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Zach Reed
08-29-2011, 01:46 PM
Looking for some critique from my max snatch and clean and jerks from today.

From my own limited knowledge of lifting, the most glaring issues with the lifts I see are not keeping my weight on my heels in the snatch catch and drive up, and need to catch the bar in a better split position in the jerk (more vertical front leg). Any other comments regarding technique would be greatly appreciated.

Snatches http://vimeo.com/28318444 10# all-time PR on final lift

C&J http://vimeo.com/28319373 20# all-time PR on final lift

Thanks

Matt Foreman
08-29-2011, 08:54 PM
You're having problems with keeping your feet flat in the bottom position because you're jumping forward. Think about keeping your bodyweight in the middle of your foot/keeping your shoulders over the bar just a little longer before you bring the bar to your hips and extend into the finish of the pull. It's an easy fix that you should be able to clear up with practice. And work on your upper body flexibility a little more in the snatch position.

Looks good overall. You're a good athlete and you have some tools.

Zach Reed
08-29-2011, 09:08 PM
You're having problems with keeping your feet flat in the bottom position because you're jumping forward. Think about keeping your bodyweight in the middle of your foot/keeping your shoulders over the bar just a little longer before you bring the bar to your hips and extend into the finish of the pull. It's an easy fix that you should be able to clear up with practice. And work on your upper body flexibility a little more in the snatch position.

Looks good overall. You're a good athlete and you have some tools.

Thanks for the comments. I know it's hard to tell through a video but do you think that it's the shoulders that need the most flexibility work?

Matt Foreman
08-29-2011, 09:32 PM
In the snatch, yeah. From that angle, the bar doesn't look like it's quite stable enough overhead. It looks like you're having to work to keep the bar overhead, instead of it looking like it's just locked over the ears. That's often because the shoulders/shoulder girdle is a little tight and the bar is wanting to pull forward. At least that's what it looks like from these particular videos.

Zach Reed
08-31-2011, 08:44 AM
anyone else...

Greg Everett
08-31-2011, 09:54 AM
Real quick for the snatch -

Flexibility all around - ankle, hip and upper back/shoulders. You need to be able to sit into that squat without your feel rolling in and do it comfortably. Spiderman lunges and russian baby makers all day long. And sit in a squat any chance you get. While down there, keeping your foot flat on the ground, lean both arms on one knee and close the ankle as much as possible. hold that stretch for a minute or so and do that as often as possible.

Shoulders are definitely a bit tight as well, although some of that will improve when you can sit in better in that squat and the weight isn't pulling you forward from being off balance during the lift (this is true for the squat as well like Matt said). All manner of pec stretches, hang from bar and push your chest through, snatch press, etc.

As far as the lift itself goes - the main problem is that you're shifting forward into the bar as it passes your knees. Stay back on your heels and stay over the bar until it's up in your hips. Always think of pushing the bar back into your hips rather than moving your hips to the bar (even though the hips do move forward as they extend).

You do a good job of getting under it, keeping it pretty close, etc., but your weight is off balance before then, so you are going to keep getting pulled forward like that and be unstable in the bottom until you correct the balance issue during the pull. Try halting snatch deadlifts or segment deadlifts/pulls, and then combine those w snatches in a complex. I have seen a lot of success making lifters do a segment pull or two followed by a snatch. Pull to the knee, pause 2 sec, pull to the hip, pause 2 sec, finish pull, return to floor, snatch. You can add a pause 1" off the floor as well if you want and eventually reduce it down to a pause at the hip only.

Congrats on the PR.

Greg Everett
08-31-2011, 09:58 AM
BTW, it looks like you're looking at the floor during at least the initial pull. Find a focal point straight ahead or slightly above and maintain it throughout the lift. Looking down can encourage you to shift forward like you're doing; in any case, changing your focal point during the lift is disorienting. A constant focal point will allow you to orient yourself in space better and maintain better balance.

Greg Everett
08-31-2011, 10:07 AM
OK, CJ -

First, nice work on another PR. Now I will pick on you:

Everything I said about the snatch applies here. Better hip and ankle flexibility will give you a more solid and balanced squat and allow you to lift much more.

Just like w the snatch, you're shifting into the bar as it passes your knees. This gets your balance too far forward and also gets your shoulders behind the bar too soon, which limits your power at the top of the pull. The halting/segment DL/Pull will help here too.

The bar swings out a bit as you're finishing and starting to pull under, which will not only continue pulling you forward out of balance, but will greatly slow the turnover. Engage your back off the floor and continue pushing the bar into yourself as you finish and pull under.

