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View Full Version : Catch Position and Shoulder Mobility


Edward Guzman
01-13-2011, 08:21 PM
I've been doing the lifts on my own for a while. Haven't been coached, yet.

I'd like to work on my catch position specifically as it relates to my shoulders and elbow positioning. I've seen some mobility work posted by KStarr, but I'd like to know if Greg or anyone hear may have advice on the issue.

Obviously practicing Cleans more often will probably help. But I'm not exclusively Oly lifting. I'm following Rut's Fitness Conduit albeit slightly modified with more speed work.

As I see it, the Problem: Elbows pointing to low indicating poor shoulder activation.

I've worked on my mobility tons but can't seem to get that bar in position right away.

Anyone's help will be greatly appreciated.

Andrew Wilson
01-13-2011, 10:07 PM
Edward,
When holding the bar in the catch position in the clean, are you resting the bar on your clavicle? Also, can you do this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DP4-0aPcpOk ?

Spencer Mackay
01-14-2011, 01:54 AM
Also make sure you work on your thoracic spine and scapular mobility, this may help you get your elbows higher.

Brian DeGennaro
01-14-2011, 06:21 AM
The rack position requires pretty much the same amount of scapular mobility as overhead. You need to allow the scapulae to upwardly rotate and protract slightly. Also, make sure you are trying to externally rotate the humerus in the rack position because if you internally rotate it you're going to lose plenty of stability in your upper back.

I'm just going to copy a post I made from Pendlay's forum.
"
I like prone Y's and variations from there, same with forward and backward facing wall slides. When you do it properly you should sort of feel your scap upwardly rotate/glide "through" your armpit.

Scap pushups (do them from the knees, it'll be easier to not use so much pecs) are popular but the variation I've found that works best is doing them up against a wall (almost upright) with a band between the wrist. Make sure the elbows are about shoulder level and shoulder width apart. When you protract, make sure you also try to externally rotate the humerus to pull the band apart, but do not let the elbows move. This one is brutal at getting the serratus active and it has a big payoff I've noticed."

Greg Everett
01-14-2011, 09:38 AM
As I see it, the Problem: Elbows pointing to low indicating poor shoulder activation.

Where the elbows are is not necessarily indicative of a problem. The question is where is the bar and where are your shoulders? As others have said, you need to protract and elevate the scapulae to create a space for the bar to rest behind the meat of the shoulders. See the photo on our main page from yesterday I believe - good angle showing the bar/shoulder position in the FS.

Edward Guzman
01-15-2011, 01:11 AM
Edward,
When holding the bar in the catch position in the clean, are you resting the bar on your clavicle? Also, can you do this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DP4-0aPcpOk ?

Lol. No, I can't do perform that reverse move. Although I do plenty of dislocates.

The bar is at my clavicle or most times, perhaps slightly on the front of the shoulders.
Present physical limitations i can think of; I don't have good external rotation. That is one thing i need to work on.
The other is that I don't bring my shoulders up very well. The latter I'm not so sure is a matter of limited mobility. I suspect I need to just get it right a few times and feel my way back to that.

Where bar ends up? I think i've had the bar nestled well on my shoulders twice. These were cleans and both times I felt like I got karate chopped in the throat.

So scap. mobility? I will look into these mobility exercises. (Youtube search).
To be honest, I don't know what protracted scapular is, but I have an idea about what it should feel like.

Thanks.

Brian DeGennaro
01-15-2011, 03:37 AM
Here is what should be going on:

http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap/muscularsystem/shouldermuscles/anteriormuscles/serratusanterior/tutorial.html

Protraction is the opposite of retraction; so instead of squeezing the scaps together you're trying to spread them apart. A simplified answer is lower trap and serratus are involved in upward rotation and protraction of the scap in order to go overhead and in the rack position.

Ken Urakawa
01-15-2011, 06:35 AM
Brian, that's a pretty cool link. Thanks-