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Garrett Smith
01-13-2009, 01:49 PM
The Vitamin D Newsletter
March, 2007
Peak Athletic Performance and Vitamin D (http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/PDFs/2007-03-peak-athletic-performance-and-vitamin-d.pdf)
Could be the best bang-for-the-buck supplement out there according to the research he collected.

Blair Lowe
01-14-2009, 01:54 AM
Holy guacamole! :eek: Even better than milk!

Besides sun and fish, it doesn't seem like there is a lot of VitD in anything besides a bit in eggs and livers ( blech, though I hear the dessicated Argentinian beef liver is an awesome supplement for energy ).

George Mounce
01-14-2009, 03:10 AM
Holy guacamole! :eek: Even better than milk!

Unless it is raw, they add Vit D to milk. It would be fair to say it is probably the best source of Vit D for most.

Garrett Smith
01-14-2009, 07:59 AM
On milk and Vitamin D: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/
SUNSHINE AND YOUR HEALTH

If one regularly avoids sunlight exposure, research indicates a necessity to supplement with at least 5,000 units (IU) of vitamin D daily. To obtain this amount from milk one would need to consume 50 glasses.
I don't even think the GOMAD program would cover the 50 glasses--even though it might feel like it...

Mike ODonnell
01-14-2009, 09:01 AM
Unless it is raw, they add Vit D to milk. It would be fair to say it is probably the best source of Vit D for most.

I'd say Cod Liver Oil....2 for 1 with EPA/DHA and Vit D.

Garrett Smith
01-14-2009, 10:22 AM
MOD,
Carlson's has 2000iu A and 400iu D per teaspoon. To get the D mentioned above (for any of us with jobs that don't allow us to get 20 minutes of full-body midday sun exposure), that's ~12 teaspoons (4 Tablespoons). That would also be 24,000iu of A, more than even WAP recommends for adults--and close to what Chris Forbis said he got hypervitaminosis A from @ 30,000iu A / day). That would also be quite a bit of EPA/DHA, about 12 grams of total EPA/DHA in the 60g of fish oil. I had an ND friend who tried taking 15g of EPA daily and he definitely had some excessive problems with clotting due to that high a dose.

Green Pastures CLO has 5000iu A and 500iu D per serving. Obviously one gets into huge vitamin A doses if they were to try to get 5000iu D from this product alone, let alone 2000iu D. Depending on which product from Green Pastures one gets, there may or may not be much EPA/DHA present, as that isn't so much what their products try to emphasize.

The combo I'm tending toward is 2400mg total EPA/DHA, 5000iu A / 500iu D from CLO, and then filling in the D3 from a cholecalciferol product as necessary.

George Mounce
01-14-2009, 03:31 PM
My point is, the general population is getting it from milk.

Not to insult here, but this sounds very snake oil. All the sudden Vit D is the cure-all for everything? I will wave the BS flag.

So now we all must take fish oil and Vit D, when 10 years ago it was Vit C.

What the hell happened to real food? Our paleo ancestors weren't out looking for pills and capsules.

I have gotten sick one time in the last 9 or so years, and I can guaruntee it had nothing to do with vit D. Viruses will occur regardless.

I mean the addiction of the board to Vit D has bordered on the same thing Keys was talking about with saturated fats and cholesterol. Am I supposed to believe that the Vitamin D Council isn't biased?

Heck I can find a green tea study that shows drinking green tea lowers the risk of all forms of death!

Mike ODonnell
01-14-2009, 03:49 PM
Not to insult here, but this sounds very snake oil. All the sudden Vit D is the cure-all for everything? I will wave the BS flag.

Funny that the original snake oil was actually from Chinese sea snakes and was full of EPA (which helped people and their aches and pains).

