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View Full Version : Hurt my bum a week ago, and it still hurts.


Patrick Donnelly
02-16-2009, 09:14 AM
Short Version: I slipped. Now my bum hurts, and has been for a week, mostly whenever I contract the glutes, which is during pretty much any barbell lift. This sucks. Help?


More Details:
So, last Tuesday, I slipped and hit my bum pretty hard on the edge of some stairs. Almost immediately, it hurt just to walk, or go from standing to sitting. This continued on through Tuesday. On Wednesday, it hurt a little bit for squats and deadlifts, though not enough to hold me back. Thursday and Friday were rest days, so I didn't feel anything. Saturday, any contracting of the glutes hurt, as did leaning back while sitting. I've been icing occasionally since then (my icepack only stays cold for about 20 minutes and takes forever to refreeze). This morning, after icing, I went to do my lifting. Turkish get-ups were fine, though sitting down on the floor to get the weight in position was a little bit of a pain. Tried a windmill, but it was excruciating, and dropped the weight immediately. Gave a shot at my first set of snatches, but that also hurt very badly.

There was never any bruise on the skin. It feels like I simply may have bruised my coccyx. I wouldn't say it was broken, because then I would be in much greater pain consistently.

It's very hard to get any bloodflow to the area, since any muscle activity that would increase the bloodflow also causes pain. Generally, I'm against taking pain medications, since it simply makes you feel better (note the new Tylenol slogan) without actually making you better, so you can injure yourself even more without feeling it. I liken it to slamming your hand with a hammer while overdosing on morphine. You're still hurting yourself, you just don't feel it... Yet.

What can I do to help the condition improve? This is a serious pain in the ass, pun fully intended.

George Mounce
02-16-2009, 11:20 AM
I'd say your best bet would be to rest the injured area and let it heal. I know that isn't the answer you are looking for but, what would you do if you tripped and rolled your ankle? You'd rest it, ice like you are doing as well. Take a hot bath that can help too.

Patrick Donnelly
02-16-2009, 02:31 PM
Yeah, I skipped today's workout after the first snatch to let it heal, but I hope this doesn't take very long to recover. At least I have rings/p-bars to work on inthe meanwhile.

Steven Low
02-16-2009, 05:50 PM
Sounds like you probably slipped an SI joint. Is it below your iliac crest (iliac crest = L4-L5 ish) and off to one side? If so, probably slipped SI joint. See a physical therapist..

Patrick Donnelly
02-16-2009, 06:30 PM
Sounds like you probably slipped an SI joint. Is it below your iliac crest (iliac crest = L4-L5 ish) and off to one side? If so, probably slipped SI joint. See a physical therapist..

If you follow the butt crack up to the top where it begins to fade off, there's a bony structure. That's where it hurts (especially when going from seated to lying supine, as in getting to the start position of a TGU). The pain is smack dab in the middle, and not off to either side.

George Mounce
02-17-2009, 03:42 PM
Ah, man I know exactly what you are talking about.

When I was a kid I feel backwards playing hockey and landed my ass in the same location on the front of another kids skate. It hurt for at least 2 months (I was 6 at the time, so thats like 25 years ago!) and I hated having to go take a crap, as it was horribly painful to move.

Rest, rest, rest!

Garrett Smith
02-17-2009, 04:50 PM
Let's hope you don't end up needing to get your coccyx adjusted....

Patrick Donnelly
02-17-2009, 07:06 PM
Anyone have any opinions on the use of anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen in situations like this, or is my general attitude against them just fine?

Rest, rest, rest!

Yeah, that seems to be the only solution. Hopefully, my injury is less severe though, and won't require as great of a recovery time.

Let's hope you don't end up needing to get your coccyx adjusted....

Dude, that's even less cool than Steven nearly recommending that I go see a physical therapist. If it were that bad, then I would hardly be able to walk right now. Please stop suggesting **** like that which can do nothing but cause me to worry, or next time you come up with a sniffle my response will be "Let's hope it's not pneumonia contracted because of an immune system weakened by AIDS."

Steven Low
02-17-2009, 07:56 PM
Well, massage is generally good for everything. But I don't know if you want to massage that, haha.

Anti-inflams would be good if there's swelling. If not well.. don't bother. If you're taking fish oil anyway it should be ok.

Garrett Smith
02-18-2009, 08:53 AM
Dude, that's even less cool than Steven nearly recommending that I go see a physical therapist. If it were that bad, then I would hardly be able to walk right now. Please stop suggesting **** like that which can do nothing but cause me to worry, or next time you come up with a sniffle my response will be "Let's hope it's not pneumonia contracted because of an immune system weakened by AIDS."
:)
Relax...it's not anything to worry about. Neither is physical therapy! I was joking. :D

The thing to watch for is the pain not improving over time. Then go to more intensive means of correcting the issue.

