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James Evans
04-20-2007, 03:55 AM
Allen,

Thought we'd have a new thread for this.

Basically I think you need to bite the bullet and run. Lot a talk about short stuff and sprints and the Xfit approach but if you are required to run regularly you need to be conditioned to do it. This should be about more than just passing a test. Running distance may be an archaic way to train soldiers but it's the way that it is still done. When CrossFit becomes the chosen method then do CrossFit. If you are required to perform 18 pull ups with an overhand grip you don't spend your life training chins. It's like telling someone how to sprint by doing everything but sprint.

In July 2001 I came back from a trip to Australia and realised I was pretty off the pace. 18 months of working stupid hours and smoking and drinking far too much had taken me from being able to bang out 12 mile cross country/trail efforts with impunity to being exhausted after a mile. So I drew up a programme for myself.

I had the advantage of having a few set runs of varying length up my sleeve although I'd never really recorded the times properly. These became benchmark runs and I scheduled sessions around them. I started a training diary that I recorded my activity in every day of the week and have not stopped doing so to this day.

Ok, I'm a comfortable runner, you hate it, but I am by no means a natural distance runner. I ran with the cross country guys for a term at school and just got blown away by them. Freaks.

Couple of theories behind the programme. Most beginners or those returning to running go off too hard. Either you don't know how to pace yourself or you think because you were running 45 minutes a couple of years back then no reason why can't you do that now. You feel like shit for the first 5 minutes and then you give up. The majority of people who start running and quit, quit in that first 5 minutes when the energy systems change over. We need to start steadily.

Programmes written by serious runners are far too complex. I want this to be simple.

Most of these sessions take around 30 mins. I normally run cold but I prefer to run in the evenings when I feel 'naturally' warmed up. I just keep my pace in check for 5 or so minutes. I do cool down afterwards and then stretch so let's say this all done in 45 minutes. You, I guess, would be expected to run at any time of the day so you will need variety and be sensible about running with cold muscles.

I normally try to do 3 sessions a week, 4 if I'm feeling strong. A day's rest is good but back to back days are fine if you feel up to it. I get tired from running in a way that it totally different to other training so bear that in mind.

I'm lucky to have a few challenging hills and a mixture of pavement and open land/trails around me for mixing things up. Run outside, not on a treadmill. Unless specified mix the ground up so you are taking in some ascents/descents. Hopefully this is possible. I think running on a track (note 'running' not 'sprinting') is brain numbing but that's just me. For your benchmark runs you'll need to measure out some routes. Variety is important. Don't run the same course every time you go out. You'll stuff yourself with boredom and also the memory of how you feel at certain points of a run. Get to the phonebox, look at watch, "hell I'm 30 seconds down and feel dreadful". It doesn't matter. Keep going. Every time you do a benchmark your aim is to beat your previous time

Get some proper running shoes. Asics for instance. Not those things that look like gloves that everyone laps up on the Xfit boards.

4 months is plenty time. We can get you running comfortably in 6-7 weeks. You may even grow to like it!

Here are 20 sessions to get you started.

20 Sessions

1. 15 minute run. This can be a jog. Get out. Don't stop. 15 minutes that's it. Go home. No more jogging after this.

2. 1 min on, 1 min off, 30 minutes. You will run hard for a minute. Recover by walking for a minute. This will give you 15 minutes of work, 15 minutes of recovery. The pace should be around your 400 metre mark but really this about perceived exertion. I use a lot of these intervals. The aim is to push as hard as you can but never so hard that you get crushed and can't finish the whole session. If you don't feel great after a recovery drop your pace down a little for the next interval. BUT DON'T STOP!

3. 3 x 7 minutes, 3 minute recoveries. Obviously this will be slower than Run 2. This is a tough one so early on.

4. Benchmark A. For me this run is about 2 miles long. The first 5 minutes are a steep climb, then followed by about 4 minutes fairly flat ground, 2 minutes very fast descent and then two to three minutes of flat running to finish. For the first time aim to do this in about 17-18 minutes ie pace yourself heavily. If you don't have any hills and are just running 2 miles flat then make that 15-16 minutes. Record your time.

5. 2 mins on. 1 min off, 30 minutes. 20 minutes work, 10 minutes recovery.

6. 20 minutes - flat ground. Just a simple 20 minute run at a comfortable pace. At 20 minutes stop and walk home.

7. Benchmark A. Go for it this time and beat your score.

8. Benchmark B. Mine is a 5 minute climb, 15 minutes flat, 4-5 minute fast descent. I reckon it's about 3.9 miles. Time and record.

9. 5 mins on, 1 off, 30 mins. 25 minutes work. 5 minutes walk recovery. This hurts. Intervals 3 and 4 will be challenging.

10. 20 minutes at an even pace over mixed ground. A bit more fizz than on run 6 and mix the ground up a little so you're not just running flat. 20 minutes done, go home.

11. Benchmark C. This should be about 3 miles. 5 minutes on the flat, 5 minute gradual climb. 7 minutes flat. 4 minute descent. Make the last 15-16 minutes fast. Time and record.

12. 12.5 mins on, 3 mins off x 2. 25 minutes work, 6 minutes recovery. Don't overcook it.

13. Benchmark A. Beat your score.

14. 3 x 10 mins, 2 mins recovery. 30 minutes work. 6 minutes recovery. You should be feeling pretty strong on these and reluctant to stop at 10 minutes each time.

15. 25 minutes, mixed ground/mixed pace. Get a hill in there, push your speed right up, drop back down to a plod. No walking. 25 minutes done, go home.

16. 3 mins on, 1 min off, 40 mins. 30 minutes work, 10 minutes recovery.

17. Benchmark B. Time and record. Beat your score.

18. Benchmark A. Beat your score.

19. 30 minutes. Wherever your feet take you.

20. 15 mins on, 3 mins off x 2. Push out on these intervals.


The Benchmark runs are a little hard to convey from where I actually run them but if you stick to the suggested mileage that should be fine. If you can get some hills in then that is fantastic. Your selection of route does not need to be too scientific. An obvious tip is take a course that takes you 'out and in' ie away from home and then finishes on the way back or, better still, on your doorstep.

Remember you are running to pass a test, be prepared for training not to run a competitive event. I think this method will work well for that. Later you should run with some other people just to get used to working off someone else's pace and as MOD suggests the experience of a surge.

We can then build on the first 20 sessions.

This may all seem really easy but please do only what is prescribed. I go back to Run 1 even now if I have been off for a while through injury or other commitments.

Allen Yeh
04-20-2007, 04:42 AM
Wow, thanks a lot James. That is some great information and don't worry I don't think that stuff looks too easy. Just reading your 10-20 list fills me with a bit of dread.

For your benchmarks, you do run the same course right? Sounds silly but above you talked about measuring benchmarks and the sentence right after that you said don't run the same route all the time?

I'm definitely going to print this all out, how do I reconcile this with other training? Do you typically just have a run day and then another day? Or do you often do these on the same days?

Thanks a lot again, workout 1 to be done later today, so for this don't worry about a fast pace right?

Allen Yeh
04-20-2007, 04:49 AM
Shoes.

I used to wear Asics+inserts for people with flat feet they are almost a pound each. After reading a lot about training the feet I now wear Nike Free's and haven't had a problem BUT this is mostly sprints or 1-2 miles.

Would/should I go back to the Motion Control/stabilty type of shoes? Or should I get a quality running shoe of another type. I just felt like those Asics+inserts became like a crutch and I wasn't really doing anything to address the problem just remedy the symptoms.