Anyways....I'm just sticking with fish oil or eating fish (Vit D in them...yummy sardines). That and sunshine. I bet there are bigger issues like why people do not retain Vit D or properly utilize it....something tells me it's a series of complicated processes that all comes back to eating right, moderate exercise, no sugar, being outside and living a happy/less stressful life while getting plenty of sleep. That's my game plan. :)

Garrett Smith
01-14-2009, 03:57 PM
The avoidance of the sun and the detrimental effects are finally being realized, along with optimal blood levels of vitamin D (which should be those of folks spending time every day out in the midday sun with no sunscreen and plenty of skin exposed).

I'm one for believing it, as no life would exist without the sun, and most people are getting pathetic amounts of sunlight on bare skin.

Dave Van Skike
01-14-2009, 04:43 PM
Funny that the original snake oil was actually from Chinese sea snakes and was full of EPA (which helped people and their aches and pains).

Anyways....I'm just sticking with fish oil or eating fish (Vit D in them...yummy sardines). That and sunshine. I bet there are bigger issues like why people do not retain Vit D or properly utilize it....something tells me it's a series of complicated processes that all comes back to eating right, moderate exercise, no sugar, being outside and living a happy/less stressful life while getting plenty of sleep. That's my game plan. :)


In The Prize there is another genesis myth for term "snake oil" that suggests it started when settlers in Penn. noted that the Seneca tribe would skim oil off the surface of the river..thsi oil was runoff from petroleum deposits....folks bottled it and sold it as "Seneca Oli" a curative for all what ails ye.....

really puts the yum in petroleum.

Less vitamin D in my story I'll bet. I prefer your snake version.

Mike ODonnell
01-14-2009, 07:01 PM
This is an interesting page http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

....basically says Vit D deficiency is because of:
- lack of sun (UVB) exposure
- overuse of sunscreen (see above for UVB exposure)
- diets low in fat (malabsorption of Vit D)
- screwed up guts (malabsorption of Vit D)
- excess subcutaneous fat (obesity) that traps Vit D (lowering circulating levels)

that and I'm sure diets low in High Vit D foods too. Still comes full circle...eat right, stay fit, get outside and play and the body rewards itself. Man was not meant to live long and prosper in an office cubicle based world.

Tony Ferous
01-16-2009, 06:16 PM
I agree, vitamin D seems to be flavor of the month currently, perhaps no bad thing to relook at it though.
How much D does my Tuna canned in olive oil really contain though??

This is about the best link i could find, likely biased though, i'll chow down some more wild salmon.

http://newsletter.vitalchoice.com/e_article000760049.cfm?x=b11,0,w

Garrett Smith
01-16-2009, 08:31 PM
Research seems to show that certain levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower risks of many common chronic diseases of the day.

There's a simple blood test to find out one's Vitamin D level.

Vitamin D is free, or at worst dirt cheap. I'm looking at some D3 drops that are 1000iu per drop, 1500 drops per bottle, selling for somewhere in the $20-30s range. A 5000iu/day dose would have this bottle lasting 10 months. Not exactly a huge profit-maker but maybe a huge health booster.

It would seem unwise to ignore this potentially big boost to longevity practices.

I've seen impressive things happen with patients' health in a short time by supplementing "sun-phobes" in my practice. FWIW. I saw a woman's BP drop by 20 points after 2 days of some mildly aggressive D supplementation.

Most snake oils are expensive with little research. Vitamin D is cheap and has a ton of research. Doesn't seem to fit the mold.

Mike ODonnell
01-17-2009, 06:10 AM
perhaps the popularity of cod liver oil came along because of it's high Vit D along with the anti-inflammatory EPA/DHA

Cod liver oil was first used as a therapeutic agent in the 1770's, and by the mid-1800's it was well-recognized as a cure for the childhood bone disease, rickets, which is marked by an expansion of the bone's metaphyseal plate and a buildup of unmineralized bone matrix, and its adult equivalent, osteomalacia. Upon the discovery of vitamin A in 1913 as a component of cod liver oil and butterfat, researchers assumed vitamin A to be responsible for cod liver oil's ability to cure rickets. In 1921, however, a team of researchers established that there was a separate component of cod liver oil responsible for its ability to cure rickets, which came to be known as vitamin D

and looks like our mainstream paranoia of cholesterol isn't helping...shocker
Since cholesterol is a precursor to vitamin D, inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol will also inhibit the synthesis of vitamin D. Since sunlight is required to turn cholesterol into vitamin D, avoiding the sun will likewise undermine our ability to synthesize vitamin D. And since vitamin D-rich foods are also rich in cholesterol, low-cholesterol diets are inherently deficient in vitamin D.

