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View Full Version : Critique this Sprint/Interval and strength program


Kevin Perry
09-05-2009, 11:05 AM
Can you guys critique this program? I'm trying to build something that would allow me to train for a decent 1 or 2 mile run but still let me strength train. I was thinking of doing something like this for 6 - 8 weeks after I'm done with the SS phase in a couple weeks. So far I've come up with this. Normally I would just do CF with some extra running but I don't want to get back into CF until I know exactly when my ship date is.

Another thing, I was trying to find resources on how sprinters train because I've read before that they use a lot of strength and o-lifting for their explosiveness and I was trying to model this after that in a way.

4 days a week

Mon:
Sprints 70m x 5?
Back Squat 3 x 5
Bench Press 3 x 5
Bent Over Rows 3 x 5


Wed
Snatch
Clean/Jerk
Front Squats

Fri
400m int. x 4?
Front Squat 3 x 5
Deadlift 3 x 5

Sat
400m intervals x 4?
Power Clean 3 x 5
Overhead Press 3 x 5

Brian Baggetta
09-05-2009, 11:14 AM
This has been recommended before: http://www.brianmac.co.uk/sprints/ (wfs) and I have enjoyed the routine. That said, these are *sprint* programs, not programs designed for someone looking to improve @ 1-2 miles. IMO, sprints will always help, but do bear in mind that these programs are (depending on which you select) geared for people who are training for the 100, 200, and/or 400.

What are your goals for lifting? If you're interested in oly, any reason you're not doing CA programming?



Also, in my experience, this will work much better if you split the track and weightroom work, say morning and evening, provided you can fit that into your schedule.

Kevin Perry
09-05-2009, 11:37 AM
Well my priority is preparing for the APFT, pushups and situps have never been an issue but running is.

I have been on SS for a little bit now and im closing in on some strength goals for the lifts and my bodyweight weight goal. I would like to keep working towards improving some of the lifts for a little longer. I'm not doing the Pmenu wod because O-lifting is no longer a priority, I like doing the O-lifts but I have wednesdays for that with a coach.

I'm not sure if I can split the workouts now that the semester has started, that would be difficult to implement. Thanks for the link.

Brian Baggetta
09-05-2009, 11:49 AM
Got it on the oly; feel your pain with the schedule

I guess my question was whether you are looking to gain strength or maintain what you've built on SS?

I think it will be very hard, for example, to make gains in DL and bench training them only once a week, particularly if your schedule forces you to train them right after sprint intervals.

(FWIW, I think you should do the intervals first, as you have it listed in your program, since your stated issue is running)

Kevin Perry
09-05-2009, 12:39 PM
Yea I'd like to maintain strength and slowly improve, I know it would be hard for some of the lifts working them only once a week.

Well let me ask this: for those currently in the Army specifically Infantry or related branches, how much strength do you feel would be a good base for which to begin conditioning?

Donald Lee
09-05-2009, 12:52 PM
How fast do you think you can run right now? How fast do you want to or need to run? How much time do you have until you take a APFT?

Kevin Perry
09-05-2009, 12:57 PM
I can run about a 7:30 min mile, I'd like to improve that as best as I can. As for the APFT I don't have to take it for several months, so I have time. My plan was to get strong first then to start working on the run and then work on overall GPP.

Donald Lee
09-05-2009, 01:15 PM
This is what I've seen in the military. People start out skinny or at least without much lifting of weights. As they progress or get older, they get bigger and stronger.

I think a good idea would be to strength train 2-3 days/week and run 3 days a week LSD. Do that maybe for a month or so. Maybe once a week you can do a fartlek run with bits of higher intensity. Then, you can start doing more intervals and such after that first month, but intervals of 70 m aren't really helpful for the military IMO. Plus, starting off running with intense intervals is a recipe for injury or overdoing it.

In my experience, it's worth it to work into running again. I spent way too much time strength training thinking it would transfer into endurance, and then I'd find myself having to go all-out endurance in the last 2-3 months before OCS. Maximal strength really has little transfer to endurance in the short run.

