using--by a hell of a lot.

or

2. He's not using, and he beat a pool of other athletes--some of which are using--by a hell of a lot.

Either way, he's not the only one using.

9.69 is...unreal.

Garrett Smith
08-19-2008, 03:20 PM
Let's not forget the women's 100m (http://www.nbcolympics.com/trackandfield/news/newsid=226926.html):

It was the widest margin of victory in an Olympic women's 100 final since 1988, when Florence Griffith-Joyner set the world record.

All three medals to Jamaica. Either they're doing everything right, or they've figured out how not to do what everyone else is doing wrong (note in the article about Bolt above where the Jamaican coach said all his runners come back from NCAA schools "tired and mediocre").

Derek Weaver
08-19-2008, 04:52 PM
Looks like this thread has gone the "is he doping?" route.

I'll chip in. Maybe I am naive, but I think that the majority of athletes aren't doping. A wave of dominance can be just that... dominance.

Not to mention that we're talking about the Jamaicans a historically poor island nation with little else to do. From the sounds of it, Jamaican high school track and field is equivalent in popularity and importance to high school football in Texas and Florida.

Even with their sponsorships they aren't nearly as flush with cash to find ways to cheat as the top notch U.S. track and field athletes... see Marion Jones who was making huge money from endorsements.

Not that it can't happen... just that I doubt that the Jamaicans are putting big resources into designer PED's

Dave Van Skike
08-19-2008, 05:10 PM
He owes it all to Methyphenidate, Winstrol and Crossfit......Just kidding



It was a thing of beauty to watch, truly.

Scott Borre
08-19-2008, 06:49 PM
Well its almost without doubt that Florence Griffith-Joyner was doping. From average (among elites) to elite among elites in such a short time... unless some technical error was corrected that caused it (which they never claimed), there's little else to suspect.

But whatever. I think that Bolt is legit. He's an amazing runner. His 100m splits in the 200m are faster than some of the Olympians qualifying times for the 100.

Matt Edwards
08-19-2008, 09:27 PM
Any idea what his training is like? I read somewhere today, maybe on this site, that Jamaican coaches noted that when their athletes came back from college in the States, that they came back "tired." This leads me to believe that their training has much less volume and much more resting?

Steven Low
08-19-2008, 11:18 PM
Any idea what his training is like? I read somewhere today, maybe on this site, that Jamaican coaches noted that when their athletes came back from college in the States, that they came back "tired." This leads me to believe that their training has much less volume and much more resting?
I am pretty curious as well. Hopefully someone can find it. :)

Darryl Shaw
08-20-2008, 06:34 AM
I read a short article in the paper yesterday by a sport scientist who suggested that Bolt's height might be what gives him such an enormous advantage. It went on to say that at 6'5'' Bolt is taller than the average sprinter so his long legs mean that he not only travels further than the competition with every stride but he needs to take fewer strides over the distance.

Scott Borre
08-20-2008, 06:55 AM
Yes he's taller. But I'm not sure if this is it. As its rare for tall athletes to run that fast. There's a reason that Randy Moss is a freak.

But even if he takes less strides, this doesn't seem consistent with the running technique of Michael Johnson, where stride length isn't so much where the speed comes from. But it will be interesting to see if the sport starts to move to taller runners (an article I read while posting stated that in the past Bolt was considered to tall, and was told so, partly due to how it was thought to be more difficult for tall runners to get up to speed quickly from the blocks).

James Evans
08-20-2008, 07:38 AM
And he's just won again:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/olympics/athletics/7572131.stm

Craig Loizides
08-20-2008, 08:49 AM
Let's not forget the women's 100m (http://www.nbcolympics.com/trackandfield/news/newsid=226926.html):



All three medals to Jamaica. Either they're doing everything right, or they've figured out how not to do what everyone else is doing wrong (note in the article about Bolt above where the Jamaican coach said all his runners come back from NCAA schools "tired and mediocre").

Actually, the US women just didn't run well. If they ran the same times they ran at the US trials, the US would have taken 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. The fastest US time of 11.03 is the slowest in an olympics since 1976 and slower than any world championships except 1987 and 2001. The winners time was very good, but the silver and bronze wouldn't have medaled in a number of olympics and world championships.

Overall, times have been slower since 2001 in the women's 100 than from 1985 to 2000. If anything you could argue that there is less cheating now. I also think track and field performances are closer to the limit of performance than in some other sports (especially swimming) where records seem to get broken every year. It's natural to have periods of higher and lower performances instead of constant new records.

I'm looking forward to 200 final. No one has even approached Michael Johnson's time since Atlanta.

James Evans
08-20-2008, 09:04 AM
I'm looking forward to 200 final. No one has even approached Michael Johnson's time since Atlanta.

They have now. 19.30.

Garrett Smith
08-20-2008, 09:33 AM
Maybe overtraining and poor peaking is what Jamaica has done quite well in avoiding...

James Evans
08-20-2008, 09:38 AM
It's the yams.

Dave Paton
08-20-2008, 02:28 PM
Alan Webb quit the University of Michigan after his freshman year because he was being "overtrained". However, he didn't even make the olympic team this year and his fellow U of M runner Nick Willis won the bronze for New Zealand in the 1500m while still being coached by the Michigan coach. So in yo face Webb. (did i mention i am a U of M grad?)

JW Luckett
08-21-2008, 01:26 AM
It's the yams.