also looks to be a balance of A & D that is essential for health
Vitamin D increases the need for vitamin A in chickens even in small amounts that are insufficient to guarantee freedom from rickets. One study showed that massive doses of vitamin A alone caused bone and growth problems in turkeys, while massive doses of vitamin D alone caused kidney problems -- yet when these doses were combined, the turkeys exhibited no signs of toxicity at all.

all from this page: http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/Vitamin-D.html

Garrett Smith
01-17-2009, 07:43 AM
There are theories out there (no research yet that I've come across) that high cholesterol levels could be indicative of a Vitamin D deficiency.

Low vitamin D = liver makes more cholesterol in the hopes of some sun exposure resulting in maximum vitamin D production.

Blog exploring vit. D and cholesterol, with some comments mentioning D supplementation and athletic performance: http://moblogs.wordpress.com/2007/08/25/high-cholesterol-low-vitamin-d-and-its-significance/

Study in Tehran: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17240585?ordinalpos=8&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
Mean values of serum lipids in different seasons were compared with Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) after adjustment for age, physical activity level, smoking, BMI and Waist-to-hip ratio. In men, there was a significant trend for change in the values of cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C in different seasons, with higher cholesterol and LDL-C values in winter than in summer (P < 0.05). In women, only the mean values of triglycerides were significantly different between different seasons with values lower in winter than in summer. There was a 26.2% relative increase in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (> or = 240 mg/dl) in winter than in summer in men. The corresponding increase in the prevalence of high LDL-C (> or = 160 mg/dl) was 26.7% and 24.9% in men and women, respectively (P < 0.05). The prevalence of high triglycerides (> or = _ 200mg/dl) in women significantly decreased (23.8%) in winter relative to summer (P < 0.001). This study showed that there is seasonal variability in serum lipid values and this variability is greater in men than women. The increase in the prevalence of high LDL in winter in both sexes must be considered in population screening and in the follow-up of hyperlipidemic patients.
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here--in Tehran (Iran), I am theorizing the the "lack" of difference in seasonal cholesterol levels in women as compared to the men could possibly be explained by the year-round wearing of head-to-toe clothing by women in the Muslim tradition?

Vitamin D levels have already been correlated with risks of diabetes and hypertension. Considering that hyperlipidemia is usually part of that little triad, it's not a bad thing to look into IMO.

Blair Lowe
01-22-2009, 01:48 PM
bottle of TJ VitD3 (cholecalciferol) was 3.99 or 2.99. Something ridiculously cheap. 180 caps would be 3 months at 2 caps a day (1k i.u.).

for 3 bucks a month, it's worth a shot to see what it can help with, especially as it's winter-ish in CA and I'm inside way too often.

Garrett Smith
01-22-2009, 04:19 PM
Blair,
If you're going to try it, you might want to go with at least 2000iu/day.

Article on Vitamin D toxicity: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitaminDToxicity.shtml

I'm currently on 5000iu/day, as I don't get outside during the midday hours. What can I say has happened? I feel like I'm waking much more refreshed from my sleep, I'm able to fall asleep more easily after waking in the early morning hours (I've always had trouble with that), and I've unintentionally dropped ~4 pounds of BW (I can tell I've gotten leaner in the mirror) and I'm still progressing as planned on my gymnastics and OL workouts even with the lowered BW--not a surprise on the gymnastics, but a surprise on the OL.

I'm looking forward to testing my cholesterol in several months to see if changes happen there as well.