Josh Whiting
04-20-2007, 04:51 AM
I think that is good advice. 3 on/2 off was always one of my favorite sessions to get my running fitness up

I would make the flat efforts longer, even if that means running 3 min, walking 1. You shouldn't underestimate how much benefit you will get from time spent on your feet.

I would keep you strength training at maintenance levels and concentrate on METCON. I certainly wouldn't be pushing too hard on Deads and Squats while you bring your running up.

Josh Whiting
04-20-2007, 04:54 AM
I tend to wear Asics, but a lighter racer/trainer - like the Gel DS Trainer. You probably the only one who can answer this as it will depend on your running style and foot strike. My instinct is to go for "proper" running shoe.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 04:55 AM
The Benchmarks are always the same although A is different from B which is different from C.

Bad writing on my part: other than the Benchmarks, mix it up because familiarity breeds contempt, you'll get bored, psyched out etc.

In a good week I would aim to lift weights 3 times, maybe do a couple of short circuits with a medicine ball (12 minutes) if lucky, and run 3 times. This off the back of a couple days off. So I would normally have to run and then lift afterwards.

You're not going to become the best deadlifter in the world doing this. I'm strong but I reckon most people on the boards would cane me. But if we were to run distance, do some sprints, do some metcon, lift some shit, cycle somewhere etc. I'd be pretty good across the board.

I've not been running a lot this year and mostly lifting and I've put on weight, this doesn't normally happen. Greg and Robb's observations are spot on. Something has to give. I guess you have to weigh up your priorities aside from the 5 easy miles.

Run 1 is a slow jog out. You build from here. The intervals are fast. The Benchmarks are fast. The runs when you go for a set time are paced to keep running for that particular time.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 05:03 AM
Go for a shoe with good cushioning. I have a pair of Asics racers I use for, well racing, and for fast, short runs but they f#ck my knees if I do anything too long. As do my trail shoes (Salomons) if worn on the road.

When it comes to insoles, get a podiatrist to check you out so that they are done properly.

My girlfriend wears Nike Frees and says they're great. They scare the shit out of me because they look like carpet slippers.

But, as Josh says, go with your feeling. Bodyweight, force of footstrike etc. all varies. Just don't run in Chuck Taylors (always known as Converse All Stars in the UK).

Incidentally my best friend was very, very fast at school and out on the track could beat people in spikes while wearing CTs.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 05:07 AM
Josh,

It's a building process. But ultimately yes, time on your feet is vital.

I don't think you need to run 15 miles regularly to race over 15 miles but I don't think 100 metre sprints are the way to train for it either.

The distances/times spent running do build.

Josh Whiting
04-20-2007, 05:10 AM
What areas do run in James? I'm lucky as I'm in leafy SE London!

Allen Yeh
04-20-2007, 05:38 AM
Go for a shoe with good cushioning. I have a pair of Asics racers I use for, well racing, and for fast, short runs but they f#ck my knees if I do anything too long. As do my trail shoes (Salomons) if worn on the road.

When it comes to insoles, get a podiatrist to check you out so that they are done properly.

My girlfriend wears Nike Frees and says they're great. They scare the shit out of me because they look like carpet slippers.

But, as Josh says, go with your feeling. Bodyweight, force of footstrike etc. all varies. Just don't run in Chuck Taylors (always known as Converse All Stars in the UK).

Incidentally my best friend was very, very fast at school and out on the track could beat people in spikes while wearing CTs.

I currently don't wear any inserts in any of my shoes any more. I kind of didn't like the thought that I was just fixing the immediate problem of overpronation without addressing the "how I ran" problem.

I will go to a running store to get checked out though.

Does your girlfriend run in her Free's all the time?

James Evans
04-20-2007, 06:47 AM
I currently don't wear any inserts in any of my shoes any more. I kind of didn't like the thought that I was just fixing the immediate problem of overpronation without addressing the "how I ran" problem.

I will go to a running store to get checked out though.

Does your girlfriend run in her Free's all the time?

Yes she does. I think she has run marathons and triathlons in them.

She's a physio and she knows best....I bow to her opinion.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 06:58 AM
What areas do run in James? I'm lucky as I'm in leafy SE London!

I live in Wimbledon at the foot of the hill that leads up to Wimbledon Common. Stiff climb and I'm on the Common in between 7 and 15 minutes depending which way I go. Then a further 3 miles on to Richmond Park.

Loads of quiet backstreets with challenging hills and I run them a lot at night. Do a lot of running on the Common and I run with my girlfriend in Richmond Park, Bushy Park, Windsor Great Park and along the Thames near Twickenham & Richmond (some of those involve car journeys).

I work in the City by Liverpool Street and run back to Waterloo about 4 evenings a week. Sometimes I stretch this out as far as Vauxhall or even Battersea Park to use the pull up and dip bars (although apparently only munchkins are aloud to do chins in London these days as all the bars have been dropped in height). I can do my work to Waterloo with a rucksack in 18 minutes which beats the Tube in the summer.

Derek Simonds
04-20-2007, 08:20 AM
Great info James. I am beginning my build for an olympic distance triathlon in September.

For me running distance isn't overly taxing on my aerobic system it is hell on my tendons and ligaments. I have to build up to longer distances if I don't want to be in pain the day after the run. I ran 4 miles with my sister last weekend and it took 4 days to recover.

Allen the best advice I can give you is to go to a running store and have them help you with fitting. Doing that changed my comfort level completely. If they know what they are doing they will check you for over / under pronation and reccomend a shoe accordingly.

I weigh right at 190 and I agree with James whatever you do for training I would stay away from a light weight trainer or racing flat. My personal favorite is the asics cirrus gel. It is a nuetral shoe with good cushioning. I have 3 pairs. the other goofy thing is that I use these laces that are like bungy cords and I just slip my feet in and it adjusts the pressure accordingly. I think they are called lace locks. With laces I get hot spots on longer runs.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 08:29 AM
One thing I forgot to mention, when factoring in weights work is that motherf@cking squats day doesn't go.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 08:36 AM
Derek,

I've raced off the back of my programme from 5km road through to 10 miles off road (www.hellrunner.co.uk/).

It's good for getting you ready to prepare for racing if you follow my drift. I think we can get Allen to his goal without much effort but I would tinker and refine for race training.

I would also run more shorter time trials and races just to get used to running with others.

Some of the iron boys may laugh but I'd recommend short races if anything just be used to how rough it can get out there at the start, all those pointy knees and elbows coming at you from the skinny little mothers.

Allen Yeh
04-20-2007, 08:49 AM
Thanks a lot for all the contributions and information. I appreciate it.

In regards to the shoe thing, for right now I'm going to try to stick with my Free's and see how that treats me, if I start feeling it too much I will consider getting some other shoes at that point. I just don't want to rush into buying a pair because I know to get a decent pair it's around $100 (the last Asics I got were $110).

If I run 3 times a week, 2-3 other workouts per week also? perhaps 2 metcons and 1 day of mostly prehab/mobility type stuff? I guess I need to start running and see how the other stuff falls in since recovery for me has always been an issue.

James Evans
04-20-2007, 08:58 AM
In regards to the shoe thing, for right now I'm going to try to stick with my Free's and see how that treats me, if I start feeling it too much I will consider getting some other shoes at that point. I just don't want to rush into buying a pair because I know to get a decent pair it's around $100 (the last Asics I got were $110).



$100! They set me back close to £100. $2 to £1 at the mo...

Have a go at 3 runs, 2 metcon type workouts and some recovery/prehab/rehab stuff. Maybe one metcon, one strength session. Strength doesn't have to be balls to the wall ME does it? Will you be subject to strength tests like push ups and pull ups? I guess pull ups are more a Navy/Marine thing.