So I guess my advice is to do what you need to do to get in shape for the military first. Then, you can do whatever you want later on. Wanting to sprint fast and be really strong is not what you need to be in the military initially. The military wants you to have endurance, so you should train for that first.

Scott Kustes
09-05-2009, 01:18 PM
Not going to make you faster over 1-2 miles by focusing solely on 400m and below runs. And 400m intervals on back to back days is a bad idea if you're actually running those intervals hard.

Kevin Perry
09-05-2009, 01:32 PM
Ok, I was initially thinking sprints to improve speed for the runs but endurance is not my knowledgeable area.

So 2 - 3 days of resistance training plus a few days of running just vary the distance? 1,2,3 miles and longer as needed? Thats not tough to figure out.

Scott Kustes
09-05-2009, 01:54 PM
You might want to search for track programs for 1 and 2 mile runners and 5k training programs. Those will be more tailored to your needs and will include the requisite interval work.

Steven Low
09-05-2009, 02:02 PM
Ok, I was initially thinking sprints to improve speed for the runs but endurance is not my knowledgeable area.

So 2 - 3 days of resistance training plus a few days of running just vary the distance? 1,2,3 miles and longer as needed? Thats not tough to figure out.
Depends on how much time you have.

I'm of the opinion that if you have enough time to develop your speed that you can transfer it into endurance. But if your program is sooner rather than later, then you'll probably need to hit up the interval work with longer runs sooner rather than later as well.

Kevin Perry
09-05-2009, 02:48 PM
Depends on how much time you have.

I'm of the opinion that if you have enough time to develop your speed that you can transfer it into endurance. But if your program is sooner rather than later, then you'll probably need to hit up the interval work with longer runs sooner rather than later as well.

Well as far as im aware I should have enough time to develop the necessary endurance, I just figured I would start working into it sooner than later instead of posting "I have 6 weeks till so and so" like the trend is on some other unnamed forum.

Scott Kustes
09-06-2009, 07:08 AM
Depends on how much time you have.

I'm of the opinion that if you have enough time to develop your speed that you can transfer it into endurance. But if your program is sooner rather than later, then you'll probably need to hit up the interval work with longer runs sooner rather than later as well.
This is true. But he doesn't need to work heavily on 100m speed. Focusing on anaerobic capacity and lactate turnover by focusing on 400s also isn't going to be a big help when running 8x the distance. It will improve the mile and beyond, but not like actually training the 2 mile run will. I still suggest looking up training programs for 2-mile runners...they do "short to long" work too (some of them), but it's more focused on the elements that a 2-mile runner needs, not a 200-800m runner.

Kevin Perry
09-06-2009, 12:20 PM
Well for now I'll just go with 3 days of lifting plus a few days of running 1 - 3 miles just to start working into the grove again. I'm guessing after a month or two when the conditioning starts to improve I can then worry about intervals and improving the actual run time with a specific 2 mile or 5k program.

Steven Low
09-06-2009, 01:37 PM
This is true. But he doesn't need to work heavily on 100m speed. Focusing on anaerobic capacity and lactate turnover by focusing on 400s also isn't going to be a big help when running 8x the distance. It will improve the mile and beyond, but not like actually training the 2 mile run will. I still suggest looking up training programs for 2-mile runners...they do "short to long" work too (some of them), but it's more focused on the elements that a 2-mile runner needs, not a 200-800m runner.
Yeah, I agree. 400m work can help, but from what I've they generally like the intervals to be about as long as the race distance divided by anywhere from 1.5 to 6.

Kevin: I'd start with 800m interval work if it were me (for 2 mile program). Distance/4.

Matt Cricchio
09-06-2009, 02:44 PM
Kevin, this might help. It worked for me:

http://performancemenu.com/forum/showthread.php?t=866&page=8

Ok, I’ve finally got my arse in gear and here are the further progressions. As before you will need to apply some creativity to how you adapt my suggestions and remember these are suggestions. You should make these runs personal to you, your abilities and your local geography.

For reference I’ve reproduced the first 20 sessions.


20 Sessions

1. 15 minute run. This can be a jog. Get out. Don't stop. 15 minutes that's it. Go home. No more jogging after this.