Blair Lowe
01-22-2009, 11:42 PM
losing bodyfat? awesome.

i was doing 2,000 i.u. earlier this week and i started 4,000 i.u. last night. i generally do 1-2 caps while drinking my milk and downing my fish oil and calmagzinc. this is done generally when i wake up, get home from work and before bed. i was going to do a week at 2k i.u. but i might as well bump it to 4.

i'm no longer bike riding to work and about( because i got a car and it's probably a good thing ) and i haven't gone swimming in a few months because of the weather or schedule. i can probably deal with the cold river, but i need to get some of those water booties things so i don't slip and fall on my head or get poked by things on my soles.

i haven't been a complete hermit but i haven't been running on the track in awhile either on weekends.

Donald Lee
02-03-2009, 11:30 AM
I got this from OPT's newsletter (http://www.optimumtraining.ca/OPTMayJun_08.pdf):

It is commonly thought that the principal function of vitamin D is to promote calcium absorption in the gut and calcium transfer across cell membrains, thus contributing to strong bones and a calm, contented nervous system. Actually, vitamin D does not in itself promote healthy bone. Vitamin D controls the levels of calcium in the blood. If there is not enough calcium in the diet, then it will be drawn from the bone. High levels of vitamin D (from the diet or from sunlight) will actually demineralize bone if sufficient calcium is not present so you shouldn't just take a D supplement alone without supplementing with other important minerals. For those of you in the crowd worried about your body composition, vitamin D deficiency decreases biosynthesis and release of insulin...thus promoting glucose intolerance, and thus affecting your body composition test scores.

Garrett Smith
02-03-2009, 01:01 PM
Um, if there is not enough calcium in the diet, the body is always going to get it from the bone. That's a foregone conclusion.

Vitamin D increases uptake of calcium from the intestines.

If someone has a calcium-deficient diet to begin with, then compounds the issue with a vitamin D deficiency, they're really in a pickle because they won't be absorbing much of the calcium that they do take in!

A review from "Drugs and Aging" journal (I find this ironic):
Optimal vitamin D status for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18020534?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=5&log$=relatedreviews&logdbfrom=pubmed)
Vitamin D(3) (cholecalciferol) sufficiency is essential for maximising bone health. Vitamin D enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus. The major source of vitamin D for both children and adults is exposure of the skin to sunlight. Season, latitude, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, clothing and aging can dramatically influence the synthesis of vitamin D in the skin. Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D or are fortified with vitamin D. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D; calcifediol] is the best measure of vitamin D status. Vitamin D deficiency [as defined by a serum 25(OH)D level of <50 nmol/L (<20 ng/mL)] is pandemic. This deficiency is very prevalent in osteoporotic patients. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteomalacia, increasing the risk of fracture. Unlike osteoporosis, which is a painless disease, osteomalacia causes aching bone pain that is often misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia or chronic pain syndrome or is simply dismissed as depression. Vitamin D deficiency causes muscle weakness, increasing the risk of falls and fractures, and should be aggressively treated with pharmacological doses of vitamin D. Vitamin D sufficiency can be sustained by sensible sun exposure or ingesting at least 800-1000 IU of vitamin D(3) daily. Patients being treated for osteoporosis should be adequately supplemented with calcium and vitamin D to maximise the benefit of treatment.
Obviously, we need calcium and we need vitamin D. Duh, right? The comment about D without adequate calcium causing bone calcium to be leached seems unnecessary IMO. I haven't heard about the rash of studies showing people were becoming osteoporotic from taking too much vitamin D and not getting enough calcium--it seems to be the exact opposite.

Note that the above article is from a very conventional journal and is not discussing calcium, but only vitamin D, and using the word "pandemic" at that.

I could then add that too much calcium without enough magnesium causes all sorts of problems, and too much of this without enough of that causes these problems, ad nauseum. It just becomes counterproductive for the layperson. Could it be theorized that many of the "calcium deficient" folks became that way over a long period of being vitamin D deficient (and hence not absorbing it from their diets)?

