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View Full Version : Multipurpose wooden squat racks...


Rick Deckart
04-14-2007, 11:37 AM
While not completely finished they are now fully operational and I would bet my salary that none on this board or P&B could outsquat these racks. Will post pictures and description later so stay tuned if you are interested in the result of six hours work and 70 EUR investment...

Scotty Hagnas
04-14-2007, 04:03 PM
I'm looking forward to seeing them!

Thanks,

Scotty Hagnas
CrossFit Portland

Rick Deckart
04-14-2007, 10:48 PM
This is just a teaser and as I can't place all pictures into one post here go the first five construction pictures...

Rick Deckart
04-14-2007, 10:59 PM
The next batch...

These racks are not finished yet. I am working on three extension pieces per rack so that the height is adjustable from 1000mm to ~1210mm. The lower ballast board is now just a rough scrap wood job (still good enough to hold 200--300kg) and I will change that too. Will place my weight plates and KBs there. Due to the low center of gravity it is next to impossible that the racks will ever topple over. The two boards on top which secure the barbell are removable, and voila you have two 1000mm height jumping boxes.

That's a 21mm birch multiplex plate on top and there is no way anyone on any board squats enough to break this plates...

If there is interest I will write a short description how to build these racks including parts list and tools list.

Rick Deckart
04-15-2007, 03:50 AM
I will add some additional support structures but they are already fully functional and my elephant blocks can be placed on top safely for rack jerks...

Rick Deckart
04-15-2007, 07:22 AM
...is from an old german book about weightlifting. Excellent resource BTW.

Rick Deckart
04-16-2007, 12:33 PM
Sorry for this patchwork thread, I should delete all posts and write a conscise tutorial instead, won't have time to do that before weekend.

Tested the rack today with 342kg, no problem at all. I would have put 500kg on the bar but I ran out of weights in my barn. Will repeat that test next weekend and place also my two 24kg and my 40kg bell my 16kg bell all my small plates and probably also my dumbells on the bar. That should be ~500kg. Pretty confident that the rack will do just fine.

They are still not finished, two support structures need to be added, basically two wooden X's, one directly under the top plywood/multiplex plate and one at the lower frame. These will reduce torque to an absolute minimum and increase the breaking strength of the top plate considerably. Decided to build three extensions per rack, 50mm, 100mm and 150mm, which makes the rack adjustable from 1000mm to 1300mm in 50mm steps. Each step can be used for depth jumps, box jumps etc. as well. The rack will get a good paint job so that I can store them outside when I finally get one of Sumo's 2/4 racks.

It is suprisingly easy to load the bar, and there is definitely no risk to loose a finger when you re-rack the bar.

BTW if one doesn't mind the look they make for good cocktail tables for a garden party, too.

Chris Forbis
04-16-2007, 03:19 PM
BTW if one doesn't mind the look they make for good cocktail tables for a garden party, too.

One can never have enough cocktail tables.

Cool stuff. Makes me long for the day, distant in the future, when I'll have my own place and garage gym.

Rick Deckart
04-16-2007, 11:59 PM
One can never have enough cocktail tables.

Exactly.

Cool stuff. Makes me long for the day, distant in the future, when I'll have my own place and garage gym.

It has disadvantages, but in my 'barn gym' I could train the whole night if I wanted...

BTW using three extensions (400mm x 400mm x (50mm,100mm,150mm)) gives me two ply-boxes which are adjustable from 700mm to 1300mm in 50mm increments---I am always surprised what you can build for ~70 EUR.

Pierre Auge
04-17-2007, 04:35 AM
Finally someone who uses real measurments! Thank you for using mm, thank you thank you thank you!

Allen Yeh
04-17-2007, 05:16 AM
Finally someone who uses real measurments! Thank you for using mm, thank you thank you thank you!

To be honest as a engineer I'd prefer if everyone in the US just jumped to the metric system since that system makes a heck of a lot more sense than pounds and inches...etc.

