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noxide sys
08-04-2009, 12:30 AM
Hello
What is better to get more strenght used in combat sports: planche progression or lever progerssion? I ask, because I don't have chin up bar at home yet and haven't much time during the week also.

jake oleander
08-04-2009, 10:37 AM
Hello
What is better to get more strenght used in combat sports: planche progression or lever progerssion? I ask, because I don't have chin up bar at home yet and haven't much time during the week also.

theyre meant to be done together as compliments, but if you dont have a bar...why not just do planche?

Derek Weaver
08-04-2009, 06:04 PM
I don't know that either one really does much for combat. There is some element of static strength needed in combat depending on the style/sport, but not a ton.

Combat sports primarily rely on a mix of strength endurance and power. Not sure how either one is going to really develop those conditioning attributes.

Grissim Connery
08-05-2009, 01:21 AM
both motions teach you how to keep a firm body. they don't make a direct correlation to fighting. they will make you stronger though

noxide sys
08-05-2009, 01:59 AM
I need to build up my strenght because my muscles are weak and also it will be used in grappling techniques. Is power of the punch related to the velocity of short circuit of muscles in the final phase of punch? I think that much stronger muscles give more short circuit of muscles, so strenghten body is more effective to develop speed and power of the punch. Is that right?

Steven Low
08-05-2009, 11:15 AM
The best way to train punching power is to actually practice punching.

But stronger muscles do help, yes.

Derek Weaver
08-05-2009, 06:35 PM
Strength is a tricky matter. You can get a wirey guy who's got wicked power, or a real blocky, and strong guy who doesn't have much on his punches.

It's as much about foot placement/rotation, hip rotation, strength and snap through the shoulders and arms (as well as chest and upper back) as well as range as it is about being strong.

But like Steven said, being stronger is never a hinderance.

Peter Dell'Orto
08-06-2009, 06:19 AM
I'm no expert on gymnastics, but if you don't have a chinup bar, it seems like the front lever work will be more difficult to engineer. That itself would tell me to do the planche. This assumes you're talking about working at home.

Mike ODonnell
08-06-2009, 03:08 PM
I'm not a boxer....but speed of a punch should be more of a CNS adaptation....the more you practice quick movements, the better your body gets at doing it.

Derek Weaver
08-06-2009, 08:12 PM
Just like anything in sport, it's a specific response. Proper form and coordination will enable to the body/cns to respond accordingly.

Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.

sollo rick
08-14-2009, 01:31 AM
Steven said it all, but let put a few more words with that
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnFh_N5zATo&feature=fvw
Relaxation, form and timing are the most important things for power. Look at Silva’s last fight. For training in addition to punching, Olympic lifting could not hurt nor could general conditioning. For Olympic lifting and boxing you need a real coach, the most important thing past oneself. Good Luck