The simple thing is that calcium can be obtained from diet and/or supplements rather easily, but the gatekeeper is vitamin D. Vitamin D levels can be tested and "optimized" according to what appears to be pretty reliable data. The fear-inducing statements about vitamin D just don't have to appear in every single article--all they have to say is *get D3 tested* and get your calcium.

Donald Lee
02-03-2009, 02:21 PM
I will take your word for it.

Stephen Sullivan
02-11-2009, 08:45 AM
Don't know if this has been already posted but seems like a pretty good, but pretty long presentation.

Presentation is by this guy:
http://osteoporosis.creighton.edu/bio_faculty/dr_heaney.htm (wfs)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emjCzaHtSrg&feature=channel (wfs)

Garrett Smith
03-09-2009, 02:57 PM
New study:
Vitamin D status and muscle function in post-menarchal adolescent girls. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19033372?ordinalpos=15&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum)
CONTEXT: There has been a resurgence of vitamin D deficiency among infants, toddlers, and adolescents in the United Kingdom. Myopathy is an important clinical symptom of vitamin D deficiency, yet it has not been widely studied. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate the relationship of baseline serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration and PTH with muscle power and force. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was community based in a secondary school. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 99 post-menarchal 12- to 14-yr-old females was included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Jumping mechanography to measure muscle power, velocity, jump height, and Esslinger Fitness Index from a two-legged counter movement jump and force from multiple one-legged hops was performed. Body height, weight, and serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, PTH, and calcium were measured. RESULTS: Median serum 25(OH)D concentration was 21.3 nmol/liter (range 2.5-88.5) and PTH 3.7 pmol/liter (range 0.47-26.2). After correction for weight using a quadratic function, there was a positive relationship between 25(OH)D and jump velocity (P = 0.002), jump height (P = 0.005), power (P = 0.003), Esslinger Fitness Index (P = 0.003), and force (P = 0.05). There was a negative effect of PTH upon jump velocity (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: From these data we conclude that vitamin D was significantly associated with muscle power and force in adolescent girls.
Girls with better vitamin D levels jump higher...how about that?

Blair Lowe
03-10-2009, 12:49 AM
Chocolate covered vitamin D capsules. Here you go girls!

Gittit Shwartz
03-10-2009, 04:03 AM
As far as that study goes... Girls who are naturally more athletic tend to spend more time outdoors in the sun so who can really single out causation?

Garrett Smith
03-10-2009, 07:09 AM
Gittit,
One could put it in context and correlate it with all the other studies that the Vitamin D Council accumulated on studies that showed improved performance with better levels of Vitamin D.

Girls who spend more time outside also are likely less depressed, which could be because they are getting more Vitamin D and they are also more active.

It does all fit together, hard to split apart, but muscles may simply function better with better levels of Vitamin D...

Neill Smith
08-17-2009, 12:03 PM
I just had blood work come back showing vitamin D deficiency. Does anybody have opinions about what kind of supplement to take? Is an over-the-counter D from the local pharmacy fine?

Thanks in advance.

Duke McCall
08-18-2009, 07:53 AM
There are two types of over-the-counter vitamin D. The one you want is vitamin D-3. (Sometimes "D-3" is not on the lable, and I cannot remember the scientific name, but if you google "D-3" you will find it). Other folks may have a view on brand, I do not.

Ari Kestler
08-18-2009, 07:56 AM
Trader Joes has a Vitamin D supplement, $5 for 180 drops, each drop is 1g.

Aaron Gainer
08-18-2009, 09:00 PM
Use Carlsons Cod Liver Oil if you want the benefits of vitamin d and fish oil in one easy supplement. I take two tsps which nets me 800IU of vitamin d3, and about 2gs of fish oil a day!!!

Chris Forbis
08-21-2009, 01:36 PM
Use Carlsons Cod Liver Oil if you want the benefits of vitamin d and fish oil in one easy supplement. I take two tsps which nets me 800IU of vitamin d3, and about 2gs of fish oil a day!!!

Watch out for Vitamin A toxicity if you go this route...

