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Neal Winkler
04-21-2007, 02:32 PM
Last year around spring I started to get a problem where I had to hock loogies everyday. When winter came around it went away, now that spring is here I'm starting to get the problem again and today my nose will not stop running. I definately think I have developed allergies.

Please tell me that you guys have some nice cures for this.

My diet = paleo with 1 or 2 cheat meals per week

Mike ODonnell
04-21-2007, 04:49 PM
Dairy has a link to mucus type of allergies.....

Garrett Smith
04-21-2007, 10:58 PM
Neal,
Chemtrails or not, I definitely believe that there are some strange nasty things in the air these days...even I've been tending towards the mildest of allergy symptoms this year...everyone is calling my office saying stuff like this.

Make sure you're gluten free...that could be the issue, even though it only shows up at certain times of year.

Steve Shafley
04-22-2007, 05:25 AM
Systematic elimination of the common "food allergens" might or might not help, but it's a good place to start.

I have read in a few places that drinking an infusion of the local honey has beneficial effects on allergies, but don't have any personal anecdotes to back it up.

Garrett Smith
04-22-2007, 08:40 AM
If it's a pollen thing, Steve's *local* honey idea is a good one. It's a simple form of an isopathic remedy...

Robert Allison
04-22-2007, 08:50 AM
Like Steve said, an elimination diet of some sort to test your sensitivity to food allergens is probably a good idea. If you are very sensitive, even one or two meals could be enough to set it off.

However, given that it seems to occur only in the spring, chances are pretty good that it is pollen or some other airborne allergen. I know some folks who have used local honey to clear up pollen-related allergy issues.

On Allen's thread about allergies, I mentioned quercetin. A mumber of allergy sufferers I know swear by it.

Neal,
Chemtrails or not, I definitely believe that there are some strange nasty things in the air these days...

I believe this conspiracy theory stuff belongs on the "karma" thread. ;)

Garrett Smith
04-22-2007, 01:25 PM
Eclectic Institute makes a (freeze-dried) Urtica dioica and Quercetin combo that I use. It's basically a natural antihistamine that doesn't cause any drowsiness.

FYI, Urtica dioica is stinging nettles. I highly suggest you only purchase the freeze-dried version, I believe Eclectic is very good at this particular product.

Robb Wolf
04-22-2007, 05:24 PM
Eclectic Institute makes a (freeze-dried) Urtica dioica and Quercetin combo that I use. It's basically a natural antihistamine that doesn't cause any drowsiness.

FYI, Urtica dioica is stinging nettles. I highly suggest you only purchase the freeze-dried version, I believe Eclectic is very good at this particular product.

The Urtic/quercetin combo is legit.

Neal Winkler
04-23-2007, 08:46 AM
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I seen the doctor last year because I got tired of having to spit up loogies all the time, and I actually asked him about food allergies. He said it wasn't that because my nostrils were inflammed, so it must be something airborne.

Where does one find local honey?

Robert Allison
04-23-2007, 08:56 AM
Where does one find local honey?

You might try a local tailgate or farmers markets. Also, health food stores will sometimes stock some honey from local producers.

If you don't have access to any of the above, you might check to see if your state has a beekeeping association (many do). They could probably refer you someone in your area who offers honey for sale.

Garrett Smith
04-23-2007, 03:52 PM
The nasal passages are part of the gastrointestinal tract *in a way*, so their inflammation can absolutely be connected to food allergies.

The concept of body parts/areas NOT being connected to another in ways that we can't even begin to fathom (how will we ever do a placebo-controlled, double-blind study on that?) is just asinine to me.

Allergic reactions are an immune system reaction. The immune system is SYSTEMIC!!! That means that symptoms can show up anywhere in the entire system.

If you aren't being conscious of being gluten free (not just "no grains"), let me add a story.

I had a patient who almost DIED of celiac as an infant. I suggested he still is intolerant of gluten, that this doesn't just "go away with age". He asked his MD, the doc said that he doesn't have any issues with it anymore.

So I asked him to do me a favor. Black box style. No wheat (all I asked him to do was wheat, none of the other things, because I knew wheat was the issue) for two weeks. He cheated four times in two weeks. By the end of the two weeks he was down from FIVE allergy meds, to ONE.

Gut not connected to the sinuses. My arse.

Mike ODonnell
04-23-2007, 03:57 PM
The nasal passages are part of the gastrointestinal tract *in a way*, so their inflammation can absolutely be connected to food allergies.

