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Ken Rich
12-08-2009, 08:33 AM
http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/12/butyric-acid-ancient-controller-of.html

Some interesting stuff in this blog post by Stephan.

Ken

Garrett Smith
12-08-2009, 08:47 AM
Yeah...Paleo is so much better with butter.

Steven Low
12-08-2009, 11:00 AM
Great article.. finally finished it up today.

Already have started stepping up the butter consumption to get more good fats into my diet. I guess I'll step it up some more. :p

Mike Romano
12-08-2009, 11:03 AM
isn't hydroxybutyrate highest when in a state of ketosis? Any relation to butyrate?

Garrett Smith
12-08-2009, 11:55 AM
If you can't get raw grassfed butter, I highly recommend Kerrygold Irish butter (http://www.kerrygold.com/usa/product_butter.html). It's grassfed, but still pasteurized. It's always at Trader Joe's, I believe Whole Foods has it as well. Sooooooo good...

garrett stack
12-08-2009, 01:30 PM
or just come to Ireland and pig out on grassfed butter, beef , lamb and guinness :D

Ken Rich
12-08-2009, 03:58 PM
+1 on the Kerrygold butter.

Organic Valley makes a pastured and cultured butter which I'm also a fan of.

Ken

Mike Romano
12-08-2009, 08:25 PM
I retract my previous question. Google is a wonderful tool.

Darryl Shaw
12-09-2009, 05:55 AM
I know you all read Stephans blog post and thought "Mmmm...butter" instead of "I must eat more fibre so my intestinal flora increase endogenous production of butyric acid" so here's some points to consider before you all get too carried away with the idea that butter is the new superfood -

1: Your body can synthesize all the SFA's it needs so there is no requirement for a dietary source of butyric acid or any other SFA.

2: Any increase in dietary SFA's above 0g/d is associated with a linear rise in low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and consequently an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

3: Butter contains only 5–6% butyric acid so you'd need to eat it in fairly large quantities if you wanted to rely on it as a significant source of butyric acid.

Garrett Smith
12-09-2009, 06:03 AM
Mmmmmmmm...butter.
Why Butter Is Better (http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/butter.html)
This would come as a surprise to many people around the globe who have valued butter for its life-sustaining properties for millennia. When Dr. Weston Price studied native diets in the 1930's he found that butter was a staple in the diets of many supremely healthy peoples.

Darryl Shaw
12-09-2009, 06:13 AM
Mmmmmmmm...butter.
Why Butter Is Better (http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/butter.html)

I'm not suggesting that people should remove butter or other sources of SFA's from their diet completely, indeed doing so would require you to avoid a number of particularly nutritious foods, but people do need to be aware of the risks associated with needleslly increasing their SFA intake.

Garrett Smith
12-09-2009, 06:31 AM
Sure...some of the WAP people go absolutely crazy with their fat intake, absolutely.

Mike Romano
12-09-2009, 11:11 AM
Yeah, Darryl...I actually read it the same way, although I disagree that LDL levels are really a cause of heart disease. Robb mentioned acid/base balance as a reason to consume fruits/veggies, and I think butyrate gives these foods more utility than a lot of people give them credit for.

but I do have sources for ldl/heart disease....let me know what you think...

http://www.ahjonline.com/article/PIIS0002870308007175/fulltext

summary....LDL levels in patients with CAD have decreased over the past 40 years....if you have "healthy levels of cholesterol" (LDL less than 100) you are more likely to end up in the hospital.

and

http://atvb.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/24/3/498

low saturated fat diets with copious amounts of fruit/vegetables actually increased heart disease risk...something the authors attribute to the lack of saturated fat

Not saying a TON of fat is good...but there are certainly beneficial effects of having some saturated fat in the diet, even if it does raise LDL. Have a couple more studies for later, but I have to take a final now....

Darryl Shaw
12-11-2009, 06:24 AM
Yeah, Darryl...I actually read it the same way, although I disagree that LDL levels are really a cause of heart disease. Robb mentioned acid/base balance as a reason to consume fruits/veggies, and I think butyrate gives these foods more utility than a lot of people give them credit for.

but I do have sources for ldl/heart disease....let me know what you think...

http://www.ahjonline.com/article/PIIS0002870308007175/fulltext

summary....LDL levels in patients with CAD have decreased over the past 40 years....if you have "healthy levels of cholesterol" (LDL less than 100) you are more likely to end up in the hospital.

I'm a little short on time today so I've only had the chance to read the abstracts and skim through the rest of those studies but here goes anyway.........

Okay, unless I'm missing something that study suggests that current recommendations on healthy/safe LDL levels are a little high and maybe doctors should be looking for CVD in patients who are currently deemed to be at low risk of disease. Also doctors should be advising patients on ways to increase HDL levels, improve other lifestyle factors affecting disease risk etc.

and

http://atvb.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/24/3/498

low saturated fat diets with copious amounts of fruit/vegetables actually increased heart disease risk...something the authors attribute to the lack of saturated fat

Not saying a TON of fat is good...but there are certainly beneficial effects of having some saturated fat in the diet, even if it does raise LDL. Have a couple more studies for later, but I have to take a final now....

Having only skimmed through it I'd guess that the use of rapeseed and sunflower oils along with vegetable oil spreads instead of olive oil would explain the increased LDL oxidation over baseline levels. Regardless of that though it's clear that the high vegetable diet resulted in a lower rise in OxLDL than the low vegetable diet (19% vs 27% respectively). Conclusion - eat your veggies and you'll reduce your risk of CVD regardless of how crappy the rest of your diet is.

Garrett Smith
12-11-2009, 06:35 AM
Conclusion - eat your veggies and you'll reduce your risk of CVD regardless of how crappy the rest of your diet is.
This is something everyone can agree on, I hope. :D