Garrett Smith
08-21-2009, 09:58 PM
Use Carlsons Cod Liver Oil if you want the benefits of vitamin d and fish oil in one easy supplement. I take two tsps which nets me 800IU of vitamin d3, and about 2gs of fish oil a day!!!
ALL of CLO is "fish oil", so that's actually ~10grams of fish oil a day. That could be too much for some people's coagulation pathways. It is ~2grams of EPA+DHA though (the "EFAs").

800iu of D3 is better than nothing, but it's not much (ie. the Vitamin D Council generally recommends 5000iu/day to maintain optimal levels for those over 180# bodyweight).

As Chris mentioned, some people's livers don't handle a lot of Vitamin A well, CLO-sourced or not.

I'm not getting down on CLO, but it does have several limitations.

FYI, I have D3 drops available, 1000iu per drop, 1500 drops/bottle, $25. Just sayin'.

Tony Ferous
08-31-2009, 04:13 AM
I just had my D3(25) results back...a 'disappointingly high' level of 32ng/ml, i was sure id be lower!! Crap all my issues must be due to some other problem ;-)

Ive been taking around 400iu in my various supplements, my only active sun exposure is perhaps once every 3 weeks id sunbath in shorts for an hour - i live on the equator(nearly).

I'm going to take 5k for a few weeks, then perhaps stick to 2k for a few more, except for bathing days, to try and kick it up to 50-70 then retest...

Garrett Smith
08-31-2009, 04:39 AM
Tony,
Work on your level, I've seen people around a level of 30 feel a lot better after supplementing. 400iu is better than nothing, but it's close to nothing.

In fact, I just had an older woman, longtime patient, with very chronic hip pain and a major limp (with a D level around 29) tell me all of her hip pain was gone (along with the limp) after a month of "loading" her with some D3 drops.

Dave Van Skike
08-31-2009, 04:59 PM
Tony,
Work on your level, I've seen people around a level of 30 feel a lot better after supplementing. 400iu is better than nothing, but it's close to nothing.

In fact, I just had an older woman, longtime patient, with very chronic hip pain and a major limp (with a D level around 29) tell me all of her hip pain was gone (along with the limp) after a month of "loading" her with some D3 drops.

I've started supplementing 5-6K per day. When does my awesome kick in?

Mike Romano
08-31-2009, 07:59 PM
I had a D3 level of 47 in my last blood work...too high?

Tony Ferous
09-01-2009, 06:18 AM
According to the vitamindcouncil, you should shoot for 50-70mg/ml.
Check out their newsletters, v interesting,

In fact he Dr Cannell recommends supplementing with 5k for 3 months THEN taking the test, i wanted to check my baseline level first though.

I emailed Dr Cannell with with a question, he emailed me back then next day, pretty good i thought.

And thanks Garrett...in fact i started on 5k before i had my results back, i must say ive felt a difference, just general wellbeing and awakeness. May be placebo affect but ive tried a shedload of other supplements without such effects....

Garrett Smith
09-01-2009, 07:07 AM
Feeling better is steady, over months.

Can't know if it's actually "taking" without blood tests, I try to do every six months.

There are other groups now recommending maintaining between 70-100 in the blood.

Mike Romano
09-01-2009, 02:55 PM
jeez that's a lot of vitamin d! at least its plentiful down here in carolina, and cheap during the winter months. My account is basically hemorrhaging cash already thanks to those damn norwegians hoarding all of their fish oil...

Tom Rawls
09-01-2009, 05:12 PM
A
FYI, I have D3 drops available, 1000iu per drop, 1500 drops/bottle, $25. Just sayin'.

Garrett,

Aren't you in Arizona? Why are you selling D instead of just sending people outside to spend a bit of time in the sun?

Dave Van Skike
11-16-2009, 08:18 PM
G.

I have been up on the vit. d tip for about two months. about 5,000iu a day on avg. damned if it doesn't work.

noted changes..

I generally sleep pretty badly but have been waking more refreshed on a consistent basis even with less than optimum sleep.

