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View Full Version : Andy Bolton beats his record deadlift...


Gavin Harrison
04-08-2009, 02:24 PM
A few days ago Andy Bolton beat his old record deadlift (1003 lbs) by lifting 1008 lbs.

Here's the clip on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5groVHlMkRE

Sam Nutt
04-08-2009, 02:51 PM
A few days ago Andy Bolton beat his old record deadlift (1003 lbs) by lifting 1008 lbs.

Here's the clip on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5groVHlMkRE

:eek: My goal is half that. I will continue to lament my girly legs.

Dave Van Skike
04-08-2009, 03:41 PM
soft lockout.
hitched,
gear whore.

Just kidding. That went up at an ungodly rate of speed.

Allen Yeh
04-08-2009, 04:19 PM
Insanity.

George Mounce
04-08-2009, 04:30 PM
That dude is all muscle, gut, and super human being.

Patrick Donnelly
04-08-2009, 05:05 PM
soft lockout.
hitched,
gear whore.

Just kidding. That went up at an ungodly rate of speed.

You had me really ****ing confused until line four.

Kevin Perry
04-08-2009, 05:21 PM
That is the definition of a monster

David Boyle
04-08-2009, 06:32 PM
Yea he's a freaking beast.

You know I wonder how his o-lifts are?

I imagine he can clean & jerk a house....

Enrique Billington
04-08-2009, 10:18 PM
Bet he can't clean a house as good as my mom can though. B)

Gavin Harrison
04-08-2009, 11:50 PM
He kinda looks like fred flintstone ;)

Btw, all the gymnastics/skinny people/strength-to-weight ratio people are just going to say it's only a 2.72xBW lift, since he weighs about 370 lbs :P

Awesome lifter, king of deads, king of WPO SHW division... I think, Donnie Thompson competes in the IPA these days? At least that's where he set his 2905 lbs total a while ago... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qROD-wQ4SKg

Enrique Billington
04-09-2009, 12:05 AM
This post probably constituted as trolling.

Darryl Shaw
04-09-2009, 05:29 AM
Btw, all the gymnastics/skinny people/strength-to-weight ratio people are just going to say it's only a 2.72xBW lift, since he weighs about 370 lbs :P

Hey, I'm not skinny I'm just small boned! ........and yeah strength-to-weight ratio and all that....... <mutters under breath about fatties getting all the glory and the unfairness of it all......>

Arden Cogar Jr.
04-09-2009, 08:35 AM
Absolutely unreal.

I've read that Andy performs power cleans as a regular part of his training. I'm curious as to what kind of poundages he power cleans. That too, would have to be insane.

I've also read that he never pulls any heavier than 800 from the floor during his training. He does heavier rack pulls with near his ME lifts. Makes a lot of sense really.

All the best,
Arden

Dave Van Skike
04-09-2009, 09:59 AM
Absolutely unreal.

I've read that Andy performs power cleans as a regular part of his training. I'm curious as to what kind of poundages he power cleans. That too, would have to be insane.

I've also read that he never pulls any heavier than 800 from the floor during his training. He does heavier rack pulls with near his ME lifts. Makes a lot of sense really.

All the best,
Arden

Ha! that's funny., i was just reading a spippet from Jim Wendler this morning that the greatest thing he learned from L. Simmons was that you can use submaximal weights to get stronger, such as using a trainiing max of 650 and pulling 710 in a meet.

Arden Cogar Jr.
04-10-2009, 07:02 AM
Ha! that's funny., i was just reading a spippet from Jim Wendler this morning that the greatest thing he learned from L. Simmons was that you can use submaximal weights to get stronger, such as using a trainiing max of 650 and pulling 710 in a meet.

It makes a lot of sense when you really think about it.

For example, most oly lifters rarely go about 85 to 90% in their training. And when they get to that 90% level, they're performing singles. But for the most part, the "practice" is done with weights that bring about stress but no so much stress that it breaks down the body.

The partials also make sense to me. Andy is extremely fast off the floor. The bar obviously slows when he gets to his knees - thus, he has a lot of leg and hip strength. It's the bringing the hips to the bar part of the movement that he needs to really concentrate on.