If it is just a bruised coccyx, no worries. If you really need an adjustment, that's the only thing that would help. The negative anticipation of it and any perceived slights on your masculinity from having to go through it would be the worst parts--and those would both be by your own choice.

You'll end up getting a prostate exam at some point in your life (if you're smart), the coccyx adjustment is no worse (it actually takes less time).

Every joke has some truth in it, but my intention not to worry you. Hope it feels better soon.

Mike ODonnell
02-18-2009, 08:57 AM
Your body has the best internal healing system every designed....if you let it do it's job. Take time off, read a book....life is a long journey, you don't need to max squat every step of the way.....setbacks happen (and will), so get used to time off here and there.

Ben Fury
02-18-2009, 09:20 AM
If you follow the butt crack up to the top where it begins to fade off, there's a bony structure. That's where it hurts (especially when going from seated to lying supine, as in getting to the start position of a TGU). The pain is smack dab in the middle, and not off to either side.

Very not fun! If it is just bruised, stay off it, stand as much as possible and ice it and it will heal.

If the SI bones are dislocated, they need to be manually readjusted. That requires a therapist going in rectally and pushing the the bones back into place. Very undignified, but at least then it will heal right.

Steven Low
02-18-2009, 08:26 PM
Very not fun! If it is just bruised, stay off it, stand as much as possible and ice it and it will heal.

If the SI bones are dislocated, they need to be manually readjusted. That requires a therapist going in rectally and pushing the the bones back into place. Very undignified, but at least then it will heal right.
Nah, SI joint can be manually corrected without rectal invasion... :)

Ben Fury
02-20-2009, 01:04 AM
Nah, SI joint can be manually corrected without rectal invasion... :)

Really, how? I'm sure the sports specialists would love to throw away their rubber gloves and never have to do THAT adjustment ever again!:rolleyes:

How do you pull the coccyx back out into correct alignment without reaching inside to get ahold of it? It's embarrassing and uncomfortable to get set; but better that than suffer tailbone pain for decades as people commonly do after these injuries.

Garrett Smith
02-20-2009, 05:45 AM
Ben, I've come across the internal coccyx adjustment, I haven't ever come across an internal S/I joint adjustment.

I'm thinking you and Steven are talking about the same things.

Duke McCall
02-20-2009, 10:25 AM
I did something similar many years ago (fell out of a tree onto my tailbone--on a rock :eek: ). I could not sit down for weeks, but was too embarrased to let my mom (who is a nurse) take me to the doctor. The pain eventually went away, but my coccyx is definitely misaligned today (almost 30 years later). All of which is a long way of saying, I feel your pain, but the pain will eventually go away. My only lasting problem is an inability to do situps on a hard surface (No big deal, I just use a GHD instead). So, take it easy and give your body time to heal.

Steven Low
02-20-2009, 03:29 PM
This is one of the ways you can "shotgun" the pelvis if an SI joint has slipped to hopefully reset it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkltzrvatlU&feature=channel_page

I was taught a similar method along those lines.

Craig Brown
02-20-2009, 03:45 PM
I do this for my girl (as in the video) - set my elbow against one knee and palm against the other, and it shifts (audibly) back in place when she squeezes her knees toghether.

Patrick Donnelly
02-21-2009, 08:01 PM
You can find legit medical advice on YouTube? That boggles my mind.

Fortunately, the injury is improving. I've refrained from squatting or pulling since Monday, and now I can lean back further without pain (still get it, just further back). Maybe it'll be another week or so until I'm pain free. Hopefully. Workouts without squats are lame.

Craig, what sort of injury did she have, and do you need to do that on a regular basis? The readjustment sounds sort of painful.


Garrett, my apologies for the over-dramatic reply. You caught me at a bad time with things that I really did not wish to hear.

Garrett Smith
02-21-2009, 09:32 PM
Patrick,
No worries. As you get older and are still training, you'll get more and more familiar and comfortable with the folks that help fix the inevitable sports injuries.

Ben Fury
02-21-2009, 10:00 PM
Ben, I've come across the internal coccyx adjustment, I haven't ever come across an internal S/I joint adjustment.

I'm thinking you and Steven are talking about the same things.

Yeah, I mistyped S/I when what I really meant was coccyx. That helped make everything clear as mud.

It definitely sounded from the description of the pain that the coccyx might have been dislocated. The correction is outside the scope of my practice... and I intend to keep it that way!