Dave Van Skike
04-20-2007, 09:07 AM
Not sure that anyone agreed with me on the other thread so I'll pose this as a question for James/running people et al...

Do you think there is benefit for those starting out with a sharp jump in their running goal (like Allen going from sprints and what not to a solid 5 miles tempo runs) to concentrating on fixing form issues at the start?

I am not a runner. I have not "run" for "running" sake for about 15 years. I have done a good deal of experience training in other endurance events.

If someone came to me and asked "how to I train for a 1 hour criterium or a 10k time trial?" The first thing I would do is check their position and understand their natural cadence to correct form issues.

In my mind Cycling requires far less kinesthetic awareness than running but form is still hyper critical for efficient fast cycling. It's not that you can't gut it out..... but being able to hammer without good form leaves you mid pack at best.

Now I know that this is the case in cycling but am I way off base when it comes to running? Do form, cadence and gate not really make that big a difference?

Allen Yeh
04-20-2007, 09:20 AM
Now I know that this is the case in cycling but am I way off base when it comes to running? Do form, cadence and gate not really make that big a difference?

I'm pretty sure on the other thread I agreed with you that form is huge. It made a huge difference for me by adjusting the way I ran it didn't magically make it easier or anything but the results of barely ever getting shin splints spoke volumes to me. It used to be that I just thought I was just going to get shin splints no matter how much I ran. Now I know differently.

Josh Whiting
04-20-2007, 09:34 AM
I think it depends on the individual. Lots of people have fairly good technique naturally (especially if they are not overweight). I think concentrating on relaxing, been up on your toes and falling forward are worthwhile. I'm not sure you need to put tons of work into this though - it's really just running how your body is designed to after all. Like I said I think the whole thing goes out the window if you're wearing boots and carrying weights.

Dave I wonder whether technical improvements cause greater efficiency in running or cycling? My instinct is that getting as close to a perfect circle in your cycling stroke will cause a massive increase in speed - however I don't cycle so this may be rubbish.

So I think POSE/CHI/running well are valuable if used in conjunction with running training. I don't think it's enough (in Allen's case) on it's own. And like I said add webbing, pack, rifle and a helmet and try to run POSE and it's just not happening for the majority of people.

Dave Van Skike
04-20-2007, 09:46 AM
I think it depends on the individual. Lots of people have fairly good technique naturally (especially if they are not overweight). I think concentrating on relaxing, been up on your toes and falling forward are worthwhile. I'm not sure you need to put tons of work into this though - it's really just running how your body is designed to after all. Like I said I think the whole thing goes out the window if you're wearing boots and carrying weights.

Dave I wonder whether technical improvements cause greater efficiency in running or cycling? My instinct is that getting as close to a perfect circle in your cycling stroke will cause a massive increase in speed - however I don't cycle so this may be rubbish.

So I think POSE/CHI/running well are valuable if used in conjunction with running training. I don't think it's enough (in Allen's case) on it's own. And like I said add webbing, pack, rifle and a helmet and try to run POSE and it's just not happening for the majority of people.

It's intersting but I think the whole pedal in circles thing is overrated. Real fast efficent pedaling (on the road) has more to do with being able to quickly contract and relax the pedaling muscles-meaning---
a fluid but powerful stroke with a definte power pulse.

Mountain biking is fairly different, where a powerful stroke at max speed may cause you to break traction----traction equals speed, wheelspin equals stop.

That's one of the reason you find that elite mountain bikers have a fairly smooth pedal stroke but may not produce the same max wattage as a track cyclist who rides in an environement of optimum traction. Massive increases in speed over the short distance (other than a flat out sprint) usually don't result from just form, but good form will allow you to maintain speed in truly huge way.

This is part experience and part bias. As a semi-hammerhead, I have realized that all speed, all strength all performance really comes from technical mastery.....strengh is a technical skill, speed is a technical skill, endurance is a technical skill. etc...

With running, maybe we're talking about the same thing. your form needs to be good enough to relax every part of your body that is not directly assisting the movement- quiet upper body, minimmal tension to maintain a solid core, "springy" legs, loose ankles etc.

Josh Whiting
04-20-2007, 10:04 AM
With running, maybe we're talking about the same thing. your form needs to be good enough to relax every part of your body that is not directly assisting the movement- quiet upper body, minimimal tension to maintain a solid core, "springy" legs, loose ankles etc.

I couldn't agree more with this and I think it is what makes tempo running so effective, learning to stay relaxed while you are exerting yourself. The relaxing part can quite easily go out the window when you are pushing things at 100%.

JW Luckett
04-21-2007, 07:29 AM
James,

Thanks for the program. I was this close to giving up running entirely. Absolutley loathe it. But at the same time I have this weird desire to be good at it, perhaps to even like it a bit, if that's not asking too much.

I like the layout of this program, and we finally had a fairly warm, sunny day after too many months of snow and cold, so I changed my mind. I will give these 20 sessions a fair and honest shot. If it doesn't work out, I am finished with running anything other than sprints for the rest of my life, so let that be on your conscience.

Today I jogged 15 minutes according to the Intellectual Property of James Evans, Super Generous Guy (SGG). Twasn't too bad.

-jw

Allen Yeh
04-22-2007, 07:17 AM
So I went before the board this weekend and I feel pretty confident about it. I didn't hear anything I didn't already know in terms of schedule. I won't hear anythign about my commision for 3-4 months and I can go to training as early as Oct' 07 that's about 6 months from now.

James,

If one hasn't been running very consistently right now would it be fine to kind of stay in the 1-3 for the first 2 weeks?

Thanks for everyone's input it's been very helpful I was somewhat panicked at first when I read about an "easy 5 miles" and I feel a lot better about it now.

James Evans
04-23-2007, 09:29 AM
Fallen behind bit over the weekend and been in court all day.

Allen,

Listen to your body. Don't overdo things but at the same time don't overestimate your own ability. Sometimes I'm absolutely trashed and have to stop after 10 minutes. Other times I'm just being lazy.

But I would keep the frequency down at first. The whole point of this is graduation.

JW,

Good luck. I could post some guff about deadlifting 600lbs but it would be an outright lie or theft from somewhere else. I wrote this programme for myself and have followed it through 3-4 times (sometimes after long periods of heavy workload I just go back to the start again so I don't go out and wreck myself running). This has worked for me. But it is my programme pretty much exactly save that you can't replicate my benchmark runs and I would say that some room for experimentation is totally viable.

Dave,

Just read your post before I left for the weekend on Friday and gave it a lot of thought on the train.

I would like to say 'no' running should be the most natural thing, look at children. I guess that's the romantic answer. Sadly, I see people out and about with the weirdest technique (I have to say a lot of woman run badly - the weak abductor/adducter argument? Can't remember which and just plain damn sloppy running). So yes, some work with a proper coach is going to be beneficial to anyone just as seeing a proper swimming coach will work wonders and being taught to ride a bike efficiently is going to make you a better riders.

On the subject of bikes, loads of people I see need to be sorted out, mainly for their set up which is appalling (seat too low, handlebars wrong etc.) or overgearing.

Sorry, rushing this.

Allen Yeh
05-02-2007, 11:39 AM
Good news:
400m PR of 1:29 my best before this was 1:31 a while ago.

Bad news:
I really want to get started on this program but I keep getting so discouraged whenever I go out and am unable to complete 15 minutes straight. I feel like I'm just unable to govern my pace when I'm running on the road. Previous to the past few weeks I'd been doing all my running on a treadmill. I'm possibly going to invest into a pedometer or something to kind of give me a general idea of how fast I am going.

