PDA

View Full Version : What to do if you can't afford grass-fed?


Emily Mattes
10-20-2008, 11:13 AM
Right now, I'm on a mostly-Paleo diet. Some cheese, dairy, but mostly meat and vegetables and healthy fats. Grocery bill has gone up, and I shell out the extra for the Omega-3 eggs.

However, going grass-fed has a lot of issues. I can't afford the deep freezer that would allow me to buy large quantities of meat for a bit cheaper. So getting it would mean at least two hours total of driving every couple of weeks (I live in Baltimore, Maryland and most of the farms are on the other side of the state). Not to mention, even if it WAS more accessible I still wouldn't be able to afford the higher cost.

But the Omega-6/Omega-3 imbalance of normal grain-fed meat worries me. Right now I take about 3g of omega-3 a day--is this enough to correct for it? Should I reduce my meat consumption? And if I reduce my meat consumption, how do I get enough protein to support my lifting?

Garrett Smith
10-20-2008, 11:19 AM
If you can't afford grass-fed, the next priorities are the lowest-fat cuts or organic, preferably both.

Brian Lau
10-20-2008, 11:27 AM
I would start by ditching the omega-3 eggs:

http://performancemenu.com/forum/showpost.php?p=27363&postcount=8

and the I wrote a piece about the relevance of the omega-3/omega-6 ratios in meat a little while ago that you might find helpful (short story, the ratio isn't practically relevant for red meat):

http://spartantraining.blogspot.com/2008/03/is-omega-6omega-3-ratio-of-beef.html

Mike ODonnell
10-20-2008, 01:26 PM
the leaner the meats, the less to worry about as far as omega 6 is concerned. I think farmed salmon is the worse offender way before beef is. I wouldn't sweat regular eggs. I read somewhere commercial lamb is always grass fed (?) and bison is almost all but omega 3s. Even if your diet is 4:1 Omega 6:Omega 3...you'll be fine.

Brian Lau
10-20-2008, 01:38 PM
I think farmed salmon is the worse offender way before beef is.

Farmed salmon is much better than either grass- or grain-fed beef in terms of the omega-6/omega-3 ratio, with a ratio of ~0.25 (wild-caught salmon has a ratio of ~0.1). Of course, as I point out in the post linked above, it isn't always sensible to focus solely on the omega-6/omega-3 ratio.

Mike ODonnell
10-20-2008, 01:54 PM
Farmed salmon is much better than either grass- or grain-fed beef in terms of the omega-6/omega-3 ratio, with a ratio of ~0.25 (wild-caught salmon has a ratio of ~0.1). Of course, as I point out in the post linked above, it isn't always sensible to focus solely on the omega-6/omega-3 ratio.

I see the ratio, still high on the omega 6 side even if it does have more omega 3s...although wonder how much of that Omega 3 from grains in the form of ALA translate into EPA/DHA. Either way....farmed salmon still not a good idea for health:

Seven of ten farmed salmon purchased at grocery stores in Washington DC, San Francisco, and Portland, Oregon were contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at levels that raise health concerns, according to independent laboratory tests commissioned by Environmental Working Group.

These first-ever tests of farmed salmon from U.S. grocery stores show that farmed salmon are likely the most PCB-contaminated protein source in the U.S. food supply. On average farmed salmon have 16 times the dioxin-like PCBs found in wild salmon, 4 times the levels in beef, and 3.4 times the dioxin-like PCBs found in other seafood. The levels found in these tests track previous studies of farmed salmon contamination by scientists from Canada, Ireland, and the U.K. In total, these studies support the conclusion that American consumers nationwide are exposed to elevated PCB levels by eating farmed salmon.
http://www.ewg.org/reports/farmedPCBs/

You are probably better off with the canned salmon as most of that is wild caught and canned quickly. (that and it's cheaper)

Philip Stablein
10-22-2008, 06:40 AM
Does the Waverly farmer's market continue through the cold months?

They have affordable (less than $5/lb) grassfed beef and lamb there, and they practically give the livers away. Everything is pre-frozen. I forget the farm's name, but its a family farm up in Churchville.