Jerk - you have a good split position and a knack for getting yourself under the bar, which is a really good start. But again, you let your weight shift forward as you dip and drive, which pushes the bar forward and forces you to chase it. When you get set to jerk, take in your air, tighten up, tighten your quads, and shift all the way back on your heels. Stay all the way back - feel the pressure on your heels through the whole dip and then drive through the heels on the way up - think of pushing the bar backward slightly to position it over the back of your neck.

When you're in that split, aim to have your weight balanced pretty evenly between the front and back foot - you should be able to recover by stepping back a 1/3 of the way with the front foot. Having to step forward to recover is a good indicator for you that your weight is too heavy on the front foot.

Bee Brian
08-31-2011, 11:10 AM
anyone else...

My turn.



Starting position:

Although it is important to have an arched and tight torso when pulling initially, you should never use that as a compensation for letting the bar start in front of you (which is very apparent with your snatches).

The reason why you are forced to catch the weight (with the snatches) out in front is because the barbell trajectory is forward. Although I do not recommend you to purposely jump backwards when exploding, you are way better off jumping backwards than keeping your current habit as it is.

That, I believe, is the biggest issue with your snatches.



For the Cleans...

Same note with the snatches. Make sure your shoulders are in front of the bar before the second and third pull. Also, be patient with the third pull. You extend your legs prematurely...

Zach Reed
08-31-2011, 12:02 PM
Awesome. Thanks for the tips everyone.

I lift on my own, so any advice/nitpicking/ pointers/ect. is much appreciated.

Zach Reed
08-31-2011, 01:36 PM
Real quick for the snatch -

Flexibility all around - ankle, hip and upper back/shoulders. You need to be able to sit into that squat without your feel rolling in and do it comfortably. Spiderman lunges and russian baby makers all day long. And sit in a squat any chance you get. While down there, keeping your foot flat on the ground, lean both arms on one knee and close the ankle as much as possible. hold that stretch for a minute or so and do that as often as possible.

Shoulders are definitely a bit tight as well, although some of that will improve when you can sit in better in that squat and the weight isn't pulling you forward from being off balance during the lift (this is true for the squat as well like Matt said). All manner of pec stretches, hang from bar and push your chest through, snatch press, etc.

As far as the lift itself goes - the main problem is that you're shifting forward into the bar as it passes your knees. Stay back on your heels and stay over the bar until it's up in your hips. Always think of pushing the bar back into your hips rather than moving your hips to the bar (even though the hips do move forward as they extend).

You do a good job of getting under it, keeping it pretty close, etc., but your weight is off balance before then, so you are going to keep getting pulled forward like that and be unstable in the bottom until you correct the balance issue during the pull. Try halting snatch deadlifts or segment deadlifts/pulls, and then combine those w snatches in a complex. I have seen a lot of success making lifters do a segment pull or two followed by a snatch. Pull to the knee, pause 2 sec, pull to the hip, pause 2 sec, finish pull, return to floor, snatch. You can add a pause 1" off the floor as well if you want and eventually reduce it down to a pause at the hip only.

Congrats on the PR.

Ps. What are these russian baby makers you speak of?

Greg Everett
08-31-2011, 02:19 PM
slightly wider than normal squat stance, hands on the tops of your feet, get your elbows inside your thighs as deep toward your pelvis as possible and then sit the hips down into a squat, sitting on the elbows and pushing out. the idea is to push the proximal ends of the femurs out rather than the distal ends, i.e. spread the legs at the pelvis rather than the knees. you should feel it in the adductor/hamstring origins.

Zach Reed
08-31-2011, 02:44 PM
slightly wider than normal squat stance, hands on the tops of your feet, get your elbows inside your thighs as deep toward your pelvis as possible and then sit the hips down into a squat, sitting on the elbows and pushing out. the idea is to push the proximal ends of the femurs out rather than the distal ends, i.e. spread the legs at the pelvis rather than the knees. you should feel it in the adductor/hamstring origins.

This sounds awful but I'm sure it'll help with my tight adductors. Will incorporate daily. Thanks again.

Tyson Wright
09-03-2011, 06:13 PM
Does anyone have a video/description showing the "russian baby makers"? Google not being friendly on this.

Greg Everett
09-03-2011, 06:34 PM
Tyson-

There's a description above. You won't find anything else on it because it's my name for the stretch. Might be my stretch too but I'm sure someone else has done it somewhere.

I have a blog post on it planned that will have a photo or a video to illustrate better.