However, when you're pulling weights at that level......it's just not worldly. Ya know?

All the best,
Arden

George Mounce
04-10-2009, 07:07 AM
But for the most part, the "practice" is done with weights that bring about stress but no so much stress that it breaks down the body.

You just hit on the key to training smarter while training hard Arden. I think just about everyone can learn from this. I discovered this recently with my deadlift (which is oh, less than 1/2 of what Andy puts up :p). You don't have to go for a PR every day!

Brian Stone
04-10-2009, 07:38 AM
It makes a lot of sense when you really think about it.

For example, most oly lifters rarely go about 85 to 90% in their training. And when they get to that 90% level, they're performing singles. But for the most part, the "practice" is done with weights that bring about stress but no so much stress that it breaks down the body.

The partials also make sense to me. Andy is extremely fast off the floor. The bar obviously slows when he gets to his knees - thus, he has a lot of leg and hip strength. It's the bringing the hips to the bar part of the movement that he needs to really concentrate on.

However, when you're pulling weights at that level......it's just not worldly. Ya know?

All the best,
Arden

Interesting concept. Almost a different variation on GTG, but with submaximal weight done more often rather than the same principle with reps.

Chris H Laing
04-10-2009, 08:25 AM
You just hit on the key to training smarter while training hard Arden. I think just about everyone can learn from this. I discovered this recently with my deadlift (which is oh, less than 1/2 of what Andy puts up :p). You don't have to go for a PR every day!

I think after you reach a point this becomes true, but for those of us who are not deadlifting 500 lbs, and can still recover fast enough to set PR's every workout, we should be.

Gant Grimes
04-10-2009, 11:08 AM
You just hit on the key to training smarter while training hard Arden. I think just about everyone can learn from this. I discovered this recently with my deadlift (which is oh, less than 1/2 of what Andy puts up :p). You don't have to go for a PR every day!

My lifts, my recovery, and my disposition improved the day I started reading Louie a couple years ago. The man has put as much free knowledge on the net as anyone in the game. DE days are a godsend.

Gant Grimes
04-10-2009, 11:17 AM
Here is a good raw vid from Chris Jenkins (a great PLer in his own right).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gYSwsrAJN0

There's a lot to be said for a great corner man. Despite the circus atmosphere of a WR DL, Bulldog gets Andy to laser focus on the lift. Awesome.

Donald Lee
04-10-2009, 01:08 PM
I think some of you are slightly misunderstanding the difference between a training maximum and a competition maximum. I will repost what I posted here (http://performancemenu.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3909&page=6) from Supertraining:

It is vital to recognise a training maximum TF max or training 1RM (single repetition maximum), which is always less than the competition maximum CFmax in experienced athletes, because optimal motivation invariably occurs under competitive conditions (Fig 1.1). Zatsiorsky states that the training maximum is the heaviest load which one can lift without substantial emotional excitement, as indicated by a very significant rise in heart rate before the lift (Medvedev, 1986). It is noteworthy that, in the untrained person, involuntary or hypnotic conditions can increase strength output by up to 35%, but by less than 10% in the trained athlete. The mean difference between TFmax and CFmax is approximately 12.5 +/-2.5% in experienced weightlifters, with a large difference being exihbited by lifters in heavier weight classes (Zatsiorsky, 1995).

....Intensity is usually defined as a certain percentage of one's maximum and it is most practical to choose this on the basis of the competitive maximum, which remains approximately constant for a fairly prolonged period. The training maximum can vary daily, so, while it may be of value in prescribing training for less qualified athletes, it is of limited value for the elite competitor.

It is relevant to note that competitions involve very few attempts to reach a maximum, yet they are far more exhausting than strenuous workouts with many repetitions, since they involve extremely high levels of psychological and nervous stress. The high levels of nervous and emotional stress incurred by attempting a competitive maximum require many days or even weeks to reach full recovery, even though physical recuperation would appear to be complete, so that this type of loading is not recommended as a regular form of training.