2. 1 min on, 1 min off, 30 minutes. You will run hard for a minute. Recover by walking for a minute. This will give you 15 minutes of work, 15 minutes of recovery. The pace should be around your 400 metre mark but really this about perceived exertion. I use a lot of these intervals. The aim is to push as hard as you can but never so hard that you get crushed and can't finish the whole session. If you don't feel great after a recovery drop your pace down a little for the next interval. BUT DON'T STOP!

3. 3 x 7 minutes, 3 minute recoveries. Obviously this will be slower than Run 2. This is a tough one so early on.

4. Benchmark A. For me this run is about 2 miles long. The first 5 minutes are a steep climb, then followed by about 4 minutes fairly flat ground, 2 minutes very fast descent and then two to three minutes of flat running to finish. For the first time aim to do this in about 17-18 minutes ie pace yourself heavily. If you don't have any hills and are just running 2 miles flat then make that 15-16 minutes. Record your time.

5. 2 mins on. 1 min off, 30 minutes. 20 minutes work, 10 minutes recovery.

6. 20 minutes - flat ground. Just a simple 20 minute run at a comfortable pace. At 20 minutes stop and walk home.

7. Benchmark A. Go for it this time and beat your score.

8. Benchmark B. Mine is a 5 minute climb, 15 minutes flat, 4-5 minute fast descent. I reckon it's about 3.9 miles. Time and record.

9. 5 mins on, 1 off, 30 mins. 25 minutes work. 5 minutes walk recovery. This hurts. Intervals 3 and 4 will be challenging.

10. 20 minutes at an even pace over mixed ground. A bit more fizz than on run 6 and mix the ground up a little so you're not just running flat. 20 minutes done, go home.

11. Benchmark C. This should be about 3 miles. 5 minutes on the flat, 5 minute gradual climb. 7 minutes flat. 4 minute descent. Make the last 15-16 minutes fast. Time and record.

12. 12.5 mins on, 3 mins off x 2. 25 minutes work, 6 minutes recovery. Don't overcook it.

13. Benchmark A. Beat your score.

14. 3 x 10 mins, 2 mins recovery. 30 minutes work. 6 minutes recovery. You should be feeling pretty strong on these and reluctant to stop at 10 minutes each time.

15. 25 minutes, mixed ground/mixed pace. Get a hill in there, push your speed right up, drop back down to a plod. No walking. 25 minutes done, go home.

16. 3 mins on, 1 min off, 40 mins. 30 minutes work, 10 minutes recovery.

17. Benchmark B. Time and record. Beat your score.

18. Benchmark A. Beat your score.

19. 30 minutes. Wherever your feet take you.

20. 15 mins on, 3 mins off x 2. Push out on these intervals.


Sessions 21 - 35

This takes thing on a stage, a few longer runs, a chance to beat some benchmark times and some different intervals

21. Benchmark C. Record and beat your time.

22. 20 minutes, mixed ground/pace. Vary the terrain (at least one hill) and push your pace from slow jog to hard running as you feel fit.

23. 1 minute on, 30 seconds off, 30 minutes. Go hard but the 30 second walk recoveries will go in a flash.This is 20 intervals/minutes of work.

24. Benchmark B. Record and beat your time.

25. Hill training. Warm up for 5-10 minutes with easy running. I use a climb that is about 150m in length and is challenging. The hill forms part of a street grid, ie a square of roughly equal sides. Run the climb as fast as you can. Jog very slowly across the top of the square. Run back down at a steady stride. Walk the bottom of the square. Repeat for 9 reps. Cool down with 15 minutes of steady running.

