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Chris Butler
06-04-2010, 08:57 PM
Anyone doing/done these? Thoughts? Opinions?

I never really took them seriously.
http://www.overspeedtraining.com/legsart.htm

Kevin Perry
06-04-2010, 09:14 PM
I think step ups are useful, of course add heavy weight to them especially a loaded barbell.

Joe Hart
06-04-2010, 09:18 PM
So I didn't really read the article...I have read a few others, namely Wendler's 5/3/1 and the Beast Skills guy and they both seem to like step ups as an assistance to squating and doing pistols.

So I would like to start doing step ups when I get the money to buy a bench/box for step ups. In the grand tool box of things I think that it is something to keep in mind. It should just work to your goals.

Donald Lee
06-04-2010, 09:48 PM
I've heard Angel Spassov's name before, but I don't really know much about him. I wonder if Bondarchuk and others are being misrepresented in that article. I know Bondarchuk is highly regarded, and he has results as both an athlete and coach.

Here's an excerpt from an interview of Taranenko in 1987:

B.C. What strength exercises do you favor?


Taranenko: The back squat is the most important strength exercise. I usually squat every day, sometimes more than once-a-day. My best back squat is 380 kg (837 lbs). But this is with a two-second pause at the bottom.


B.C. How many reps per set?


Taranenko: Usually no more than three. However, I occasionally do sets of five for explosive speed. I can use 300 kg for sets of five, done rapidly. Typically, I pause at the bottom for a count of two, when doing squats.


B.C. Do you have problems with sore knees?


Taranenko: No.


B.C. Do you do front squats?


Taranenko: No. I used to do front squats about twice a week, but stopped some years when I was able to do 300 kg for three reps. At that point I felt I was way beyond what I need to recover effectively from the clean. And besides, that much weight is an excessive load on the chest.


B.C. Do you do bench step-ups and lunges?


Taranenko: Yes. I do the step-ups occasionally, just to exercise the legs while unloading the spine. The lunges are not big deal, I use them once in a while as a change of pace.

I've done the step up for long timed sets and for low reps. They were very effective in improving the strength endurance in my legs for running. I didn't stick with the low reps long enough to see any real results for that.

I could ask around on some other forums that have people who have read Bondarchuk's work for their opinions if anybody wants.

Here's are reviews of both volumes of Bondarchuk's "Transfer of Training in Sport":

http://www.mbingisser.com/2010/03/transfer-of-training-in-sports-volume-1/

http://www.mbingisser.com/2010/04/transfer-of-training-in-sports-volume-2/

Donald Lee
06-04-2010, 09:53 PM
Here's also an excerpt from an interview of Bondarchuk:

What is the major problem with US hammer throwing or US throwing in
general?

Bondarchuk: The system of technique and strength has not changed in hammer,
discus or shot for 20-30 years. In 1972 my technique was as good or better than
some top US hammer throwers today. That was 36 years ago, this should not be the case. The US is always thinking about maximum strength. Until the US realizes the research of special and dynamic strength, there will be minimal hammer throwers over 80 meters. After 1975 in Europe the average athlete no longer used a full squat, only quarter squats, step ups and jump squats. Maybe the US is too influenced by bodybuilding and power lifting which takes their focus away from
special strength. The US has not progressed technically in 40-50 years with the
hammer. There has been very little progress since Hal Connolly, outside of maybe
Deal but even Deal did not have near the technique he could have achieved. Deal's technique was 50/50, he did not push the ball but he also did not pull the ball.

robby mor
06-04-2010, 11:15 PM
Another tool in the toolbox.
No more and no less.
Squats are a must to create a good solid strength foundation, on top of this you should use various exersices to develop your individual potential.
Which exersices, frequency and so on are all part of the art of coaching

Mark Fenner
06-05-2010, 07:40 AM
I find that step-ups are my #1 goto exercise when my knees start aching while I am hiking. Two-three weeks of adding step-ups (note: adding, not replacing other leg work), and I'm usually good to go. I usually go for the 3 sets of 8 ballpark (always a good starting range).

Best,
Mark

Steve Shafley
06-05-2010, 12:13 PM
I'm pretty sure that article was a complete fabrication.

Kevin Perry
06-05-2010, 12:19 PM
well I didn't bother reading the article I just based my opinion on what was out of the 531 ebook and my own experience. Too many articles on the internet to read that I would rather go out and try it on my own and see how my body responds.

Chris Butler
06-05-2010, 12:42 PM
I'm pretty sure that article was a complete fabrication.How so?

Ben Moskowitz
06-10-2010, 08:21 PM
Mike Robertson probably has something to say about it in his new DVD "The Single Leg Solution." It's pricey by my standards, though: $97.

http://singlelegsolution.com/

Garrett Smith
06-11-2010, 06:34 AM
380kg back squat with two-second pause. Forgive me if I say I'd have to see it to believe it.

Shane Skowron
06-11-2010, 10:41 AM
Don't know much about step-ups for strength, but I know some endurance athletes who rely on high-rep step-ups for endurance, especially in the mountains. Rob Shaul is a big advocate of them.

However, it's the most boring exercise I've ever done in my entire life, no joke. 20 minutes and I was going crazy. This is coming from a guy who has run, rowed, swam, and metcon'd for hours at a time.

Brian DeGennaro
06-11-2010, 06:15 PM
I think I've heard a coach or two say they've seen Taranenko do a double at 350kg with a pause.

Chris Butler
06-11-2010, 07:57 PM
I think I've heard a coach or two say they've seen Taranenko do a double at 350kg with a pause.
That's probably high bar and ATG? AMAZING!

