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View Full Version : Lacrosse/Soccer strength and speed work


Jay Ashman
02-24-2010, 07:42 AM
not sure where to put this but I recently signed on two brothers as clients. One is a sought after soccer player who is looking at Duke for after HS and the other is still undecided where to continue playing lacrosse but he has an academic scholarship that will pay for the first two years of his schooling no matter where he goes (I forget the scholarship name, but I remember looking it up and its a good one)

The parents aren't concerned with me coaching the kids in skills, they have coaches for that, but want them to increase strength, speed and stamina.

Here is how the first day looks for them:

Warmups:
High Knees
Buttkickers
Skips
Walking Lunges with twist
Scapula Pushups
Shoulder Mobility

Explosive:
box jumps 3x20
quick feet 3 x 30 seconds (quick jumps with both feet together)
depth jumps 3x10

Strength:
box squats 7x3
trap bar deadlifts 5x5
GHD Raises 3xMAX
Upper Body is next session

Speed Drills:
acceleration cone drill 5x (5 cones set up, accelerate at each cone)
weave in/out 5x (run to cone, side step to the next, back to the next, etc.)

Cooldown/Abs:
Plank Holds 3xMAX time

Any suggestions, praise, criticism, advice would be appreciated.

Grissim Connery
02-24-2010, 09:47 AM
OL?

Why separate upper body?

Grip strength for the Lax player. Sledge hammer rotations are probably most beneficial. I used to do those for lacrosse.

Harry Munro
02-24-2010, 12:04 PM
Core and hamstring work for football/soccer!

Jay Ashman
02-24-2010, 03:33 PM
OL?

Why separate upper body?

Grip strength for the Lax player. Sledge hammer rotations are probably most beneficial. I used to do those for lacrosse.

I separate because my sessions are one hour long and there isn't enough time to cram in everything I want to do in one session.

the lacrosse player bowed out anyway, the one kid doing it is a Soccer player who made all-county this year... his is a sophomore, he should make all-state next year.

OL? after I get him a base strength level. Right now getting him stronger and working on plyos will make him a better player already, down the road we'll add stuff to it.

Keep in mind that was only one session, todays. Not an overall template.

Harry, box squats do that my man. :) plus my cooldowns always consist of some pretty intense direct core work.

Allen Yeh
02-24-2010, 04:20 PM
Off season?

Blake McCarthy
02-24-2010, 04:36 PM
Looks pretty solid for a first session. I think your focus on the posterior chain is key as knee injuries are very common in soccer. What position does the kid play?

Jay Ashman
02-24-2010, 04:45 PM
Off season?

unfortunately the kid plays year round... between all star teams, travelling squads, tournaments and what not... I asked him how many weeks does he have off from practice/games.... he said 3 all year. So his offseason is almost non-existent. It makes training a lot harder because he plays year round and the periodization schedule I wanted to do is pretty much balled up and thrown out. I don't want to work the kid to the bone, but I do want to do stuff for him he will never do on his own.

Thanks, Blake. I recognize the value of a sick posterior chain. He's a forward.

Allen Yeh
02-25-2010, 04:25 AM
Any glaring dysfunctions right off the bat?

Are you doing lower/upper/total or lower/upper/lower/upper...etc?

I'd think about the Bret Conteras glute stuff. Can try to nip any future hamstring problems in the bud. It'd be pretty easy to incorporate into the warmup for the first part and then adding 1-2 exercises for the rest of it. Something to think about.

Perhaps throw in a unilateral leg movement per session rather than box squats and trap bar DL's? Like box squats and single leg RDLS' one lower body day and then trap bar DL's and split squats the next time.

Being that this kid has no off-season and you want to work him without burying him I guess you will see how he responds to having the plyos, strenght stuff and speed drills all together.

BFS DOT drill? I'm a big fan of that just in general maybe a good addition when training a HS age kid?

Hope these help but if something seems like it's BS let me know. This is all conjecture on my part.

James Evans
02-25-2010, 06:51 AM
Perhaps throw in a unilateral leg movement per session rather than box squats and trap bar DL's? Like box squats and single leg RDLS' one lower body day and then trap bar DL's and split squats the next time.

Allen, are you thinking DeFranco style? Off the top of my head:

1. ME Lower lift
2. Unilateral Lift - lunges/split squats/step ups/single leg RDLs etc
3. Hamstring/Posterior chain

I think the single leg stuff is fine if time permits, not sure if Jay really needs to worry though.

Allen Yeh
02-25-2010, 07:10 AM
To be honest if that is what it's called sure! The only Defranco stuff I've read about is the simple six and elite 8 warmups. I guess great minds must think alike!

I thought it'd be a good idea rather than having 2 big bilateral lifts, have one big lift and one unilateral, and one PC (like from the glute article). since that is how I try to program my stuff nowadays and just seems like a good idea.

