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View Full Version : Interesting Jonathan Chaimberg interview (GSP's coach)


Andrew Wilson
02-15-2009, 06:47 PM
Here (http://cdn1.libsyn.com/strengthcoachpodcast/Episode_22-_Strength_Coach_Podcast.mp3?nvb=20090216020659&nva=20090217021659&t=01f5c587e56dc9729f275) w/f/s. Starts halfway in the podcast
Talks about CrossFit
Explosiveness
Training GSP mixed with sport training
GPP/Strength phases
Sports specific training
Mistakes by strength coaches (mentions CrossFit style & hard circuits, no periodization, long distance training...)

He's good, but then again he's sport specific.

Gant Grimes
02-17-2009, 07:28 AM
That's a good listen. Mike Boyle had good points, too.

Yes, he is sport specific, but his sport has a high power and GPP component. There is a lesson there.

Andrew Wilson
02-17-2009, 08:12 AM
His addition of Complex Training is really, really interesting as well. I'm going to add that to my Oly; it seems like all his athletes, Marquardt, Kang etc almost have that same explosiveness as GSP...

R. Alan Hester
02-17-2009, 11:18 AM
That was a good interview, with good points.

Some guys in my BJJ gym have been going hard in the Crossfit class and are starting to burnout training BJJ 4-5 times a week (2 hour sessions) plus 5 sessions of chipper-style, old-school Crossfit, in preparation for the Pan-Ams and NAGA at the end of March. Instead of managing fatigue by smart programming, they work harder to push through the pain.

(The above is not an indictment of Crossfit. Individuals ought to educate themselves regarding programing and peaking for an event.)

Donald Lee
02-17-2009, 06:36 PM
Here's a training video of GSP, Denis Kang, and Loiseau:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPDVEWWP4KU

Anton Emery
02-17-2009, 07:24 PM
Thanks for posting that, good stuff.

Derek Weaver
02-17-2009, 11:07 PM
That was a good interview, with good points.

Some guys in my BJJ gym have been going hard in the Crossfit class and are starting to burnout training BJJ 4-5 times a week (2 hour sessions) plus 5 sessions of chipper-style, old-school Crossfit, in preparation for the Pan-Ams and NAGA at the end of March. Instead of managing fatigue by smart programming, they work harder to push through the pain.

(The above is not an indictment of Crossfit. Individuals ought to educate themselves regarding programing and peaking for an event.)

I think even the CF die hards would admit this is probably too much.

I have only listened to a little bit of the podcast, but I'm kind of familiar with Chaimberg. Dude is legit. There are several videos of his guys doing complex training working around youtube. Worth a search, except I'm lazy and it's late.

Anthony Bainbridge
02-18-2009, 04:35 AM
I haven't listened to the podcast, but regarding periodization, it's certainly nice to know when you will compete, how you will compete, against who, and for how long ... not to mention only competing in one sport ... this is really what separates specific from general.

Just because someone needs strength and conditioning doesn't mean it's GPP.

Jacob Rowell
02-18-2009, 07:03 AM
Good points overall.

I would say that for the most part, cf affiliates who have been around for awhile have long since gotten over the whole "you know you got a good workout when you puke" thing that gsp's coach describes. I know my guys sometimes feel cheated if they're still in one piece after a workout, but, so it goes.

I liked his thoughts on focusing his training on explosiveness/speed rather than the more obvious muscle endurance/metcon aspect, makes a great deal of sense. If you are diligently working what on what your competitors are weak at, you're bound to get somewhere with it.

Worked well for gsp.

Derek Weaver
02-18-2009, 07:38 PM
Jacob,
Good point. I think it's no coincidence that the best CF Athletes are all extremely powerful and come from power biased sports. I think I remember reading that Speal wrestled, Josh Everett's an Oly Lifter, football etc. Pat Barber, I think was a volleyball player if I remember right what they said at my Cert.

All sports that involved a high power aspect to be effective whether it be a 300+ lb. C&J, a double leg takedown or spiking a volleyball.

Robb Wolf
03-03-2009, 01:58 PM
Glen Cordoza (one of NorCal's athletes) just won his MMA fight in Louisiana. We followed much the same template we outlined in the Fight Prep guide I wrote for the PM with the main changes being olympic lifts for the base strength work and the removal of the SDLHP from Fight Gone Bad, now substituting a 95# hang power clean (calling this one "Fight Gone Better".

FGB was used once per week as a non-sport conditioning session and as a diagnostic. Glen did very little "Crossfit" type training during the last 8 weeks of training as fight pre (time indexed for a 3 round, 5 min/round fight) took up the bulk of his time. Interestingly he managed to score over 400 on FGB on this schedule.

He has another fight in a month. One week of lite recovery work, then ramping back up for the next go-around. His off season is shifted to maintenance work for fighting, heavy duty crossfit. It works great for his mental state and keeps him constantly challenged.

I really like the work GSP's guy is doing...great stuff there. New coaches really need to keep an eye on recovery and what the weaknesses are in their athletes. "More Work" is not a smart way to tackle that issue!

Anton Emery
03-12-2009, 01:57 PM
Robb,

I'd be interested in hearing how you programmed Glenn's O-lifting work, whenever you have a minute. I would like to incorporate O-lifting into my own programming, but only really have 3 days to train outside of BJJ. Alot of the O-lifting templates i find, even for other sport athletes, involve more days of lifting. You mentioned using a similar scheme from Fight Prep, so something like 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of a lower body movement, snatch or clean, and an overhead movement?


Anton

Joe Hart
03-12-2009, 03:34 PM
Anton,

Right at the moment I am using Coach Rut's grapplers ME from PM44. It seems to be working well. I have been making some good progress on the OLY lifts. I have not been able to get as much BJJ in as I would like so it could be too much (family obligations).
There are a few college wrestling teams that have posted some of thier S&C. Weslyan and S. Carolina (wolfpack) come to mind. I had a chance to talk to the U of MN S&C coach for the wrestling team. It was interesting. He liked CLNs, dips and pull ups in particular. I will have to look at my notes for the rest. I asked him about strength standards and he didn't think much of it other than he wants to see the wrestlers making progress from a baseline. I didn't think to ask if that was testing in the beginning of the preseason or what.

I will be interested to see any other ideas that show up.