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Frank Barosky
07-08-2011, 05:31 AM
Greg,

I'm in the process of reading your book "Olympic Weightlifting" and you talk about body proportions. The squat has always been difficult for me and I'm wondering if this has to do with the ratio of calf length to thigh length.

My ratio, calf to thigh is 1.33 to 1. I don't know how one takes standard measurements of this sort, but what I did to measure calf length was kneel on one knee (no shoes) and put the other foot flat on the floor, position my calf perpendicular to the floor, and measured from the floor to the top of my knee. To measure thigh length, I measured from the crease made by my torso and thigh (thigh at right angle to torso) to the end of my knee.

If I have done these measurements correctly, do you know if this average, short in the thigh, etc?

If anyone else has input, please comment.

Thank you.

Greg Everett
07-08-2011, 09:18 AM
If I'm reading your measurement description correctly, this sounds about right to me. In what way is the squat difficult for you?

Frank Barosky
07-08-2011, 10:47 AM
If I'm reading your measurement description correctly, this sounds about right to me. In what way is the squat difficult for you?

When I powerlifted many years ago, in spite of concentrating on improving my squat, it was out of proportion to my other lifts. My best official lifts were squat: 213 kg, BP: 155 kg, DL: 268 kg @ 75 kg bdwt.

I'm 30 years "down the road" now and doing weightlifting. Since my speed at this age leaves a lot to be desired, I'm hoping to compensate with some strength and I'd like to approach it in a way that takes into account my leverages if possible.

Greg Everett
07-12-2011, 12:00 PM
I mean specifically what is the limiter in your squat? Do you tip forward, do you lose your back posture, or do you simply not stand up?

Frank Barosky
07-13-2011, 04:57 AM
I mean specifically what is the limiter in your squat? Do you tip forward, do you lose your back posture, or do you simply not stand up?

Greg,

Thank you for your replies.

Although I squat below parallel, my glutes or hamstrings are never sore or seem to get fatigued. I come out of the bottom OK but as I get back up just a little above parallel, I lean forward and I tend to stall. If this is where the glutes are supposed to help - mine don't. Also, it seems impossible to keep my weight more toward my heels. I have very poor flexibility in my hamstrings and I'm working to correct that but it's a very slow process.

Regarding back posture, I noticed that powerlifters with big squats tended to be able to to squat deeply without their butt curling under as they went below parallel. My butt does curl under as I go below parallel. Does this mean my glutes "disengage" and never get back into the game?

Greg Everett
07-13-2011, 09:17 AM
Sounds like a flexibility issue largely - but don't focus solely on hamstrings; hit adductors and ankles as well. glutes tend to contribute more out of the bottom rather than above parallel, and if your pelvis is rolling back, that's in line with glute/hamstring contraction (or at least tightness).

Frank Barosky
07-13-2011, 10:43 AM
Sounds like a flexibility issue largely - but don't focus solely on hamstrings; hit adductors and ankles as well. glutes tend to contribute more out of the bottom rather than above parallel, and if your pelvis is rolling back, that's in line with glute/hamstring contraction (or at least tightness).

Again, thank you for your reply. I will do as you suggest.