26. Planned Fartlek. I have mentioned before that I think Fartlek takes a lot of discipline. Plan an interval session in your head but don’t be afraid to make adjustments if your feel fried. Mine is roughly like this: 5 minutes climb at a steady pace, then back down the hill by the fastest route, then back up by the most direct (but steepest) route. Recover for a minute or two with slow jogging and then run back down the original 5 minute climb at full tilt. Then run steady for a further 5-6 minutes. Next comes about 1000m of lamp post sprints (trees or other features will do). Sprint to the first one and then jog to the second and so on. I recover for about a minute (the time it takes me to cross a railway footbridge near my house) and then put in a further sprint for 100m. 5 further minutes of steady running follow before a final hard push of 2 minutes to home. Ok, the above takes some digesting but the idea is to plan something that keeps you working at a varied intensity (and remember hills are speedwork in a different guise) for 25-35 minutes. Be creative. With many of the runs I do, home is the end point of the run so I plan routes that bring around to that point and aim to push hard to the finish. With sessions that just say Run 30 minutes I make a rough estimate of where that will take me and then aim to get to as close to home as possible before time runs out.

27. Take Bench Mark C but add a 10 minute loop to the route roughly in the middle of the run. This doesn’t need to be challenging terrain.

28. 5 mins on, 1 minute off, 42 minutes.

29. Bench Mark B but vary the first 10 minutes of the run (ie change your route)

30. Benchmark A. Record and beat your time.

31. 30 minutes. Run wherever your feet take you.

32. 2 minutes on, 1 minute off, 30 minutes. Hard running.

33. Benchmark C. Record and beat your score.

34. 20 minutes on, 5 minutes off, x 2.

35. Using the template of R27, now add 10 minutes to run near the end of the route, preferably involving a nasty climb. So, your five minutes from your usual finish, run in a different direction for five minutes out and then five minute back and then continue.


Sessions 36 - 50

Some of these are nasty and I would apply some caution. Go out and run a trail and see how long you can go for, you don’t to bust a gut. I would have thought that an hour of gentle running would be perfectly possible by this stage.

36. 1 minute on, 1 minute off, 1 hour. Get plenty of hills in here and run hard. This is only 30 minutes of work.

37. 1 minute on, 1 minute off, 2 minutes on, 1 minute off up to seven minutes. Then sevens minutes on, 1 minute off, back down to 1 minute of work. 56 minutes of running with 14 minutes of rest. Get some hills, push your efforts. This can be hellish.

38. Queen of the Hill. There are supposedly seven hills near my house (it looks like one to me) and I originally pinched the idea off a local running club for a method of getting relatively testing climbing work in on my mountain bike. Along a stretch of about 1.5 miles there are 10 parallel streets running up these hills and the start of nearly all my runs takes in one of these. I live about half way along the bottom with 5 mins of running taking me in either direction. Each hill takes 5 minutes to run up, less to run down. I run the five minutes to the start and then run up the first street, down the second and so on until I reach the end and then run the 5 minutes to home. This approximately 5 miles and I don’t like it much. Play around with this. You could just find a steep climb, warm up and then run up and down it 5 times although that could prove rather dull.

39. 35 minute trail run. Make sure you include some climbs. Choose a circular route.

40. 35 minute trail run. Reverse the direction of R39.

41. 45 minute road/trail run. Wear a light rucksack for this one just to make things interesting. Mix the route up a bit, grass, trails, man made surfaces etc.

42. King of the Hill. This hell, an utter grind. It’s R38 run in both directions and measure on my bike is exactly 10 miles. I think 10 reps on the same hill will probably mash your brain up. Good luck.

43. 30 minutes gentle running. Use this as a recovery session.

44. Benchmark A. Record and beat your time.

45. 40 minute trail run. Get some climbs in.

46. Hill work. Find a climb that takes about 3-4 minutes to run. Climb hard, jog back down x 5.

47. Reverse the direction of your Benchmark A.

48. 45 minutes, steady running. Nothing too challenging.

49. 4 minutes on, 2 minutes off, 60 minutes.

50. 1.5 mile timed run. Go hell for leather and aim to get at least below 10 minutes. A flat course is best.

Ok, so there you are. I’m afraid a bit of planning is needed to adapt these to your own situation but the aim is to make it suitable for your individual needs and to give you some ideas to work with. I can run some of these for 5 days at a time but the later runs will need some recovery time despite increased levels of running fitness.

Kevin Perry
09-06-2009, 03:11 PM
Thanks Matt,

I think I can adapt that to my plan. Looks good and also looks like an ass kicker.