James Evans
05-02-2007, 12:26 PM
Allen, just reel yourself in. I know that's hard but you want to be taking the opposite of the CrossFit 'wham bam thank you mam' approach. I don't want you to walk but if you have to shuffle like an 80 year old so be it.

You'll get your pace up on the intervals.

JW Luckett
05-02-2007, 04:58 PM
Allen,

You could try using a metronome. I sometimes use a little digital one my kids don't need anymore. It goes beep beep.

Decide your tempo and then match your foot strikes to the beep. Actually pretty hard to do, especially on variable terrain, so I usually just get the tempo set in my head before I start.

-jw

Allen Yeh
05-03-2007, 02:56 AM
I don't want you to walk but if you have to shuffle like an 80 year old so be it.


That's what I was afraid you'd say. I've been really focusing on my running form (POSE type /non heel first running) and I noticed whenever I'd go slower it was harder to keep that form and it devolved into the shuffle method.

Josh Whiting
05-03-2007, 03:57 AM
Allen,

You need to stop trying to force results. All you need to do is go out and get the miles in while not stressing about how fast you are going. I promise you before you know it you'll be thinking "I'm actually quite enjoying this" and covering the ground at a good pace.

James Evans
05-10-2007, 07:16 AM
Allen, how are you getting on?

Allen Yeh
05-10-2007, 07:30 AM
Sorry, I forget to post my progress in this thread, typically I'll throw my stuff in my log.

I had a 2 mile run for the PT test on Sunday, had an asthma attack during, ran out of inhaler stuff, suffice to say my time was less than stellar at 19:01.

Did workout 1 on Tuesday - I actually managed to keep my pace down enough to finish 15:00 straight without walking at all other than jogging in place at the occasional stoplight (my running progress would be nil if a car were to collide with me...just an assumption.) My total distance in the 15:00 was 2.95 km's.

I'm supposed to do workout #2 today or tomorrow, debating on a rest day today, the arches of my feet are pretty sore.

James Evans
05-11-2007, 06:18 AM
I'll start reading your log.

Grit your teeth. You'll get there.

How did you cope with the 5km and 10km runs that CrossFit throws into the mix? Was that just hellday for you?

Oh, and this may be satisfying for you. I'm not enjoying my running much myself at the moment. I've put about 5-6kg on this year (and not all lean muscle either) and I can really feel it. Knees and ankles really ache afterwards. I realise that as I no longer play rugby I don't need to carry that kind of weight.

Allen Yeh
05-11-2007, 06:53 AM
How did you cope with the 5km and 10km runs that CrossFit throws into the mix? Was that just hellday for you?


I'm not following the WOD's, I'm doing my own thing in terms of lifting and following your running template too.

James Evans
05-11-2007, 06:59 AM
But you used to didn't you?

I was interested how you did back in your CrossFit orientated days.

Or am I wide of the mark?

Allen Yeh
05-11-2007, 07:03 AM
But you used to didn't you?

I was interested how you did back in your CrossFit orientated days.

Or am I wide of the mark?

Ohhh....well um I'm embarressed to say I'd do the 5K's and I'd typically end up in the 24-28 minute mark and I would conveniently be too busy to workout on the 10K days and I'd rationalize to myself I'd be better off doing the metcon than trying to make the 10K up on some other day.

Running was a weakness so I'd uh avoid it as much as possible.

James Evans
05-11-2007, 07:30 AM
Ok, good honest answer.

I was wondering if you had been doing the 10ks and now found it hard to get running.

Nothing wrong with 24-28 minutes for 5k. I doubt many sub 18 min guys could handle the weight that you probably do. Something has to give. But what we're trying to do is pull you into the middle of the pack.

I notice a lot of people sub in for the longer runs. That seems to defeat the object to me. Work on your weaknesses etc.

Allen Yeh
05-11-2007, 07:43 AM
Work on your weaknesses etc.

Exactly and years later I am actually doing that! heh

Allen Yeh
05-17-2007, 05:49 AM
5/6 - Run 4 - Benchmark A - 2 miles - 19:00

5/9 - Run 1 - 15 minutes - Distance 2.9 km's ~1.78 miles

5/14 - Run 2 - 1 min on, 1 min off, 30 minutes.
-Total distance 4.87 km ~= 3.03 miles
-Total distance run ~2.25 miles
-Total distance walked ~0.75 miles

5/16 - Run 3 - 7 minutes on/3 minutes off repeat twice:
Interval 1 - 0.92 miles, speed ~7:36.5/mile
Interval 2 - 0.9 miles, speed ~7:46.6/mile
Interval 3 - 0.79 miles , speed ~8:51.6/mile

James Evans
05-17-2007, 06:25 AM
Good stuff Allen. How do you feel it's going?

It states the obvious but look at the extra work achieved in R2 over R1 when you are in fact using the same work time of 15 minutes.

I love intervals. They always feel (in advance) that you are cheating but when you break the session down you see you have worked much harder that in that steady state, no stop run.

By the way, this may cheer you up but my running is dreadful at the moment. Ground out a session I normally find a breeze last night. Felt like a death march.

Allen Yeh
05-17-2007, 07:12 AM
I feel like it's going well.

Run 3 - the last interval was terrible it was all I could do to keep my feet moving.

Thanks again for the program!

James Evans
05-17-2007, 07:22 AM
The 3x7 mins is a shocker isn't it? You're upping your mile time considerably because you've got a rest ahead of you and then suddenly it's interval 3 and you've got nowhere to hide.

Allen Yeh
05-23-2007, 03:13 AM
5/22 - Run 4 - Benchmark A- 2 miles @~15:30 which on paper it looks like I've improved 3:30 from my last 2 mile on 5/6 but really it was a completely different route and I didn't have an asthma attack this time either. I have a 2 mile test again on 6/2 so that will be a better comparison against this effort.

Josh Whiting
05-23-2007, 04:35 AM
Allen,

It seems though that your making progress. Your creeping down towards the 7 min mile mark. Are you enjoying it yet?

Allen Yeh
05-23-2007, 04:44 AM
Allen,

It seems though that your making progress. Your creeping down towards the 7 min mile mark. Are you enjoying it yet?

Enjoying is a bit strong but I'm not loathing it as much as I used to though.

Allen Yeh
05-24-2007, 05:24 AM
5/23 - Run #5 - 2 minute on/ 1 minute off, 30 minutes total
Total Distance - 3 miles
Total run distance ~2.5 miles
Total walk distance ~0.5 miles

This seemed harder than it should have been, I was unable to get my speed up on the intervals, so total distance during the runs was only 2.5 miles in 20 minutes of work.

Derek Simonds
05-24-2007, 05:39 AM
Run Allen Run. Nice job on the intervals.

James Evans
05-24-2007, 05:50 AM
How did you feel during the rest periods Allen? Were you sucking in?

I'm afraid most of this is going to be unpleasant but you may have just been out of sorts when you did it. I have days when I fly and days when I wonder if I will ever run again (mostly the latter the last couple of weeks).

Allen Yeh
05-24-2007, 06:04 AM
How did you feel during the rest periods Allen? Were you sucking in?

I'm afraid most of this is going to be unpleasant but you may have just been out of sorts when you did it. I have days when I fly and days when I wonder if I will ever run again (mostly the latter the last couple of weeks).

#5(2/1) was nowhere near the intensity I had during #3(1/1), I was thinking I really need to pick this pace up...then I thought I was going faster but in the end...not really. My legs really did feel like lead yesterday though.

My total run distance in 3 was ~2.25 with 15 minutes of work. My total run for 5 was ~2.5 with 20 minutes of work.

I'm definitely NOT running today as for me 3 days in a row would be too much, that and the arches of my feet are not happy with me. I might do a few strides on Friday and I'll do Run #6 on Sat/Sun.