In other words, any attempt to exceed limit weights requires an increase in nervous excitation and interference with the athlete's ability to adapt, if this type of training is used frequently. In attempting to understand the intensity of loading prescribed by the apparently extreme Bulgarian coaches who are reputed to stipulate frequent or daily use of maximum loads in training, one has to appreciate that training with training maxima (which do not maximally stress the nervous system) is very different from training with competitive maxima (which place great stress on nervous processes).

If Andy Bolton pulls about 800 lbs from the floor in training, that's about 80% of his competitive maximum.

The mean difference between TFmax and CFmax is approximately 12.5 +/-2.5% in experienced weightlifters, with a large difference being exhibited by lifters in heavier weight classes

For sure, 800 lbs is greater than 90% of his training maximum.

Enrique Billington
04-11-2009, 01:00 AM
Anyway I see you guys are talking about powerlifters, do you guys know that Shane Hamman could back squat what Andy deadlifted? His best clean was 232kg.. Something a 94kg lifter could put up. And Shane was a professional Olympic lifter. The shame thing goes for Mark Henry, +950ibs deadlift, 717ibs front squat and a best clean of 220kg. Once again, professional weight lifter.

Stuart Buck
04-14-2009, 07:31 AM
Did anyone see the first video of Andy Bolton here: http://beyondstrong.typepad.com/my_weblog/2009/04/andy-bolton-4575kg.html

It shows his warmups. Obviously, to a guy who can pull 1000+ pounds, 500-something pounds is nothing. Still, it's cool to see how the weight just flies up like it's an empty bar.

Dave Van Skike
04-14-2009, 07:36 AM
Anyway I see you guys are talking about powerlifters, do you guys know that Shane Hamman could back squat what Andy deadlifted? His best clean was 232kg.. Something a 94kg lifter could put up. And Shane was a professional Olympic lifter. The shame thing goes for Mark Henry, +950ibs deadlift, 717ibs front squat and a best clean of 220kg. Once again, professional weight lifter.

many people have squatted over 1000 in gear. there are indications of people full squatting over 1000 raw, none to PL legal depth and none in competition that i'm aware of. 1008 is the new world record for deadlift. i'm sure any lifters who are willing to pay the membership fee can show up and set records regardless of pedigree. mark henry was also a powerlifter and at one time professional wrestler..

running your jib over the merit of one sport and dismissing phenomenal accomplishments doesn't make anyone smarter....especially when it is a proven scientific fact that motocross is the best sport.

Gavin Harrison
04-14-2009, 09:34 PM
many people have squatted over 1000 in gear. there are indications of people full squatting over 1000 raw, none to PL legal depth and none in competition that i'm aware of. 1008 is the new world record for deadlift. i'm sure any lifters who are willing to pay the membership fee can show up and set records regardless of pedigree. mark henry was also a powerlifter and at one time professional wrestler..

running your jib over the merit of one sport and dismissing phenomenal accomplishments doesn't make anyone smarter....especially when it is a proven scientific fact that motocross is the best sport.

I wanted to say something snarky, but decided against it. Yay.

John Seiler
04-16-2009, 01:56 PM
all the gymnastics/skinny people/strength-to-weight ratio people are just going to say it's only a 2.72xBW lift, since he weighs about 370 lbs :P

Say..., I weigh half as much as him and my deadlift PR is half as much as his. That means that pound for pound I can hang with the best deadlifter in the world. YES!

Thanks Gavin!

Arden Cogar Jr.
04-16-2009, 02:35 PM
Say..., I weigh half as much as him and my deadlift PR is half as much as his. That means that pound for pound I can hang with the best deadlifter in the world. YES!

Thanks Gavin!

Unfortuantely, it just doesn't work that way.

On those figures, I'm at about 3.1xbw and I bow in admiration of Andy Bolton. That dude can pull stuff that no other human has ever been able to pull - no matter the size, etc.

However, like me, I doubt he can do a muscle up. :rolleyes:

And John, the fact that you pull 504 at 185 is freakin worthy of some serious respect. Good damn work my friend.