Immune system..have avoided three major flues that were going around the office and that my kids had. came down with soem sniffles but beat the cold in about 2 days. my kids bring home every damn thing so this is a big noticeable change.

Garrett Smith
11-17-2009, 06:05 AM
Nice, Dave! Good stuff, especially where you're at.

I'd suggest you get your kids on it too. 1000iu per 35# of bodyweight is a good level in general.

My baby girl has barely caught a sniffle this season, she gets a drop of 1000iu D3 in her bottle every day, sometimes along with some powdered probiotics.

Dave Van Skike
11-19-2009, 08:56 AM
Nice, Dave! Good stuff, especially where you're at.

I'd suggest you get your kids on it too. 1000iu per 35# of bodyweight is a good level in general.

My baby girl has barely caught a sniffle this season, she gets a drop of 1000iu D3 in her bottle every day, sometimes along with some powdered probiotics.

thanks!1000iu per 35#... makes sense.. kids are plugged in.

i'll hit you up offline re: the probiotics...think i'm over any skepticism i had on that front.

Eva Claire Synkowski
11-30-2009, 05:49 PM
dr. g!

im a little surprised at your comments regarding excessive EPA/DHA doses. i believe ive seen robb suggest 0.5g EPA+DHA per 10# bodyweight. do you think that is too aggressive?

Garrett Smith
11-30-2009, 06:50 PM
Maybe for treatment of a condition, that dosing would be fine in certain cases. Or for a person that has been chronically diet-deficient in EPA+DHA for a long time (maybe their whole life?). My fish oil pills at the office have 800 EPA+DHA per capsule, for me to take 11 of those a day would seem a bit much to do every day for the rest of my life.

For normal folks, that might be a bit much...depends on the person. Coagulation problems, depending on the person, could easily start in susceptible people.

I'd personally spend my money on a smaller amount of fish oil and the rest on other things that work along different pathways.

Deficiency in Vitamin K could be a large part of how super-aggressive fish oil protocols came to be...Vit. K used to always go along with our animal fats, now it is hardly present at all.

EDIT: Eva, I checked Robb's blog after the post I made that I thought you were referring to, you might want to look at that, it seems Robb and I were relatively agreeing...http://robbwolf.com/?p=910&cpage=2

Tony Ferous
02-13-2010, 01:37 AM
Thought id update all on my vit D testing experience..

So i got tested in august 09 at 32ng/ml, after probably years of just ~400iu D a day and occasional inadvetant sun on vacations.

Then started on 6k a day(5k of that oil based gel caps), and getting 1h of sun on at weekend days where possible. and not showering afterwards hahaha. ;-)
I retest in Jan and scored 55nl/ml 25-OH total.

Not bad.
But im gonna kick it up to 11k 5 days a week based on the 1000iu per 25lb daily guideline and see how i feel.
I tested with ZRT btw.

Wayne Riddle
02-13-2010, 04:05 AM
Thanks for the update Tony.

Allen Yeh
03-08-2010, 03:28 AM
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6261IX20100307

A blurb on Reuters talking about the link between T-cells and Vitamin D.

Tony Ferous
07-11-2010, 12:09 AM
Sounds good info in Dr Eades blog review of 'The Vitamin D Solution' book....

Why not just take the supplements and forget about the sun?

Vitamin D made in the skin lasts at least twice as long in the blood as vitamin D ingested from the diet. When you are exposed to sunlight, you make not only vitamin D but also at least five and up to ten additional photoproducts that you would never get from dietary sources or from a supplement.

I can almost here the supplement manufacturers creating 'full spectrum vit D' caps!

John Alston
07-12-2010, 05:58 AM
I can almost here the supplement manufacturers creating 'full spectrum vit D' caps!

I hope they succeed for real. Some of us live in places where the sun can be hard to find for significant stretches at a time.

Tony Ferous
07-13-2010, 04:50 AM
Yep i hear ya John - was in a most sarcastic mood!