James Evans
02-25-2010, 07:23 AM
Like single leg dls.
Loathe split squats*.
Step ups underated.
Ambivalent to lunges.

*Balance/comfort issues = Do I just suck at them?

All are time consuming and leave you sore.

I would expect a lot of single leg work to be coming in the speed/agilty drills and the skill work.

Jay Ashman
02-25-2010, 07:52 AM
Any glaring dysfunctions right off the bat?

Are you doing lower/upper/total or lower/upper/lower/upper...etc?

I'd think about the Bret Conteras glute stuff. Can try to nip any future hamstring problems in the bud. It'd be pretty easy to incorporate into the warmup for the first part and then adding 1-2 exercises for the rest of it. Something to think about.

Perhaps throw in a unilateral leg movement per session rather than box squats and trap bar DL's? Like box squats and single leg RDLS' one lower body day and then trap bar DL's and split squats the next time.

Being that this kid has no off-season and you want to work him without burying him I guess you will see how he responds to having the plyos, strenght stuff and speed drills all together.

BFS DOT drill? I'm a big fan of that just in general maybe a good addition when training a HS age kid?

Hope these help but if something seems like it's BS let me know. This is all conjecture on my part.

he's pretty balanced actually... he played lacrosse, basketball, football and soccer and his running is sound, he jumps well, squat is stable, etc. He won't be hard to work with at all.

lower/upper/total will be the agenda.

I am trying to keep the training from killing him because he has practices and games so I am lowering the load I usually do for offseason stuff, it will be a work in progress since I have nothing to maintain for in-season work, this is his first time setting foot in a gym.

Good call on the unilateral stuff, I was actually thinking about doing some uni work but haven't decided on it, but it definitely cannot hurt at all, and it will only help. But... he is also coming from square one in the gym, not as an athlete, so at this point just getting him stronger and more explosive will do wonders for him.

DOT drill is great, I have that already in my arsenal for future sessions for sure.

his endurance is good, so all my rests between sprints, plyos, agility are 20 seconds. I don't do distance running, that is on him, so when we do a sprint drill he won't be resting long at all. Let's just say yesterday he was getting winded before the lifting.

My thinking is that you work speed and explosiveness first before lifting so he is not worn out from lifting to be able to move fast and explode. Thoughts on that?

James Evans
02-25-2010, 08:03 AM
My thinking is that you work speed and explosiveness first before lifting so he is not worn out from lifting to be able to move fast and explode. Thoughts on that?

(1) Speed/Power/Explosive/High skill first then (2) the heavy shit. Might even be worth knocking it on the head with (1) if/when the quality of movement drops off.

Allen Yeh
02-25-2010, 08:32 AM
Like single leg dls.
Loathe split squats*.
Step ups underated.
Ambivalent to lunges.

*Balance/comfort issues = Do I just suck at them?

All are time consuming and leave you sore.

I would expect a lot of single leg work to be coming in the speed/agilty drills and the skill work.

I loathe split squats as well but damn if they don't kick your ass.

single leg dl variations
splits squat variations (rear leg elevated, front leg elevated, db, barbell FS grip...etc)
lunge variations
single leg squat (from a box or bench) are good as well

not a big fan of step ups here either

Allen Yeh
02-25-2010, 08:33 AM
(1) Speed/Power/Explosive/High skill first then (2) the heavy shit. Might even be worth knocking it on the head with (1) if/when the quality of movement drops off.

What he said.

James Evans
02-25-2010, 08:46 AM
Try this version if you haven't already, DeFranco stuck it in the WSFSB lite article he did for T-promo:

Skater Squat - Rear foot elevated, lower yourself, come back up half way, go back down, back up to the start = 1 rep.

Evil mofo.

Allen Yeh
02-25-2010, 09:35 AM
Ouch.

James Evans
02-25-2010, 09:42 AM
Ouch.

It's one of those exercises where you think Why am I doing? This has stopped the fun.

Alex Bond
02-25-2010, 10:22 AM
I think you've got the right idea doing no endurance stuff. He'll have that covered by going to practice and doing games.

Like single leg dls.
Loathe split squats*.
Step ups underated.
Ambivalent to lunges.

*Balance/comfort issues = Do I just suck at them?

All are time consuming and leave you sore.

I would expect a lot of single leg work to be coming in the speed/agilty drills and the skill work.

I think the single leg stuff should be kept to a minimum out of the warmup. If you've got time and energy out the wazoo, go nuts with single-leg stuff, but given that he is in-season all year, I'd rather spend valuable time and energy on the real money-makers - squats, deadlifts, cleans, etc, and leave the single leg stuff for the warmup/agility drills. And as above with endurance, he'll be doing a rep of single leg work every time he kicks the ball at practice - why do more in the weight room?

