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Grissim Connery
09-11-2008, 08:59 AM
I read some of that giant pesto thread and it was enticing. I made a peanut/ginger/lime/etc. tai sauce last night that made my day. What are your guys fave sauces (please include ingredients). I find that it's hard to find an intense sauce that doesn't contain at least one nightshade, nut, or dairy element. Any good options that have none of these or just 1? Preferably non-dairy.

Tony Ferous
09-20-2008, 11:19 PM
Mustard! Check for sodium content though. And wheat if your adverse...

Gittit Shwartz
09-21-2008, 01:18 AM
Tahini! Just posted this on another thread but here it is again:

Traditional tahini sauce (dressing for salad and grilled meat):
Mix 1 part tahini with 1 part lemon juice and cold water combined, and salt to taste. At first as you mix it it will oddly seem to start getting thicker. Keep mixing until it smooths out.
Even better: put the above ingredients in a blender with a clove of garlic, parsley, cilantro and mint.

Tahini is sesame seed paste. You can do the same with almond butter, but it won't be as intense.

Scott Kustes
09-22-2008, 11:59 AM
Gittit, so 1 part tahini and a half part each of lemon juice and water?

Gittit Shwartz
09-22-2008, 01:29 PM
Scott, the basic formula for sauce consistency is one part tahini to one part liquid, 1/4-1/3 of which should be lemon juice. So for example, 1 cup tahini, juice from 1 lemon, 3/4 cup water. You can also make it thicker for dipping/spreading.

Link to some more delicious ways to use tahini and the secret to Ido's superpowers:
http://www.cathletics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3054

Garrett Smith
09-22-2008, 04:06 PM
My favorite sauce of the moment:

1 heaping tablespoon almond butter
1 heaping tablespoon brown miso
1 heaping teaspoon crushed garlic
1 teaspoon crushed ginger
Splash(-es) of wheat-free tamari, to taste
Lime juice to thin sauce to desirable consistency

Always add anything with miso or tamari at the end of cooking, in an attempt to preserve the probiotics. It's also best to add garlic at the end as well. Remember that the sauce will "thin out" in the heat, so you can leave it a bit thicker before it gets stirred in. If you need more sauce, the easiest thing is to simply add more miso.

I get the almond butter, crushed garlic, and crushed ginger at TJ's, everything else is from Whole Foods.

I've been using this on grassfed ground beef and broccoli dishes lately. Man, it is really good.

If I had the time, I'd totally do a cooking blog.

Darryl Shaw
09-23-2008, 05:31 AM
Pistou is nice; it's the French version of pesto and is made by pounding together garlic and basil in olive oil to make a thick paste. Pesto is good too as long as you leave out the Parmesan.

http://www.epicureantable.com/articles/apistpest.htm

Xuan Mai Ho
09-23-2008, 06:12 AM
I make a similiar sauce to Garrett's except I use Tahini instead of the almond butter and leave out the tamari and lime juice.

To thin it, I usually use just a little bit of hot water. I use it to top steamed broccoli or steamed greens.

Frank Needham
09-23-2008, 09:30 AM
Real mayo and heavy whipping cream as a base, then add any flavoring or seasoning you like. Addition could be any of the following: horseradish, wasabi, mustard, tomatoe concentrate, dried onion soup, etc, etc. Dipped steak in mayo/cream last night it was way good.

Craig Brown
09-23-2008, 10:44 AM
1 part Ponzu Sauce
1 part rice vinegar
Sambal Olek (or shriracha or other chili sauce) to taste.

This is a killer dipping sauce, stir fry sauce, meat marinade...

Garrett Smith
09-23-2008, 11:15 AM
Nightshade-free curry powder:

1 part turmeric
1 part cumin
1 part ground coriander
Mix together, keep in airtight jar. Add to dishes at the end of cooking, best when mixed into dishes with a decent amount of fat/oil.

Also can add to the above small amounts of mustard powder, ginger powder, maybe even some ground horseradish. I'm also usually adding garlic to dishes that include this mixture.

Grissim Connery
09-23-2008, 04:32 PM
My favorite sauce of the moment:


Always add anything with miso or tamari at the end of cooking, in an attempt to preserve the probiotics. It's also best to add garlic at the end as well. Remember that the sauce will "thin out" in the heat, so you can leave it a bit thicker before it gets stirred in. If you need more sauce, the easiest thing is to simply add more miso.


I normally make sure to cook garlic right from the start because i've had a few bad experiences with eating way too much raw garlic. do you add the garlic at the end to keep it nipping at your throat, or is there a nutritional benefit?

Garrett Smith
09-23-2008, 05:15 PM
The most beneficial components of garlic are highly volatile and easily disappear through cooking.

From "Health Effects of Garlic (http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050701/103.html)":
Because alliinase also is deactivated by heat, cooked garlic is less powerful medicinally.

No nip, no health benefit. I tried eating raw garlic for a while. I won't do that anymore unless I'm trying to stave off a cold--even then, I swallow the cloves (or slices of clove) whole like pills...

Scott Kustes
09-24-2008, 08:38 AM
However, the blood pressure lowering effects of garlic are enhanced by cooking. Perhaps adding some early in cooking and the rest late in cooking is the way to go.

George Mounce
09-24-2008, 08:44 AM
I prefer the anti-vampire effects of garlic myself. :rolleyes:

In other thoughts, I use this over meat all the time.

1 package of dried shitake mushrooms
1 1/2 cups red or white wine
1/2 cup cream
2 tsp of capers
Salt and pepper to taste

Place mushrooms and wine into a small pot. Simmer mushrooms for 15-20 minutes in the wine. Add cream and capers and simmer 5 more minutes. Pour over meat and enjoy.

I'll post this in my log as well.

Darryl Shaw
09-25-2008, 05:56 AM
Nightshade-free curry powder:

1 part turmeric
1 part cumin
1 part ground coriander
Mix together, keep in airtight jar. Add to dishes at the end of cooking, best when mixed into dishes with a decent amount of fat/oil.

Also can add to the above small amounts of mustard powder, ginger powder, maybe even some ground horseradish. I'm also usually adding garlic to dishes that include this mixture.

Garrett, I'm sure you already know about the health benefits of turmeric but did you know that you can significantly increase it's bioavailability by combining it with black pepper?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9619120

Garrett Smith
09-25-2008, 06:12 AM
Darryl,
Good to know! Fresh ground peppercorns are always a finishing part of nearly any cooked dish I make, so I've got it covered!

sarena kopciel
09-27-2008, 09:41 PM
this (http://drbenkim.com/recipescilantrosauce.html) looks good too!!

I also made a tehina like sauce the other day but used hemp nut butter, ACV, olive oil, water, and miso. I enjoyed it!!