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Chris H Laing
03-30-2009, 05:02 PM
So at the moment I am pretty much unable to do a high bar back squat. Not sure why, but I would like to start training with it as soon as possible.

I had thought that working on front squats would help me get used to the position, but I just find myself tipping forward on the front squats, which makes it hard to use an significant weight.

Are their better ways to working up to a high bar back squat? Should I keep chugging away at the front squats, or maybe work on converting low bar back squats to high bar?

My plan is to get my hb back squat nice and strong, and then get into oly lifting, but I cant get a strong HB backsquat if I cant do one...haha.

Any advice?

Brian DeGennaro
03-30-2009, 05:05 PM
Do you have any video of your squats?

George Mounce
03-30-2009, 06:37 PM
Do you have lifting shoes?

Chris H Laing
03-31-2009, 03:18 AM
I can get videos, and I do have lifting shoes. The rogue dowins.

Brian Lawyer
03-31-2009, 07:22 AM
See if any of this helps:
Everett says on his DVD that everything has to conform to an upright torso. By that I mean sit down in a squat position, lift your chest make your torso upright, and then position Knees, hips, toes, etc. all around maintaining that upright torso position. From there, you would have your squat stance. Probably your toes should be flared quite a bit and knees wide. Feet shoulder width. You can try sitting down against a wall to set your torso straight and sit down on your ankles.

Also, why are you waiting to train Olympic lifting? If you do an overhead squat with the bar you should start working on snatches and C&J's.

Chris H Laing
03-31-2009, 09:46 AM
Also, why are you waiting to train Olympic lifting? If you do an overhead squat with the bar you should start working on snatches and C&J's.

I'm waiting because I cant do an overhead squat with good form. Its like a weird LB back squat cept I'm holding the bar up instead of resting it on my back.

I wanna wait because I feel like if I have a strong HB back squat, it will help me with the upright position, so I can start training the FS and OHS more effectively.

Brian DeGennaro
03-31-2009, 10:32 AM
Getting that OHS better will guarantee a good FS and BS.

From my assumption you have long legs and/or inflexible ankles which is making you lean over so much with your toes pointed slightly out. Guess what? Turn your feet out even more, there's nothing wrong with it. It suits your body type.

That's my .02 and my assumption. Longer femurs are going to make you shoot your hips back and head forward the more straight ahead your feet are.

Arden Cogar Jr.
03-31-2009, 10:53 AM
I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I'm in a similar quandry.

I can back squat (in high bar narrow foot fashion) a LOT more than I can front squat (like 250+ kilos compared to 165 kilos). Granted I didn't start front squatting on a regular basis until last Fall (actually, I couldn't hold the bar in the rack until last Summer).

To remedy this discrepancy, I've stopped back squatting all together. Now, all I do is front squats and OHS. I've also widened my stance on both my front squat and OHS to more accurately reflect my recieving stance in the clean and snatch.

Am I going about this properly?

All the best,
Arden

Brian DeGennaro
03-31-2009, 11:00 AM
Yes you are, Arden. Front squats will naturally raise your back squat or keep it where it is at since it's so damn high. I'm pretty sure my back squat's gotten up there as a result of front squatting for the past 2 months. I'm using weights for FS I normally use to rep out on BS so I'm positive. I've also found that it's very important to push the knees out while FS'ing and OHS'ing and keep pushing even as you lock the weight out.

I wish I had a 250kg+ BS...

Arden Cogar Jr.
03-31-2009, 11:14 AM
Yes you are, Arden. Front squats will naturally raise your back squat or keep it where it is at since it's so damn high. I'm pretty sure my back squat's gotten up there as a result of front squatting for the past 2 months. I'm using weights for FS I normally use to rep out on BS so I'm positive. I've also found that it's very important to push the knees out while FS'ing and OHS'ing and keep pushing even as you lock the weight out.

I wish I had a 250kg+ BS...

Thanks Brian,
It's all relative. You look great on a beach and I'm simply "big and scary looking" to my 11 year old daughter's friends.

I'll stay the course and keep on plugging.

All the best,
Arden

Chris H Laing
03-31-2009, 05:18 PM
Getting that OHS better will guarantee a good FS and BS.

From my assumption you have long legs and/or inflexible ankles which is making you lean over so much with your toes pointed slightly out. Guess what? Turn your feet out even more, there's nothing wrong with it. It suits your body type.

That's my .02 and my assumption. Longer femurs are going to make you shoot your hips back and head forward the more straight ahead your feet are.

Thats an excellent assumption. I have extremely long legs and extremely inflexible ankles. Should I widen my stance more, or just turn out my ankles more?

Also, are you saying I should work on my OHS, before switching to BS and FS? I was under the impression that things like OHS and FS (the more form oriented ones) would be easier if I had built up a substantial amount of strength in the BS (the more basic one).

Thanks for all the help so far.

Brian DeGennaro
03-31-2009, 05:36 PM
Nah, overhead squats are the hardest ones, so why not get that one down pat before moving onto the easier ones? I know people who can squat some relatively heavy weights that get owned by a bar and light weight for overhead squats (this includes kids who FS between 120 and 220kg for reps). Overhead squats teach you body tension and make you flexible so it is a must to get them right. Get the OHS and the FS and BS will follow rather easily

Brian's suggestion is what I always have prescribed for people to find their squat stance. Just get into the bottom however you want, fidget around, and make sure you can get an upright torso with knees and hips tracking over your feet before calling it your stance.