All the best,
Arden

John Seiler
04-16-2009, 07:42 PM
Unfortuantely, it just doesn't work that way.

On those figures, I'm at about 3.1xbw and I bow in admiration of Andy Bolton. That dude can pull stuff that no other human has ever been able to pull - no matter the size, etc.

However, like me, I doubt he can do a muscle up. :rolleyes:

And John, the fact that you pull 504 at 185 is freakin worthy of some serious respect. Good damn work my friend.

All the best,
Arden

Party Pooper! :D Just playing. Yeah, it's unfortunate that it doesn't work that way. But it sure sounds good. :)

Thanks for the props; very cool coming from a gent of your abilities.

Gavin Harrison
04-16-2009, 09:37 PM
Say..., I weigh half as much as him and my deadlift PR is half as much as his. That means that pound for pound I can hang with the best deadlifter in the world. YES!

Thanks Gavin!

Best pound for pound deadlift is somewhere around 5xBW, IIRC. ;)

Either one is admirable, but half a ton is just my bending..

Enrique Billington
04-17-2009, 01:27 AM
Dave I know Mark Henry was a powerlifter (so was Shane Hamman), they were both powerlifters before they were Olympic weightlifters, that was my point, a big deadlift has no correlation to cleaning. Deadlifting does not train one for the most important part of the lifts, the squat under the bar, both of these two lifters were known for their inefficient squats under the bar, especially Mark Henry, due to their practice of overextension (triple extension), a habit they undoubtedly formed doing deadlifts, power cleans, and high pulls.

Arden Cogar Jr.
04-17-2009, 07:42 AM
Dave I know Mark Henry was a powerlifter (so was Shane Hamman), they were both powerlifters before they were Olympic weightlifters, that was my point, a big deadlift has no correlation to cleaning. Deadlifting does not train one for the most important part of the lifts, the squat under the bar, both of these two lifters were known for their inefficient squats under the bar, especially Mark Henry, due to their practice of overextension (triple extension), a habit they undoubtedly formed doing deadlifts, power cleans, and high pulls.


Enrique,
I am a perfect example of what you have described. I have the ability to deadlift in excess of 360 kilos. Yet, the most I have ever cleaned is 141 kilos. It's very humbling and I love it - as I've found since I've taken up olympic lifting (and stopped frequent overly heavy pulls and squats) all the aches and pains have gone away.

But you are absolutely right - for me, the pulling power for deadlifts does NOT equate to a persons cleaning potential. I have performed clean pulls with over 200kgs, but there is absoltely no way i could ever get myself under that bar and stand up with it. No way. And, to be frank, I never intend to.

I can someday see myself snatching my bodyweight (117) and c&J 150 to 160. At least those are my long term goals. But for now, I'm moving weights that are in the 80 to 100 range and 110 to 130 range. It's complete mastery of technique and that's the part that I'm truly enjoying. And, at this stage, I'm very far from the mastery of anything - but perhaps humility? :o

All the best,
Arden

John Alston
04-17-2009, 04:46 PM
I think some of you are slightly misunderstanding the difference between a training maximum and a competition maximum. I will repost what I posted Zatsiorsky states that the training maximum is the heaviest load which one can lift without substantial emotional excitement, .

I will second this from personal experience. I have seen this written in multiple places that intelligently discuss Bulgarian training, I've seen Gelnn Pendlay describe this online, Dan John's written about this, and I've felt the difference myself.

Gant Grimes
04-18-2009, 01:20 PM
Nice to see you back around.

Chris Forbis
04-18-2009, 03:15 PM
Dave I know Mark Henry was a powerlifter (so was Shane Hamman), they were both powerlifters before they were Olympic weightlifters, that was my point, a big deadlift has no correlation to cleaning. Deadlifting does not train one for the most important part of the lifts, the squat under the bar, both of these two lifters were known for their inefficient squats under the bar, especially Mark Henry, due to their practice of overextension (triple extension), a habit they undoubtedly formed doing deadlifts, power cleans, and high pulls.

And Michael Jordan wasn't very good at baseball...