Jay Ashman
02-25-2010, 12:59 PM
I generally don't do single-leg work too much, its worth a shot to try it out, but I always had great results with the basics, especially with young kids. Imbalances tend to work themselves out when you get a kid stronger.

plus I'm not Mike Boyle, I believe in the power of the squat ;)

If I had this kid more than 2 days a week 1 hour each shot, I would experiment more, but results need to happen so I don't usually try out new theories in situations like this, I stick to what is proven to work.

And I always go speed/explosive/skill/lifting. My reasons are because I don't want to train a kid to be explosive when his muscles are fatigued from a 8x2 box squat session.

My reasons for box squats are simple. I don't give a shit about his back squat, athletes don't have to be powerlifters, they have to be strong and explosive, having a strong box squat always translates into a strong squat, so why not get the best of both worlds by adding the element of explosiveness to it?

I will argue that I can train high school kids just as effectively as most, if not better, because I will work more on the core movements and not try to prove how smart I am or how many apparatus I can put them on.

Pro-athletes; however, is a different story, I am working on getting more knowledge so I can take a good athlete one day and make him better... that takes time and experience and I hope one day I will have that chance.

James Evans
02-26-2010, 02:47 AM
I generally don't do single-leg work too much, its worth a shot to try it out, but I always had great results with the basics, especially with young kids. Imbalances tend to work themselves out when you get a kid stronger.

plus I'm not Mike Boyle, I believe in the power of the squat ;)

If I had this kid more than 2 days a week 1 hour each shot, I would experiment more, but results need to happen so I don't usually try out new theories in situations like this, I stick to what is proven to work.

And I always go speed/explosive/skill/lifting. My reasons are because I don't want to train a kid to be explosive when his muscles are fatigued from a 8x2 box squat session.

My reasons for box squats are simple. I don't give a shit about his back squat, athletes don't have to be powerlifters, they have to be strong and explosive, having a strong box squat always translates into a strong squat, so why not get the best of both worlds by adding the element of explosiveness to it?

I will argue that I can train high school kids just as effectively as most, if not better, because I will work more on the core movements and not try to prove how smart I am or how many apparatus I can put them on.

Pro-athletes; however, is a different story, I am working on getting more knowledge so I can take a good athlete one day and make him better... that takes time and experience and I hope one day I will have that chance.

Good stuff Jay. Keep us updated.

2 hours a week - do the stuff that's proved to work.

Steven Low
02-26-2010, 06:58 AM
As long as you teach your guys to get strong you should be fine.

ALL of the non-contact problems I've seen in soccer are valgus injuries because of collapsing knees etc. (because of cutting and such) ESPECIALLY in girls.

As long as you're making them strong with correct biomechanical patterns you're doing a great service by cutting injury potential down. Performance is just gravy. :)

Jay Ashman
02-26-2010, 08:50 AM
Yea for some reasons girls are more susceptible to knee injuries than men, not sure the exact reason why... strength?

I'll do my best, talked to the mother yesterday, she said he loved the training. I stressed to her that I want to work with him for a while because I feel he will be an excellent college athlete and he'll need to be physically ready for that beyond his natural abilities. She agreed.

One brother isn't doing it because he doesn't have much interest in training hard, but the other brother (who is looking at Duke for soccer) is all for it.

Steven Low
02-26-2010, 01:11 PM
Q-angle in the knee (from wider hips) = greater torque on the knee = more valgus problems.

Plus they have less muscle mass than men from less testosterone.

So you get something like a 6-10 fold increased knee injury rate depending on the sport. Hence why proper strength and conditioning is critical for women in particular.

Allen Yeh
02-26-2010, 01:56 PM
Try this version if you haven't already, DeFranco stuck it in the WSFSB lite article he did for T-promo:

Skater Squat - Rear foot elevated, lower yourself, come back up half way, go back down, back up to the start = 1 rep.

Evil mofo.

You're an evil mofo for bringing this to my attention!

At least I wasn't foolish enough to try these with a load today. Talk about leg burning, regular BSS's are bad enough. I did BW with sets of 6 and it was bad.

Rafe Kelley
02-28-2010, 12:25 AM
@ Jay Ashman girls are more susceptible to knee injuries because of the q angle, that is severity of the ankle from the hip joint to knee joint the more severe the angle the higher the potential forces on the knee. I also think that heels and less general activity agrivate the problem as I see many girls who have severe medial collapse at both the ankle and knee joint due to limited dorsiflexion and poor glute function.

James Evans
03-01-2010, 01:58 AM
You're an evil mofo for bringing this to my attention!

At least I wasn't foolish enough to try these with a load today. Talk about leg burning, regular BSS's are bad enough. I did BW with sets of 6 and it was bad.

Ha! Good man.

At least I didn't get you do any running.

Mike Dykstra
03-01-2010, 10:51 AM
As an ex college D1 soccer player I would recommend single leg work. I ran into problems where my main plant leg would be stronger than my main shooting leg. Which in turn caused back issues and muscle in-balances.

Andy Robinson
03-01-2010, 05:06 PM
Are you Lennie's boy?