Brian Sullivan
04-17-2007, 09:59 AM
Thanks for the plan. I was planning on building some outdoor squat racks (if spring ever comes) using a bucket full of concrete and some 4x6's sticking out of them, but this looks like a better design for me.

Rick Deckart
04-17-2007, 10:13 AM
You are welcome Brian.

Rick Deckart
04-17-2007, 10:29 AM
As it looks I have to work Saturday and Sunday...

So I will start the building plan in this post and continue this on a more or regular basis. The design is from an old eastern german book on weightlifting. Still the only book in german on olympic weightlifting. I modified it to fit my needs, as I need some place to store my plates which are usually lying around in my barn gym and because I thought that lowering the COG would be a good idea. I realized that with a little extra effort this could be used as plyometric box too.

The tools:

power saw
mitre box saw (for solid angle cuts in several planes)
alternatively and what I used a good alround japanese saw (the best handsaws on earth)
Power drill with torx bit so that you don't have to fix all screws by hand (which would be a super workout...)
wood glue (I use this only for the additional support structures)
a tape measure, preferably in mm
adjustable angle, or bevel
a jig, which you have to construct from wood
one or two large clamps
torx screws, preferably M25 5mm x 50mm, although M20 4mm x 50mm should do fine, if you have the money buy self countersink screws, else you will need a countersink too.



The dimension:

base: 500mm x 500mm
top: 400mm x 400mm x 21mm (birch multiplex plywood, the thicker the better)
height: ~1000mm
legs: 53mm x 53mm x 987mm (you can choose the length between 1000--1200mm as you like) the odd length was choosen because the 2000mm beams turned out to be ~1990mm long...
outer frames: made from 93mm x 20mm boards



Material list:

torx screws, preferably M25 5mm x 50mm, although M20 4mm x 50mm should do fine, if you have the money buy self countersink screws, else you will need a countersink too.
wooden beams 53mm x 53mm x 2000mm
wooden boards 93mm x 20mm x 2000mm
two wooden boards, preferably multiplex >21mm thickness, 400mm x 400mm
a scrap wood plate ~500mm x ~500mm to construct a jig.


to be continued...
:

Rick Deckart
05-21-2007, 08:04 AM
Will finish the plan later, just some quick pictures of the 50mm extensions. I have used the rack extensively over the course of the last weeks and sofar they work perfect. Nothing to complain and plenty of safety headroom.

But I am busy on another larger project... Operation Barnstorm :cool:

Derek Simonds
05-21-2007, 11:26 AM
Nice work Peter. Those squat racks and pulling racks rock! I look forward to you adding more information to this thread as you progress.

I can't wait to see operation barnstorm.

Joe Hart
07-09-2008, 07:20 PM
Peter,

Hopefully you are still around...How are your racks holding up? Do you think they are sturdy enough to handle doing heavy rack jerks (having the bar dropped on them)?

Rick Deckart
07-10-2008, 01:09 AM
Peter,

Hopefully you are still around...How are your racks holding up?

Not really, but to answer your other question, the racks are holding up fine and I seriously doubt that I will ever out-squat them, even if I should double my max back-squat (150kg -> 300kg).

Do you think they are sturdy enough to handle doing heavy rack jerks (having the bar dropped on them)?

I wouldn't use it for that purpose on a regular basis but I dropped weights around 90-100kg on it a couple of times without a problem. However doing that frequently would wear them down besides the platform is a little bit to small for such use and so I have plans to build some jerk boxes in the next two or three months. These will be sturdy enough to deal with anything anyone may drop on it.

If I use the racks for jerks I usually take the bar out of the rack, do the jerk or jerk repetitions, drop the bar, deload it for an easy powerclean, place the bar into the rack, load it again and immediately do the next jerk etc. pp.

The main reasons I prefer these racks over standard racks is that there is no possibility to jam the fingers and I can use these for bottom up overhead squats, partial squats if I wanted to train these, box jumps and a couple of other things. Especially presses from the rack are a lot easier for me than from a standard rack.