It's the truth! I just saw a TV news program here that sent a crew to Bolt's home in Jamaica and his sister pointed out the yams as the secret ingredient.

Must eat more yams.

Allen Yeh
08-21-2008, 06:00 AM
Alan Webb quit the University of Michigan after his freshman year because he was being "overtrained". However, he didn't even make the olympic team this year and his fellow U of M runner Nick Willis won the bronze for New Zealand in the 1500m while still being coached by the Michigan coach.

He hails from the town I lived in for 3 years...only just moved.

Last year he beat the American WR with 3:46.9.

So in yo face Webb. (did i mention i am a U of M grad?)

We won't hold that against you.

Tom Rawls
08-21-2008, 06:27 AM
Alan Webb quit the University of Michigan after his freshman year because he was being "overtrained". However, he didn't even make the olympic team this year and his fellow U of M runner Nick Willis won the bronze for New Zealand in the 1500m while still being coached by the Michigan coach. So in yo face Webb. (did i mention i am a U of M grad?)

As I recall, Webb believed he was "over-raced" and under-trained.

That is to say, they raced cross country in the fall, raced indoors in the winter, and then raced outdoors in the spring. The intercollegiate program was racing more than training--going fast in the here and now, which wasn't best suited toward long-term development.

I can imagine intercollegiate competition could grind a young athlete too fine.

Scott Kustes
08-22-2008, 11:15 AM
Yes he's taller. But I'm not sure if this is it. As its rare for tall athletes to run that fast. There's a reason that Randy Moss is a freak.

But even if he takes less strides, this doesn't seem consistent with the running technique of Michael Johnson, where stride length isn't so much where the speed comes from. But it will be interesting to see if the sport starts to move to taller runners (an article I read while posting stated that in the past Bolt was considered to tall, and was told so, partly due to how it was thought to be more difficult for tall runners to get up to speed quickly from the blocks).
Very true about tall runners. That's why he's only been running the 100m for a year. Tall guys are typically slower out of the blocks, which is the area he worked his ass off to shore up. He's still slow out of the blocks in comparison, but his unbelievable top speed and acceleration pick it up for him.

As for stride length, it is THE predominant determinant of speed. Charlie Francis points out that increasing stride length is a much more fruitful endeavor than increasing stride turnover (the two combined create "speed"). If you watch the fastest and slowest runners, leg turnover rate is very similar. Stride length is the difference....stride length = power generation.

Scott Borre
08-22-2008, 12:26 PM
Scott, I wasn't referring to the distance covered in between strides. I was referring to one's own natural stride length. Michael Johnson did not reach with his legs to cover more ground, but he had great power off the ground and his legs moved quickly. I'm not sure if longer legs would improve this or not.

BTW interesting articles:

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/articles/scni46a3.htm

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/economy.htm

and

http://www.trackandfieldnews.com/technique/109-Frank_Dick.pdf (WFS)

Scott Kustes
08-24-2008, 01:57 PM
Gotcha Scott...misunderstood what you were saying. Good articles.

Gavin Harrison
08-25-2008, 11:31 AM
It's the truth! I just saw a TV news program here that sent a crew to Bolt's home in Jamaica and his sister pointed out the yams as the secret ingredient.

Must eat more yams.

Hey guys, I'm gonna go grab some nuggits, anybody want some?

Dave Van Skike
08-25-2008, 11:44 AM
Vern Gambetta weighs in...

http://functionalpathtraining.typepad.com/functional_path_training/2008/08/the-jamaican-se.html

Allen Yeh
08-26-2008, 04:32 AM
It is not about kinesio tape, altitude tents, underwater treadmills, it is simple, get kids moving doing athletic activities. Let’s get real PE back into the schools and bring the focus of our athletic competition back to the schools.

Nice.

Garrett Smith
08-28-2008, 08:22 AM
Guy Who Just Beat You To Bus Stop Usain Bolt (http://www.theonion.com/content/news_briefs/guy_who_just_beat_you_to)

John Vernon
08-28-2008, 05:26 PM
this one's pretty good as well:

http://www.theonion.com/content/infograph/usain_bolt_vs_tyson_gay

Garrett Smith
08-29-2008, 06:43 AM
That one was funny...

"I've got the sprints!"

John Vernon
08-29-2008, 10:21 AM
the one that got me was the "...speed gained through lighter weight is lost through death."

Scott Kustes
09-01-2008, 10:45 AM
My favorite was "remember to move by alternating between left and right feet as quickly as possible."

Ken Urakawa
09-13-2008, 08:13 AM
Some physicist just calculated that his time would have been 9.55 if he hadn't been showboating?

Insane.

Allen Yeh
09-13-2008, 10:58 AM
Someone mentioned to me that Usain Bolt gets a lot of money everytime he breaks a WR. So I guess it makes sense that he should only break the world record a little bit each time to maximize the money?

Steven Low
09-13-2008, 11:25 AM
Yeah, I heard that too.

But I really just think the guy was celebrating. He didn't even know he broke the WR until like halfway into victory lap... I mean 100m gold in the oly is pretty much a one time shot (maybe 2x if you're lucky).

Arien Malec
09-13-2008, 12:24 PM
Some physicist just calculated that his time would have been 9.55 if he hadn't been showboating?

http://www.sportsscientists.com/2008/09/usain-bolt-955s-yeah-right.html