James Evans
05-24-2007, 06:23 AM
Don't run at all tomorrow.

Allen Yeh
05-24-2007, 06:36 AM
Don't run at all tomorrow.

You don't have to tell me twice!

Any advice for arch pain? I've been rolling the bottoms of my feet with a tennis ball at my desk at work.

James Evans
05-24-2007, 06:48 AM
I meant not even strides tomorrow.

Step away from the running.

I can't help you with the arches I'm afraid.

James Evans
05-24-2007, 06:52 AM
Have a look at this:

http://www.foot.com/info/cond_arch_pain.jsp

I just googled arch pain as I know very little about it. Could be a site of interest.

James Evans
05-24-2007, 06:52 AM
And stop wearing those high heels.

Allen Yeh
05-24-2007, 06:53 AM
I meant not even strides tomorrow.

Step away from the running.

I can't help you with the arches I'm afraid.

Yep, I got that part. Right now my plan is to go in the gym to get a strength session in maybe some foot mobility drills and then not even go near a track.

James Evans
05-25-2007, 02:55 AM
We cross-posted Allen. I put a link up for you re your arches but looking it over it's probably no help.

Allen Yeh
05-25-2007, 03:26 AM
And stop wearing those high heels.

But they make my legs look so good...I mean uh....

James Evans
05-25-2007, 03:50 AM
Krista posted this over on Stumptuous:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/graphic/2007/05/07/GR2007050700484.html

http://english.people.com.cn/200607/10/images/heel2.jpg

Allen Yeh
05-25-2007, 03:59 AM
That pic is an easy way to an easy ankle sprain. Geez!


This little piece has a few good things, I totally forgot about the towel thing.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/07/AR2007050700914.html

This one I'm somewhat iffy on, some of the "bad" things they said is due more to having weak/bad feet than the shoes themselves.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/health/interactives/shoes.html

James Evans
05-25-2007, 04:08 AM
Cressey recommends ballet shoes in his article on deadlifting over at T-Nation. Kind of.

I was really wound up the other day when I read some comments by a guy who was barely 18 as he recommended that a woman getting into running should go and buy either track spikes or cross country spikes and then run without the actual spikes attached.

Apparently that was all the cushioning that she needed and those fancy sneakers from Nike and the like were just a rip off.

Big difference between proper running shoes and fashion sneakers.

Jeff Northrop
05-25-2007, 06:19 AM
For both lifting and running I use Puma H Streets. These shoes have virtually no cushioning or support -- it's basically a lace up sock with a thin rubber sole. I love them. I switched from a traditional running shoe to these when I switched to a forefoot running style. I'll never go back, never. My feet are stronger and I'm running injury-free.

For the issue with the bottom of your foot: Try some SMR on the front and outside of your lower leg. I had a similar pain. I found lots of knots there from all my running. Once I released them the pain went away. Could have been a coincidence but it couldn't hurt either.

James Evans
05-25-2007, 06:40 AM
Ultimately it's a personal choice thing Jeff.

I myself believe strongly in decent cushioning. I run a lot on tarmac and really notice the difference between my normal running shoes, my race shoes (lightweight, limited cushioning) and my trail shoes (very limited cushioning).

The trail shoes really bang me up these days but after using Salomons for several years I'm going to try out Inov 8 shoes. I also often run under a load so I want extra cushioning.

Did you run the marathon in the Pumas?

Jeff Northrop
05-25-2007, 07:23 AM
Ultimately it's a personal choice thing Jeff.

Of course! I'm no expert so I can only relate my personal experience and believe me I understand just because it works for me doesn't mean it'll work for everyone. On top of that I make the wrong choice for myself more often than not.

I didn't run the marathon in the Puma's. I only had the courage to make the switch once I cleared that personal hurdle. I have done a couple of 10+ mile runs in them though, but that's it so far. However, prior to the switch, I was never able to run consistently without injury (ITB most often), so for me they've been a huge help.

Edit: I do strongly suggest the SMR for the lower leg though :)

Edit again: I meant to say that 10+ miles are the furthest I've run in these shoes. I do run 3x/week in them. Currently 3x1600m intervals, 5 miles tempo run and a 7-10 long run each week.

JW Luckett
05-26-2007, 07:42 AM
James,

What trail shoes do you use that are so light and uncushiony?

jw

James Evans
05-29-2007, 05:36 AM
James,

What trail shoes do you use that are so light and uncushiony?

jw

Salomon XA Pro 3Ds. My original XA Pros were much more cushioned and I still wear these for day to day walking around. I'm on my third pair of 3Ds now. They're lighter and a bit more stripped back in the sole. From the pictures they put up I notice quite a few of the Gym Jones guys wear them.

+s Light, drain/dry quickly when wet (I wouldn't bother with the Gore-Tex version), good lacing system, good support, pretty hard wearing

-s The sole could be more aggressive. Not so great on harder ground.

I've read mixed things about them but I like them a lot and have favoured them over walking boots too when trekking. However, I've heard nothing but rave reviews about Inov 8 so I'm interested in trying them.

Allen Yeh
05-29-2007, 10:59 AM
5/29 - Run #2 revisited - 1:00 on/1:00 off -
Total distance - 3.02 miles??
Total running distance - 2.27 miles??
Total walking distance - 0.75 miles??

So 2 weeks later I end up with the exact same time, BUT I really think I need to recalibrate the Nike+ sensor, at what I am almost positive is a 0.75 mile mark, the sensor told me it was at 0.62 miles. However this isn't a bad thing since I'm actually running more than what the thing is measuring. The thing that changed between now and then is that I bought a new thing to hold the sensor and my 2nd attempt was on flat ground while my first attempt it was a very hilly run.

James Evans
05-30-2007, 03:33 AM
5/29 - Run #2 revisited - 1:00 on/1:00 off -
Total distance - 3.02 miles??
Total running distance - 2.27 miles??
Total walking distance - 0.75 miles??

So 2 weeks later I end up with the exact same time, BUT I really think I need to recalibrate the Nike+ sensor, at what I am almost positive is a 0.75 mile mark, the sensor told me it was at 0.62 miles. However this isn't a bad thing since I'm actually running more than what the thing is measuring. The thing that changed between now and then is that I bought a new thing to hold the sensor and my 2nd attempt was on flat ground while my first attempt it was a very hilly run.

I wouldn't worry about the distance covered so much. I know that is the ultimate aim here but you can measure your progress later. The point is to get you running on a regular basis. If you feel like you've given it all you've got after the intervals then that's what I want. When you do the unbroken runs, these should be easier.

If you can afford it, buy a Garmin Forerunner. They are very accurate.

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=142

Allen Yeh
05-30-2007, 03:44 AM
If you can afford it, buy a Garmin Forerunner. They are very accurate.

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=142

No no, my wife would kill me! I'll have to settle for my $30 nike+ thing.

Allen Yeh
06-04-2007, 04:06 AM
June 2, 2007

2 mile PT test - 15:56 Not the best pace BUT after 2 miles I felt like I could keep on going for at least another 1-2 miles! The only 2 400m paces that I liked were there first 400m's and the last 400m's of 1:45 and 1:47 the other 400m's were all ~2:00. Thanks James!

Allen Yeh
06-04-2007, 04:14 AM
I found out that I wouldn't be leaving for Officer Basic until at earliest Feb-April 2008. What would be the best recommendation to keep at this but avoid hurting myself? i.e. foot/knee pain seems to be a weekly occurence now.

Option 1:
Keep at the program 3x a week and then ramp it down to 2x a week and perhaps ramp it back up when the date comes closer, ~Dec 2007/Jan 2008.