Gant Grimes
06-12-2010, 05:35 PM
I did these in the late 80s/early 90s when the
bodybuilders were doing them. I haven't done one or read an article about them since. Do mountain climbers with a weight vest if you want.

Steve Shafley
06-14-2010, 06:33 AM
So, elite olympic lifters do step ups so you think you ought to do them too? The issue I have with the article about Spassov and the step up is that it's basically unverified by anyone.

It sounds like the typical misdirection that came from foreign OL coaches when US OL coaches asked them questions they should have already known the answer too.

Also, I've seen samples of Yuri Sedykh's training under Bondarchuk, and they do include both squats and step ups. Single leg strength being dramatically more important to a hammer thrower than an Olympic lifter.

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~b.wagner/Throw/Documents/Training%20Top%20Level%20Hammer.pdf


1. Exercises for the legs included leg press, squat jumps,
hip/leg sled, squats. For the trunk., twisting and related
drills while the back was worked with Olympic lifts.

(d) Conditioning Exercises
Step-ups (height 60cm) 3X10 with 100kg, performed quickly
Delivery imitations 15kg plate X 15 each side
Hurdle jumps (100cm) 4X10
Trunk twisting 40kg plate 2x10
Trunk twisting 60kg plate 3x8
Hammer swings 9kg hammer x 15 on each side
Snatch 70% x 10 + ( 80% x 8-10) x4

Chris Butler
06-14-2010, 02:19 PM
So, elite olympic lifters do step ups so you think you ought to do them too? No actually just curious.

Will Peterson
06-22-2010, 03:36 PM
My feeling on step-ups (and this is without the weight of anything outside of experience) is that they are an undervalued exercise since they are not directly applicable to an olympic or power lift. The depth of the movement should be similar to that of a squat (prob 4 to 7 risers plus the step depending on height -- 12 to 20 inches) and they will be most beneficial with dumbbells. The reason for the height is the depth of a squat -- aim for at least a 90 degree leg bend. The reason for dumbbells is the grip work. There are more people stronger than me rather than weaker, but 8x per leg with 80lb dumbbells in my hands works the grip like few other exercises (esp on the 4th or 5th set). Do this workout on "off" days with Bulgarian split squats . . . add a little core work and you are done.

Now, get rid of back squats totally in place of step ups . . . I think that is a curve ball to athletes of a similar caliber. No one likes to give up their training structure.

John Vernon
06-24-2010, 08:12 AM
i do 'em with a loaded barbell overhead. less boring that way.

R. Alan Hester
06-24-2010, 10:05 AM
Don't know much about step-ups for strength, but I know some endurance athletes who rely on high-rep step-ups for endurance, especially in the mountains. Rob Shaul is a big advocate of them.

However, it's the most boring exercise I've ever done in my entire life, no joke. 20 minutes and I was going crazy. This is coming from a guy who has run, rowed, swam, and metcon'd for hours at a time.

As per Shaul's advice, I have been doing weighted step-ups in preparation for my Peru hiking trip (usually sets of 50 on 24" box with weight vest). And, yes, they are boring, so I have them as part of a circuit and listen to books on tape while working out.

Chris Butler
06-24-2010, 06:36 PM
I had no idea Rob Shaul was such an influence in the fitness community? I wish his gym wasn't completely out of my way.

Steve Shafley
06-25-2010, 05:41 AM
Only with a certain segment.

Shane Skowron
06-25-2010, 06:28 AM
He's a cool dude. Uses common sense. And oh yeah, he actually works out with his athletes.

Allen Yeh
06-25-2010, 06:59 AM
As per Shaul's advice, I have been doing weighted step-ups in preparation for my Peru hiking trip (usually sets of 50 on 24" box with weight vest). And, yes, they are boring, so I have them as part of a circuit and listen to books on tape while working out.

Ditto that...the other day rounds of 400m run and 50 stepupsw/45# pack ....the stepups weren't even hard it was just mind numbing and I did keep messing up my count when I was switching between left and right.

James Evans
06-28-2010, 05:28 AM
10 Step Ups
Manmakers with sensible dbs
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1

So, that's 100 step ups followed by 10 manmakers then 90 step ups followed by 9 manmakers etc.

All done wearing a 20kg vest or pack.

I did this recently in prep for a little expedition here in the UK and it sucked more than I remembered. Utterly mindnumbing. Cheers Rob Shaul.

I had planned to do a lot of step ups and leg blasters over the last 12 months as per the Mountain Athlete approach and instead I just did the stuff I enjoyed, back squats, dls, box jumps, a bit of skipping and a lot of walking. I've done the odd high rep bodyweight squat session as a finisher and I've run only 6 times this year (one of which was 9 reps of hill sprints).

The weekend before last I climbed the 3 highest mountains in the UK in under 24 hours and I didn't feel let down by my training whatsoever. On a global stage Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon are hardly monstrous but they're not easy in the same day.

Take home? Strength + a bit of circuit type work + sport specific (long walks with a back, often into the early morning) hits the spot. Overthinking and seeking the silver bullet doesn't.

James Evans
06-28-2010, 05:30 AM
PS I like Rob and miss being able to read both MA and Military Athlete. But I've discussed and agreed with Shaf in the past on some of the 'silly shit'.

R. Alan Hester
06-28-2010, 09:04 AM
a bit of skipping
.

As in rope or through a field, with a flower in your hair? How long were your walks?

I have avoided the leg blasters. The step-ups are nice as I have a strength imbalance between my legs, so that is working its way out.

James Evans
06-28-2010, 09:20 AM
Through a field with a tambourine in my hand.

I should have remembered you guys jump rope. Over here boxers and 8 year old girls skip!

Last one we did was 22 miles. I did a quite a few 10 milers on my own.