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View Full Version : Protein Quality vs Protein Quantity


Matthieu Hertilus
04-17-2009, 11:12 AM
I know it's always better to go for quality, natural food sources in any type of diet for any type of goal; however, I wonder when one crosses the fine line between quality and quantity. I'll take myself as an example:

5'6, 77kg, approximately 12% bf. Training under the bulgarian cycle of weightlifting w/ calisthetics and occasional deadlifting 5x/ week. Looking to at least maintain performance but primarily looking to drop body fat.

Now that I've set the scenario: some may recommend anywhere from 100-200g of protein considering my only carb source comes from vegetables, nuts, and the occasional piece of fruit.

So if my protein intake ends up being at the lower end of the scale (100g or below all from fish, meat, and BCAA supplementation) will that hinder my goals or do I really need more protein even if that comes from sources that are not "optimum" (i.e. low fat/low sodium cottage cheese, milk and eggs from grass fed animals, low fat deli meat, etc.)?

Derek Weaver
04-17-2009, 07:55 PM
More protein. All the items you listed are "optimum". Animal proteins, followed by powders... plant proteins suck.

A good rule of thumb is at least 1 gram/lb of BW.

Darryl Shaw
04-18-2009, 05:50 AM
As long as you're eating a varied diet and your calorie intake is adequate you'll be getting all the protein you need so that's what you need to be concerned with not your protein intake.

Matthieu Hertilus
04-18-2009, 08:45 AM
More protein. All the items you listed are "optimum". Animal proteins, followed by powders... plant proteins suck.

A good rule of thumb is at least 1 gram/lb of BW.
Don't you lose the thermic effect that protein creates by using protein powders?

Derek Weaver
04-18-2009, 04:01 PM
No.

Derek Weaver
04-18-2009, 04:05 PM
As long as you're eating a varied diet and your calorie intake is adequate you'll be getting all the protein you need so that's what you need to be concerned with not your protein intake.

I disagree. If fat loss is the goal while sparing protein loss as much as possible then protein intake is the most important nutrient to check.

As Lyle says, set calories, set protein (1-1.5 g/lb should be sufficient for anyone), get EFA's, fill in the rest with whatever you run on and respond to best.

Matthieu Hertilus
04-18-2009, 04:48 PM
More protein. All the items you listed are "optimum". Animal proteins, followed by powders... plant proteins suck.

A good rule of thumb is at least 1 gram/lb of BW.

Thanks for the input. I've been a little scared off by protein powders because i thought only foods created a thermic effect and protein powders weren't natural, but if there aren't any other objections, i'll start integrating them slowly to get in that 1 gram/lb. Usually I've been on about .5-.6g/lb at best, but hopefully this change will help

Brian DeGennaro
04-18-2009, 04:53 PM
Re; powders, they should not make up the bulk of your protein intake. If they do, you might as well be getting your protein from nuts. Also, do not try to add too much protein to milk or shakes. "One heaping scoop" to 8oz of milk is absurd. I find a 2 scoops can fill a half gallon just right so its not chunky or anything.

Derek Weaver
04-18-2009, 06:37 PM
Brian's right in that powders should be a supplement, not the main source of protein in a diet. Tuna, chicken with the skin on (you can always get rid of the skin and bones later) etc. are cheap sources of good quality protein.

It's not exactly the same as getting protein from nuts. Amino acid and what not are different, but the philosophy still holds true.

Brian DeGennaro
04-18-2009, 06:44 PM
Yeah, that was for the sake of having an example. It's just saying, why would you do that? Both are not the best sources of protein whatsoever.

I think the hierarchy for protein quality is something like: meat>eggs>dairy>nuts/vegetables>supplements.

Derek Weaver
04-18-2009, 10:07 PM
Yeah, that was for the sake of having an example. It's just saying, why would you do that? Both are not the best sources of protein whatsoever.

I think the hierarchy for protein quality is something like: meat>eggs>dairy>nuts/vegetables>supplements.

Sure, I think that people will always do better on whole food proteins rather than supplements. Especially in the long run.

Nuts and vegetables though go far below protein supplement. Assuming whey and casein proteins are being ingested (well, and egg proteins too) they're far more useful than vegetables and nuts in terms of protein, not overall nutrition (micronutrients, fiber, monounsaturated fats). I