Option 2: Follow the program but ramp it down to 2x a week and 1x a week of sprints under 100m's.

Option 3: Stop running and pick it back up later (which I don't want to do but I couldn't think of anything else for option 3)

I know I need to run weekly to maintain my ability to run as when I don't run for even a few weeks it's noticable how much harder it is.

Allen Yeh
06-06-2007, 03:35 AM
Anyone?

Jeff Northrop
06-06-2007, 05:01 AM
In my opinion, if you are experiencing pain, then stop. You could trying running once a week and see if that reduces your volume enough to allow things to heal, but if it doesn't take a couple of weeks off, then try again. Once a week might suffice to maintain your current running level but you'd have to bring some intensity to that once a week. Twice a week with a reduced intensity my suit you (and your injury) better and still keep what you've gained.

Also, it might be a good time to reevaluate your running gait to see if you can improve something so you don't reinjure yourself.

Josh Whiting
06-06-2007, 07:05 AM
I would reduce the volume of running, down to maybe 2 times a week, perhaps reduce the volume and up the intensity. Then add a longer run every so often, say every 3-4 weeks. Be sure to throw in slightly longer intervals (3-6 minutes) every so often, running and rowing.

Maybe initially take 10 days off running so you are starting from a fresh sheet running wise.

Matt Cricchio
06-06-2007, 05:51 PM
Hey guys. Long time lurker first time poster.

I have started using James' plan to prepare myself for BUD/s. I'm used to running intervals at regularly and I have been doing 4 sessions of the plan a week. I'm going to be through the 20 sessions in a couple of weeks.

James, what would you do next? I do not know as much about running as I do other things and I just wanted to see where you were heading with this so I could get some ideas.

James Evans
06-07-2007, 08:29 AM
I'm away from home at the moment and I've just left my job too so not looking at the boards regularly.

Allen,

I like Josh's suggestion. Don't quit running totally, you need to keep your eye or you've just been wasting your time. I would also advise you go and see a specialist and sort out your knees and feet. Running is not easy for you and I think you should ascertain if there is any reason for this.

Matt,

there is a progression to this, in fact there are about 40-45 sessions in total. I need to get my notes at home to post them. The idea was to see how Allen coped with this and then post the progressions. How have you found it so far?

Matt Cricchio
06-07-2007, 09:08 AM
Matt,

there is a progression to this, in fact there are about 40-45 sessions in total. I need to get my notes at home to post them. The idea was to see how Allen coped with this and then post the progressions. How have you found it so far?


James,

Before starting your sessions I was working on running mechanics (foot strikes, stride frequencies, etc) and doing intervals regularly. For the last ten weeks I was doing things like: 400mX6, 100mX10, 200mX8, 800m-700m-600m... all the way to 100m and back up, twice a week. I mixed in some longer runs like 3 miles at 80% of my 1 mile pace or 2 miles at 90%. I was very slow when I began and I am getting much faster.

Needless to say, I am a bit more used to the plodding than Allen is (but you'll get there, especially now that you have more time before OCS!) and the only thing that has been getting to me is running in my boots.

With my future career choice I will be running, sometimes, up to 20 miles a day and always running at least 6 in one day. Lotsa volume. Iím going to have to be able to run 4 miles in boots and on soft sand in under 32 minutes. I would like to do it somewhere between 27-29 minutes.

Was your plan heading in this direction? Can you necessarily train for volume like this? I liked your progressions and I want to continue when I am done with the 20 sessions. Anything you can give me will be a big help.

Allen Yeh
06-08-2007, 05:45 AM
Thanks for the replies guys, I was also opting for the not totally stopping thing too. In regards to seeing a specialist, my own problems will just have to wait until my wife's surgery is done and she is recovered.

Haven't had any extreme injuries, just foot pain and some knee pains, my right knee did get a little swollen last week which I thought was odd.

James Evans
06-18-2007, 04:28 AM
Matt,

Not sure if I originally posted this but here's a little on the history of these progressions.

In 1999 I was running about 4 times a week off road with some serious climbs and covering between 5 and 11 miles on a run. I had finally managed to run a 15 minute climb that had always (mentally) beaten me 7 years previously when I had been at school. I was also cycling 14 miles 5 days a week, using weights in a fairly basic fashion, working outside, being active.

Then I moved back to London and started working in an office....

Coming back from a trip to Australia in 2001 I couldn't run for shit. I looked pretty fit but routes that I previously been comfortable with were just leaving me walking after ten minutes. So I decided to do something about it rather than the usual 'it's been 5 minutes, I feel like I'm about to die, running is obviously not for me'. So I mixed up runs that I was familiar with with the intervals I have suggested. As I have mentioned I think fartlek can be too undisciplined, I believe a mixture of set times and set distances are far more suitable, particularly if you make the targets manageable with a bit off effort on your part.

And for me it did the trick and got me back up within about 5 weeks, take part in races and record decent times without doing the very structured training that most distance athletes revel in and I think is just a brain mash. Now I obviously have an advantage over Allen because I spent my teens and early twenties running a lot so I have that background but I think with some personal tweaking it can work for anyone. And it is just a guideline. Adapt it as you see fit.

Furthermore, after periods of inactivity either as a result of work or illness I've gone back to it and Run 1 and started all over and it's done the trick again. I've gone through those progressions 5 or 6 time in 6 years and will probably do the same again this summer.

I think with some adjustments it can work for you although I appreciate that running in boots is a bitch. But 4 miles under 32 minutes is an obtainable target. I don't think we're looking at elite distance runner are we? A lot of this is mental as well. Knowing that you are capable, knowing that you can live with that pain and that your lungs really aren't going to burst.

I like your intervals. If you start to get stale with my stuff throw in some more intervals. I promise to post further progressions asap but here is a taster of a couple of advanced ones:

Choose a course that involves a mixture of ground, flat, short steep hill, slower gradual inclines.

Run 1 minute, walk 1 minute, run 2 minutes, walk 1 minute, run 3 minutes, walk 1 minute up to seven minutes of running then work your way back down from seven minutes to 1 minute.
Run as hard as you can for each interval. Seven minutes will never seem so long and one minute so short so the quality of the intervals will drop off and you will need to check your pace at some point. The idea is to manage a fast pace. Go hard, not balls to the wall.

This give you 56 minutes of hard work with 14 minutes of rest. You will cover far more ground than if you went and ran 56 minutes without stopping. This is a good brain bull as well.

Lamp post sprints with 9kg vest or rucksack. Jog out for minutes to warm up then for 20 minutes alternately sprint/walk between street lamps, trees etc. depending on the availability of your landmarks. For me these can be anything between 10 and 50 metres. This makes the distance and the recovery irregular. Which is a good thing. Go as hard as you can, balls to the wall. Some hills should be included if possible.

This one is hard on the knees so be careful.


Allen,

Fair enough, best wishes for your wife.

Matt Cricchio
06-19-2007, 07:33 AM
I think with some adjustments it can work for you although I appreciate that running in boots is a bitch. But 4 miles under 32 minutes is an obtainable target. I don't think we're looking at elite distance runner are we? A lot of this is mental as well. Knowing that you are capable, knowing that you can live with that pain and that your lungs really aren't going to burst.


Youíre right, we are not looking at elite distances here. Just a lot of slow trudging back and forth between chow, conditioning runs in the sand, and the weekly 4 mile timed beach run in under 32 minutes. I do want to be competitive when I arrive there and I am looking for something to give me an edge.


Choose a course that involves a mixture of ground, flat, short steep hill, slower gradual inclines.

