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View Full Version : if you could start OLY lifting again?


dave beers
08-11-2010, 03:55 PM
What would you do different? Training, Rest, program set up, anything

I'm just starting OLY lifting from a background of PL'ing and Strongman. I'm meeting with a coach in a couple weeks to learn the lifts. In the mean time i am doing squats, front squat, snatch balances+overhead squats, and some push jerks just about every day.

In most things i have pursued i have found that the best way to get good at something is too surround yourself in it. Part of that is learning from those who have been there and made mistakes along the way. Feel free to share your thoughts and what you would do if you could start over. Thanks

Greg Everett
08-11-2010, 04:15 PM
be 8 years old and chinese.

dave beers
08-11-2010, 04:27 PM
wow, thanks greg. I was gonna buy your book but now that you summed it up for me i guess i'll just not bother:rolleyes:

Greg Everett
08-11-2010, 06:17 PM
Your question was "what would you do different?" That's what I would do. You posed a question describing an impossible feat (time travel) so I didn't limit myself to the possible.

Don't give up yet; it was a joke.

here's one article for you - http://www.pendlay.com/Converting-to-Weightlifting_df_43.html

You're already doing the first best thing, and that's working with a weightlifting coach (I'm assuming that's what he/she is - you didn't actually specify what kind of coach).

Spend time, as you've started to, perfecting the basic positions. Without this foundation, it won't matter how well you understand what your coach wants you to do, because you won't be able to do it physically. Build up the volume and weight very gradually to give your joints time to become conditioned so that by the time you're on an actual program, you're not slowed or stopped by tendinitis and the like.

And you're on the right track thinking that the best way to go about becoming a weightlifter is to spend as much time as possible with weightlifters. It's one thing to read and watch videos; it's another to be immersed in the atmosphere and the culture, and the latter is invaluable.

Christine Petty
08-11-2010, 09:40 PM
I would have started it when I was first introduced to it at 22 instead of now at 29. :D

Gant Grimes
08-12-2010, 03:54 AM
I have lifted in front of Rip, Pendlay, and Greg, yet I am still a crappy weightlifter.

Clearly I should have learned from Couch.

Greg Everett
08-12-2010, 10:35 AM
that's not fair.

i wasn't watching.

Michael Hartman
08-12-2010, 01:45 PM
I would have never performed the power variations (power clean, power snatch) for as long a possible. My biggest problem, and many of the other late starters I have worked with, was the inability to get under the bar. I spent years performing power cleans for football with very little knee bend when receiving the bar, mostly just spreading the feet and leaning back. When I started training exclusively for weightlifting there was always a reliance to go back to that position when the weight was difficult.

Denver Buchanan
08-12-2010, 03:01 PM
be 8 years old and chinese.

This is my favorite answer.

As for my answer, I'd just echo was Greg and Glenn both say about initial conditioning and flexibility issues. In his article, Glenn points out specifically ankle, wrist, and shoulder flexibility. Those were the exact areas of my flexibility issues. If I could start over, I'd really focus DAILY on maximizing my flexibility in all areas, but especially those. I've had a couple injuries/tendonitis that I'm sure could have been avoided with a wiser approach that emphasized flexibility and correct positioning from the start.

John Alston
08-13-2010, 06:58 AM
Eat more meat and protein (needed in my start) and move up from a 77 to an 85 faster and with more aggression.

glennpendlay
08-13-2010, 03:08 PM
Not sure that this is COMPLETELY relevant to the discussion, but something that has coalesced in my mind in the last year or so is a prioritization of the following qualities for a beginner.

1.) Position

2.) Tempo

3.) Speed

4.) Weight

The short version is that you want the major positions attainable and correct before you move on (things like position at knee, start position, etc) Then you worry about tempo... that is not absolute speed, but the relative speeds of the different parts of the lift. you should be able to go through the movement, no matter how slowly, with the pull from the floor the slowest, speeding up slightly as you pass the knee, moving even faster as you execute the second pull and go under the bar. Once the tempo is right, and the movement speeds at different points are in the correct relation to each other, then you try to bring the absolute speed of the whole affair up to something appproximating a "real life" heavy attempt... of course all the while keeping position and tempo solid. Once you accomplish this, then its time to start adding weight.

If I were starting over as a beginner, I would want someone to force me to do this, it would have saved a lot of time. As a coach, I wish I would have thought more about this years ago. There are a lot of kids that I coached 10 years ago that would have been a lot better off had I realized this then.

I think I am gonna turn this into an article soon...

dave beers
08-13-2010, 05:36 PM
Not sure that this is COMPLETELY relevant to the discussion, but something that has coalesced in my mind in the last year or so is a prioritization of the following qualities for a beginner.

1.) Position

2.) Tempo

3.) Speed

4.) Weight

The short version is that you want the major positions attainable and correct before you move on (things like position at knee, start position, etc) Then you worry about tempo... that is not absolute speed, but the relative speeds of the different parts of the lift. you should be able to go through the movement, no matter how slowly, with the pull from the floor the slowest, speeding up slightly as you pass the knee, moving even faster as you execute the second pull and go under the bar. Once the tempo is right, and the movement speeds at different points are in the correct relation to each other, then you try to bring the absolute speed of the whole affair up to something appproximating a "real life" heavy attempt... of course all the while keeping position and tempo solid. Once you accomplish this, then its time to start adding weight.

If I were starting over as a beginner, I would want someone to force me to do this, it would have saved a lot of time. As a coach, I wish I would have thought more about this years ago. There are a lot of kids that I coached 10 years ago that would have been a lot better off had I realized this then.

I think I am gonna turn this into an article soon...

alot of great responses thank you to all but i really like this last bit by glenn. I was a kicker(football) in high school and college with a speciality in distance kick-offs/field goals.
Alot of guys thought because i was big(210lbs) or strong that i could kick so hard but it wasn't so. A good kick had to start with a solid position, accelerate with good tempo while all the while not getting out of control and losing position. In my last 3 steps(for kickoff) would be so fast but it was critical to stay controlled so that every once of energy was transferred to the ball and not wasted.
Last year i went out and tried kicking just for fun. I'm way stronger and faster than i was 6yrs ago but don't nearly have the distance because i forgot my starting position and my tempo sucks.

Oh well, thought that might be somewhat interesting. When i read what Glenn wrote a big light went off in my head and i competely understood what he was talking about.