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View Full Version : Lyle Mcdonald's take on High Fructose Corn Syrup


Allen Yeh
01-08-2009, 03:51 AM
http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/research-review/straight-talk-about-high-fructose-corn-syrup-what-it-is-and-what-it-aint-research-review.html

Interesting write-up I thought and color me guilty as one of the people that might have overreacted a little and got caught up a bit in the anti-HFCS bit.

Mike ODonnell
01-08-2009, 08:35 AM
Yeah but he doesn't go into other chemical differences in sucrose and HFCS:

http://www.newscientist.com/channel/health/mg19526192.800-diabetes-fears-over-corn-syrup-in-soda.html
“Chi-Tang Ho at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and his colleagues found that adding the syrup to fizzy drinks makes them up to 10 times richer in harmful carbonyl compounds - elevated in people with diabetes and blamed for causing diabetic complications such as foot ulcers and eye and nerve damage - than fizzy drinks containing cane sugar.

The most harmful compound, called methylglyoxal, is known to damage cells directly. “The link between methylglyoxal and diabetic complications is well documented,” says Ho, whose team found carbonyl compounds in 11 popular brands of soft drink sweetened with the syrup.

High-fructose corn syrup is popular in the US, where import tariffs make cane sugar relatively expensive. It is made by treating corn starch with enzymes that transform some of the glucose into fructose. Ho says these free-floating monosaccharides can undergo the so-called Maillard reaction, which converts them into carbonyl compounds. By contrast, cane sugar consists almost entirely of pure sucrose, a disaccharide.”

and another article on the same research but more info:
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/532433/
“Researchers have found new evidence that soft drinks sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) may contribute to the development of diabetes, particularly in children. In a laboratory study of commonly consumed carbonated beverages, the scientists found that drinks containing the syrup had high levels of reactive compounds that have been shown by others to have the potential to trigger cell and tissue damage that could cause the disease, which is at epidemic levels.”

another good article on HFCS
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/archive/2004/02/18/FDGS24VKMH1.DTL

In the end I think it is most dangerous because it is consumed in greater amounts than table sugar….because it is hidden in so many processed things nowadays.