Run 1 minute, walk 1 minute, run 2 minutes, walk 1 minute, run 3 minutes, walk 1 minute up to seven minutes of running then work your way back down from seven minutes to 1 minute.
Run as hard as you can for each interval. Seven minutes will never seem so long and one minute so short so the quality of the intervals will drop off and you will need to check your pace at some point. The idea is to manage a fast pace. Go hard, not balls to the wall.

This give you 56 minutes of hard work with 14 minutes of rest. You will cover far more ground than if you went and ran 56 minutes without stopping. This is a good brain bull as well.

Lamp post sprints with 9kg vest or rucksack. Jog out for minutes to warm up then for 20 minutes alternately sprint/walk between street lamps, trees etc. depending on the availability of your landmarks. For me these can be anything between 10 and 50 metres. This makes the distance and the recovery irregular. Which is a good thing. Go as hard as you can, balls to the wall. Some hills should be included if possible.

This one is hard on the knees so be careful.

James, these new progressions look excellent. I am very interested in seeing more of your advanced sessions. Iím deferring primarily to you on this subject and when I get my bearings I will go ahead and put sessions of my own together.

But seriously, good work. These workouts are helping me a lot.

James Evans
07-11-2007, 06:02 AM
Ok, Iíve finally got my arse in gear and here are the further progressions. As before you will need to apply some creativity to how you adapt my suggestions and remember these are suggestions. You should make these runs personal to you, your abilities and your local geography.

For reference Iíve reproduced the first 20 sessions.


20 Sessions

1. 15 minute run. This can be a jog. Get out. Don't stop. 15 minutes that's it. Go home. No more jogging after this.

2. 1 min on, 1 min off, 30 minutes. You will run hard for a minute. Recover by walking for a minute. This will give you 15 minutes of work, 15 minutes of recovery. The pace should be around your 400 metre mark but really this about perceived exertion. I use a lot of these intervals. The aim is to push as hard as you can but never so hard that you get crushed and can't finish the whole session. If you don't feel great after a recovery drop your pace down a little for the next interval. BUT DON'T STOP!

3. 3 x 7 minutes, 3 minute recoveries. Obviously this will be slower than Run 2. This is a tough one so early on.

4. Benchmark A. For me this run is about 2 miles long. The first 5 minutes are a steep climb, then followed by about 4 minutes fairly flat ground, 2 minutes very fast descent and then two to three minutes of flat running to finish. For the first time aim to do this in about 17-18 minutes ie pace yourself heavily. If you don't have any hills and are just running 2 miles flat then make that 15-16 minutes. Record your time.

5. 2 mins on. 1 min off, 30 minutes. 20 minutes work, 10 minutes recovery.

6. 20 minutes - flat ground. Just a simple 20 minute run at a comfortable pace. At 20 minutes stop and walk home.

7. Benchmark A. Go for it this time and beat your score.

8. Benchmark B. Mine is a 5 minute climb, 15 minutes flat, 4-5 minute fast descent. I reckon it's about 3.9 miles. Time and record.

9. 5 mins on, 1 off, 30 mins. 25 minutes work. 5 minutes walk recovery. This hurts. Intervals 3 and 4 will be challenging.

10. 20 minutes at an even pace over mixed ground. A bit more fizz than on run 6 and mix the ground up a little so you're not just running flat. 20 minutes done, go home.

11. Benchmark C. This should be about 3 miles. 5 minutes on the flat, 5 minute gradual climb. 7 minutes flat. 4 minute descent. Make the last 15-16 minutes fast. Time and record.

12. 12.5 mins on, 3 mins off x 2. 25 minutes work, 6 minutes recovery. Don't overcook it.

13. Benchmark A. Beat your score.

14. 3 x 10 mins, 2 mins recovery. 30 minutes work. 6 minutes recovery. You should be feeling pretty strong on these and reluctant to stop at 10 minutes each time.

15. 25 minutes, mixed ground/mixed pace. Get a hill in there, push your speed right up, drop back down to a plod. No walking. 25 minutes done, go home.

16. 3 mins on, 1 min off, 40 mins. 30 minutes work, 10 minutes recovery.

17. Benchmark B. Time and record. Beat your score.

18. Benchmark A. Beat your score.

19. 30 minutes. Wherever your feet take you.

20. 15 mins on, 3 mins off x 2. Push out on these intervals.


Sessions 21 - 35

This takes thing on a stage, a few longer runs, a chance to beat some benchmark times and some different intervals

21. Benchmark C. Record and beat your time.

22. 20 minutes, mixed ground/pace. Vary the terrain (at least one hill) and push your pace from slow jog to hard running as you feel fit.

23. 1 minute on, 30 seconds off, 30 minutes. Go hard but the 30 second walk recoveries will go in a flash.This is 20 intervals/minutes of work.

24. Benchmark B. Record and beat your time.

25. Hill training. Warm up for 5-10 minutes with easy running. I use a climb that is about 150m in length and is challenging. The hill forms part of a street grid, ie a square of roughly equal sides. Run the climb as fast as you can. Jog very slowly across the top of the square. Run back down at a steady stride. Walk the bottom of the square. Repeat for 9 reps. Cool down with 15 minutes of steady running.

26. Planned Fartlek. I have mentioned before that I think Fartlek takes a lot of discipline. Plan an interval session in your head but donít be afraid to make adjustments if your feel fried. Mine is roughly like this: 5 minutes climb at a steady pace, then back down the hill by the fastest route, then back up by the most direct (but steepest) route. Recover for a minute or two with slow jogging and then run back down the original 5 minute climb at full tilt. Then run steady for a further 5-6 minutes. Next comes about 1000m of lamp post sprints (trees or other features will do). Sprint to the first one and then jog to the second and so on. I recover for about a minute (the time it takes me to cross a railway footbridge near my house) and then put in a further sprint for 100m. 5 further minutes of steady running follow before a final hard push of 2 minutes to home. Ok, the above takes some digesting but the idea is to plan something that keeps you working at a varied intensity (and remember hills are speedwork in a different guise) for 25-35 minutes. Be creative. With many of the runs I do, home is the end point of the run so I plan routes that bring around to that point and aim to push hard to the finish. With sessions that just say Run 30 minutes I make a rough estimate of where that will take me and then aim to get to as close to home as possible before time runs out.

27. Take Bench Mark C but add a 10 minute loop to the route roughly in the middle of the run. This doesnít need to be challenging terrain.

28. 5 mins on, 1 minute off, 42 minutes.

29. Bench Mark B but vary the first 10 minutes of the run (ie change your route)

30. Benchmark A. Record and beat your time.

31. 30 minutes. Run wherever your feet take you.

32. 2 minutes on, 1 minute off, 30 minutes. Hard running.

33. Benchmark C. Record and beat your score.

34. 20 minutes on, 5 minutes off, x 2.

35. Using the template of R27, now add 10 minutes to run near the end of the route, preferably involving a nasty climb. So, your five minutes from your usual finish, run in a different direction for five minutes out and then five minute back and then continue.


Sessions 36 - 50

Some of these are nasty and I would apply some caution. Go out and run a trail and see how long you can go for, you donít to bust a gut. I would have thought that an hour of gentle running would be perfectly possible by this stage.

36. 1 minute on, 1 minute off, 1 hour. Get plenty of hills in here and run hard. This is only 30 minutes of work.

37. 1 minute on, 1 minute off, 2 minutes on, 1 minute off up to seven minutes. Then sevens minutes on, 1 minute off, back down to 1 minute of work. 56 minutes of running with 14 minutes of rest. Get some hills, push your efforts. This can be hellish.