I've snorted beer out my nose while drinking.....beer goes into my gut....so therefore nose and gut are connected....wait....Yes I would say so...considering if I drink too much dairy my sinusitis acts up......4th grade pencil up nose incident I live with......

Pierre Auge
04-23-2007, 05:12 PM
My sinuses are permanently inflammed and have been for the past 3 years, since about a year after joining the army and living in the prairies...

I eat very little gluten (save the last week where I was living off pizza, ughh) and I consume very little for allergens as far as I am aware. What else can I do..

Hey thought here, I've heard of an allergy testing diet and I'm willing to try it but I've no idea where to reference it... Anyone?

Garrett Smith
04-23-2007, 07:28 PM
Pierre,
For an example of a rotation diet setup, see this http://www.specialfoods.com/rotationdietexample.html . This is the cheapest way to do it--it's very limited in the foods per day, thus it allows you to monitor/diary your symptoms and backtrack to eliminate possible offenders.

For many people, their leaky gut creates many food allergies, which may or may not be true--their guts are just letting in way too many things! This is relatively obvious on a food allergy test--I'd actually say that if a doc wastes a patient's money with a food allergy test when leaky gut is suspected, they need to learn about gluten (and nightshades). Funny thing, nightshades do not create antigen/antibody reactions with the immune system, so they don't tend to show up on those tests even when causing inflammation (which I believe they do in everybody, all the time).

I'm going to eventually do a blood food allergy test.

Robert Allison
04-23-2007, 07:31 PM
Here are a couple of articles with info on elimination diets:

http://ezinearticles.com/?Symptom-Assessment (http://ezinearticles.com/?Symptom-Assessment,-Food-Diary-and-Elimination-Diet-in-Food-Intolerance-and-Allergy:-A-Primer&id=300833)

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=diet&dbid=7

Also, if you do a Google search on "allergies" and then search within results for "elimination diet," you'll turn up a ton of websites.

BTW, Pierre, any word on your stuff?

Kim Chase
04-24-2007, 10:15 AM
Re: local honey. How much does one have to consume to help/how often? Is there any special way to take it or can I just use it as I normally would?

(BTW, I am a complete mess of allergies. Oral allergies to most raw veggies and fruit (can cook most of them). Food allergies to corn, wheat, eggs. Airborne/seasonal allergies to pretty much everything but dogs. Any advice would be most welcome. I am on allergy drops and take zyrtec when I absolutely have to.)

Garrett Smith
04-24-2007, 11:05 AM
Kim,
If I had to guess, I'd say you likely are suffering from leaky gut syndrome. Honey isn't going to help much in that situation, maybe not at all.

No gluten, nightshades, dairy, legumes, sugar, or artificial sweeteners. Toxic metal testing is in order. That's my take.

Kim Chase
04-24-2007, 01:21 PM
Honey won't even help the seasonal/airborne allergies?

Also, I googled around, but I don't get the connection with toxic metals... I wouldn't be surprised if I had elevated levels, though (I grew up in a mining town complete with smelter).

Garrett Smith
04-24-2007, 06:30 PM
Kim,
It would be the cherry on top if you had some amalgam fillings...

Based on your history alone, I'd suggest testing. Let me know if you're interested.

Kim Chase
04-26-2007, 07:41 AM
Nope, never a single cavity! (At least one part of my body cooperates with me). Actually, you probably know the town I grew up in... Bisbee, AZ. Just a couple hours south of you!

I am interested in the toxic metals thing, but I just don't understand why that would have an affect on my allergies/leaky gut.

Garrett Smith
04-26-2007, 08:54 AM
Metal transporters in intestine and brain: their involvement in metal-associated neurotoxicities.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17439925&query_hl=18&itool=pubmed_docsum

"Good" minerals (all minerals, toxic or not, are needed in some amount, however small) have an impact on leaky gut, as in zinc in this study:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11383597&query_hl=2&itool=pubmed_docsum

Changes in brain cells (astrocytes) associated with mercury, particularly permeability and glutamine transport (glutamine is crucial in the gut): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17182013&query_hl=12&itool=pubmed_docsum

That's just some of the stuff I could find on a casual search of Pubmed. Every patient of mine who has presented with significant fungal issue or digestive issues has tested high for heavy metals.

Kim Chase
04-27-2007, 08:14 AM
Thanks so much for all the great info, Garrett. Much appreciated!