38. Queen of the Hill. There are supposedly seven hills near my house (it looks like one to me) and I originally pinched the idea off a local running club for a method of getting relatively testing climbing work in on my mountain bike. Along a stretch of about 1.5 miles there are 10 parallel streets running up these hills and the start of nearly all my runs takes in one of these. I live about half way along the bottom with 5 mins of running taking me in either direction. Each hill takes 5 minutes to run up, less to run down. I run the five minutes to the start and then run up the first street, down the second and so on until I reach the end and then run the 5 minutes to home. This approximately 5 miles and I donít like it much. Play around with this. You could just find a steep climb, warm up and then run up and down it 5 times although that could prove rather dull.

39. 35 minute trail run. Make sure you include some climbs. Choose a circular route.

40. 35 minute trail run. Reverse the direction of R39.

41. 45 minute road/trail run. Wear a light rucksack for this one just to make things interesting. Mix the route up a bit, grass, trails, man made surfaces etc.

42. King of the Hill. This hell, an utter grind. Itís R38 run in both directions and measure on my bike is exactly 10 miles. I think 10 reps on the same hill will probably mash your brain up. Good luck.

43. 30 minutes gentle running. Use this as a recovery session.

44. Benchmark A. Record and beat your time.

45. 40 minute trail run. Get some climbs in.

46. Hill work. Find a climb that takes about 3-4 minutes to run. Climb hard, jog back down x 5.

47. Reverse the direction of your Benchmark A.

48. 45 minutes, steady running. Nothing too challenging.

49. 4 minutes on, 2 minutes off, 60 minutes.

50. 1.5 mile timed run. Go hell for leather and aim to get at least below 10 minutes. A flat course is best.

Ok, so there you are. Iím afraid a bit of planning is needed to adapt these to your own situation but the aim is to make it suitable for your individual needs and to give you some ideas to work with. I can run some of these for 5 days at a time but the later runs will need some recovery time despite increased levels of running fitness.

Matt Cricchio
07-11-2007, 11:50 AM
Excellent, James. I am thinking about posting my training log up here and hopefully getting some feedback. I restarted the template from the begining a week ago and I am hoping to work through at least the first 20 before I go to bootcamp. Seriously, thanks. I don't know anything about running.

James Evans
07-11-2007, 11:57 AM
Nor do I Matt! But best to treat it as a natural but neglected human ability rather than a developed skill.

Hope this stuff helps you.

Allen Yeh
07-12-2007, 05:34 AM
I don't want you to think I've forgotten about all the work you've put into these James!

With my wifes surgery and stuff I've been neglecting my running and I will get back on track when things settle down a bit.

James Evans
07-17-2007, 12:53 AM
Allen, it's all cool, the stuff is here when you need it.

Best wishes to your wife.

Matt Cricchio
07-20-2007, 07:32 AM
Allen, sorry for the thread hijack. But...

James when you start moving into the latter sessions at what frequency do you go at them? I'm doing about 4 a week now and I'm feeling good. I know once I get into the more intense/longer runs 4 times a week isn't going to occur very often. I really like to plan out my training weeks in advance and once it's on the paper I feel bad if I don't do it.

Two times a week? Have you still seen progress at that frequency?

Allen Yeh
07-20-2007, 08:45 AM
Allen, sorry for the thread hijack. But...

James when you start moving into the latter sessions at what frequency do you go at them? I'm doing about 4 a week now and I'm feeling good. I know once I get into the more intense/longer runs 4 times a week isn't going to occur very often. I really like to plan out my training weeks in advance and once it's on the paper I feel bad if I don't do it.

Two times a week? Have you still seen progress at that frequency?

No problem, but I haven't even been as consistent as 2x a week the last month this week was the first time I had run 2x a week + sprints x1. I'll put up if 2x a week is working out or not after another week or 2.

James Evans
07-23-2007, 06:49 AM
Allen, sorry for the thread hijack. But...

James when you start moving into the latter sessions at what frequency do you go at them? I'm doing about 4 a week now and I'm feeling good. I know once I get into the more intense/longer runs 4 times a week isn't going to occur very often. I really like to plan out my training weeks in advance and once it's on the paper I feel bad if I don't do it.

Two times a week? Have you still seen progress at that frequency?

Matt, this may seem like a cop out but I think you have to adapt the schedule to the way you are feeling. Yes, you can bang some of these runs out for 5 days at a time but others are going to leave you needing proper rest.

I think learning to listen to your body is a vital skill. There is a difference between getting home from work and feeling a bit tired and then bunking off training and coming home and collapsing into bed because you are absolutely shattered. Pre-planning your training is very sensible but you must always be flexible and adapt to stresses on your body.

Having said that, I think 2-3 sessions a week is still manageable, remembering that some of the longer runs go back to back and will need more more than 24 hours rest between them.

Is that answer suitably vague?

Matt Cricchio
07-23-2007, 04:01 PM
Matt, this may seem like a cop out but I think you have to adapt the schedule to the way you are feeling. Yes, you can bang some of these runs out for 5 days at a time but others are going to leave you needing proper rest.

I think learning to listen to your body is a vital skill. There is a difference between getting home from work and feeling a bit tired and then bunking off training and coming home and collapsing into bed because you are absolutely shattered. Pre-planning your training is very sensible but you must always be flexible and adapt to stresses on your body.

Having said that, I think 2-3 sessions a week is still manageable, remembering that some of the longer runs go back to back and will need more more than 24 hours rest between them.

Is that answer suitably vague?

I was thinking I would do only 2 of the longer runs in a week when I go to them, so, yes, that's exactly the answer I was looking for.

This is really good stuff and I'm getting up to snuff quicker than I ever imagined. Thanks, James!

Allen Yeh
01-07-2008, 09:19 AM
Update:

I am currently scheduled for a departure of the 2nd week of May of 2008 to BOLC II and then going on to BOLCIII/OBC afterwards. The only other running milestones I need to get to is a PFT in March'08 which is only a 2 mile run my time was 15:15. The first mile was 7:30 and my 2nd mile slipped back a bit.

I'd like to keep doing Oly while integrating a running plan. but I need to figure out what is the best way I can do this without going beyond my ability to recover. The last time I ran was my PFT in October '07 and since then I have solely focused on the CA WOD with only short distance running in that time.

Current plan:
This week run for time and not for distance, while following the CA WOD and adjusting fire after I see how I feel. After I get my lower body used to running again I'll start from step 1 of James Evan's running plan.

I have 8 weeks until the 2 mile run at which I'd like to be able to keep that at 14:00.

I have ~16 weeks until I leave for school at which I'd like to work up to a 7-7:30 mile pace for 5 miles.

James Evans
01-31-2008, 11:50 AM
So how's it going? I can't be bothered to read the training log!

Suggestion to keep it simple: Do a longer run (ie a continous effort like one of the bench marks) and the next session do speed work.

ie:

A) 20 mins
B) 1 min on, 1 min off for 30 mins

C) One of your set routes
D) Hill reps (around 80-100 metres) x 5

Run the longer effort as easily and comfortably as you like. You're not racing. The speed work should work your arse off. Try and do these on consecutive days and then rest a day. Aim for 4 a week and progress slowly but you don't really need to be running for longer than 30 minutes.

These should be pretty time efficient.

James

Allen Yeh
01-31-2008, 11:55 AM
So how's it going? I can't be bothered to read the training log!

Not well, my wife this last month got worse. I think I did a total of 4 days of running the entire month of January. Twice the first week, and once a week the last 2 weeks. I keep trying to tell myself it's ok that I can't keep adding stuff onto my plate when I feel like I can't manage the plate as it is. Stress is a bitch.

Garrett Smith
07-01-2008, 05:19 PM
I feel ya, Allen.