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Ron Nelson
04-24-2007, 02:48 PM
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do;jsessionid=FD71EB381226975DC70B75FD22 506F4F.hydra?id=1543621

Read it; liked it; already have added the box one-legged squats to the workout.

Discuss.

Steve Shafley
04-24-2007, 02:50 PM
Good stuff.

The one legged stuff is really relevant, and I wish I would have known about it back in 1988 when I started playing rugby, or even sooner.

Dave Van Skike
04-24-2007, 03:03 PM
Good stuff.

The one legged stuff is really relevant, and I wish I would have known about it back in 1988 when I started playing rugby, or even sooner.


Seems like there is a lot of consensus on the value of single limb movements, (I freely prescribe one legged deadlifts to the wife...... "what's another word for pirate treasure?" )

but, is there a sense that single leg movements carry over to double leg movements? like squats and dl? I use single arm pressing almost half the time to provoke my two hand overhead press but in review, I'm not sure it works.

Ron Nelson
04-24-2007, 07:09 PM
Aaargh.

I get the impression that single leg carries over to double leg, but the opposite does not occur.

Dave Van Skike
04-24-2007, 08:17 PM
Aaargh.

I get the impression that single leg carries over to double leg, but the opposite does not occur.

I think it's booty.

Mike ODonnell
04-24-2007, 08:19 PM
I get the impression that single leg carries over to double leg, but the opposite does not occur.

Probably...depending on what you are looking at. Single leg will enhance all those wonderful stabilizes much like using DBs will vs BB. But squatting or DL with 2 legs doesnt mean someone can do a pistol with bodyweight only....you are only as strong as your weakest muscle allows you to be...

for most sports which is Boyle's main focus single leg transfers more to the specific movements and needs....unless it is a specific movement that requires a 2 legged stance push...so for most athletes they need single legged training especially for power, injury prevention, acceleration, deceleration and change of direction.

Steve Shafley
04-24-2007, 08:25 PM
Single leg WILL transfer over until a certain point, then it's nothing.

That's when the stabilizers and all that shit are optimized for the bilateral movement.

Craig Cooper
04-24-2007, 10:20 PM
Great article, well articulated. It reminds me that my training has been single leg lacking. I think that the movement spotlight in the next Pmenu should be single leg exercises.

-Ross Hunt
04-24-2007, 11:54 PM
There are serious limits to how much load you can put on your body with an unsupported single-limb exercise, though. The gap between a back squat and a split squat is a lot smaller than the gap between a split squat and a pistol.

Robb Wolf
04-25-2007, 06:40 AM
Good stuff. This jumped out at me:
"The key to the lateral sub-system is that we engage these additional muscles in their normal role of stabilizers, not as movers." This sounds eerily like crossfits take on the role of the abbs...mid-line stability.

Boyle knows his shit.

Allen Yeh
04-25-2007, 07:26 AM
Great article.

Incorporated the 1 leg straight leg deadlift yesterday and it was harder than it looked like it would be. Also I'm sure the front squats had something to do with it also but my glutes are super sore today, hamstrings are somewhat.

Allen Yeh
04-25-2007, 07:33 AM
Mike Boyles comments in the article discussion area are pretty good also.

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1543675

Ken Urakawa
04-25-2007, 07:52 AM
This sounds eerily like crossfits take on the role of the abbs...mid-line stability.

Latest USA Weightlifting newsletter had an article about training the abs for stability. Reiterated a lot of stuff that most people here probably know, but it was kind of cool read.

More high quality stuff from Boyle.

Ron Nelson
04-25-2007, 10:36 AM
Latest USA Weightlifting newsletter had an article about training the abs for stability. Reiterated a lot of stuff that most people here probably know, but it was kind of cool read.

More high quality stuff from Boyle.

Agree. Today my "stabilizers" hurt like a mutha.

I remember Greg preaching about the abs responding to static/isometric work better than loading or reps. In other words, L-sits and L-pull ups as opposed to loaded sit-ups and crunches. Later, I see Cressey and Robertson then others touting bridges and other static holds for mid-line stability.

Sometimes we get the answer before we know the question.

Steve Shafley
04-25-2007, 10:38 AM
The one leg stuff really seems to hit the glutes.

Ron Nelson
04-25-2007, 11:33 AM
I feel it there and in the abductors.

Daniel Christensen
04-26-2007, 04:51 AM
What would people recommend as a good source of single leg progressions? I've got (& quite like) The Vertical Jump Development Bible by Baggett, as it has a good range of single leg exercises (although it is a bit high-volume).

Mark Fenner
04-27-2007, 08:52 AM
What would people recommend as a good source of single leg progressions? I've got (& quite like) The Vertical Jump Development Bible by Baggett, as it has a good range of single leg exercises (although it is a bit high-volume).

VJDB is one of the best sports training books ever written. It 1) works, 2) is clear, 3) has a focused goal, and 4) explains why it does what it does.

So, two things:

1) If you are thinking about improving your jumping ability (or general power ability), just start the novice plyo routine and do it with your strength training. The alternating lunges (do reverse lunges if you like) and lunge jumps will get your started with unilateral movements using bodyweight.

2) If you want other unilateral movements and/or something for weight training days, I'd recommend two simple ones: Bulgarian split squats (a lunge with one foot on bench behind you face down and one foot on the floor -or- on a weight plate) and 1-leg RDL/SDL/DL (stand on one foot, let the other foot float up and back as you bend at the weight and touch the standing foot). Master these with bodyweight before moving on. And I mean master ... be able to do slow controlled ecc/pause/concentric for 20 reps. Balance will be an issue. That's ok ... it's your stabilizers saying: I'm not used to stabilizing.

Granted, that's a start, not a progression. For more ideas, look at Cressey and Robertson's (or maybe it's only by one of them) "single-leg supplements" at t-nation.

Regards,
Mark

kevin mckay
04-27-2007, 08:52 PM
I was doing the single leg squat today and found my knee would go out past my toe, is this bad? I was under the impression this could damage my knee, so I ended up doing the one legged squats with my back against the wall...

Garrett Smith
04-27-2007, 09:15 PM
Kevin,
Relax. With your heels down, the knees-over-the-toes thing is a non-issue. It becomes an issue as the heels start leaving the deck and the shear forces in the knee(s) starts rising drastically.

Eva Claire Synkowski
04-28-2007, 06:08 AM
i was super into one-legged everything a few years - to the deficit of two-legged anything unfortuanately- back after some chek stuff i read. if i remember correctly, chek is big on that slideboard leg curl with a swiss ball (no surprise there). definitely hits the hamstrings.

i "gave up" all my one-leg dls, lunges, lunge jumps, etc since joining an "official" xf gym a year ago, and its definitely what ive missed the most.

ive rejoined a golds (sigh) to get more strength days in - looking forward to adding these back in. good article.

Robert Allison
04-28-2007, 07:25 AM
I also was first exposed to a lot of one legged exercises through Chek. Frank Forencich, author of Go Animal, is pretty big on them as well.

I am doing a modified SS routine right now, but I am still use some one leg stuff as auxiliary work.

Another great article by Boyle.

Robert Allison
04-28-2007, 07:40 AM
"The key to the lateral sub-system is that we engage these additional muscles in their normal role of stabilizers, not as movers."

IIRC, Ethan Reeves, the strength coach at Wake Forest, also uses one-armed upper body exercises for their ability to activate stabilizer muscles in the core. In both cases, the use of only one limb creates instability, which recruits the stabilizers.

Steve Shafley
04-28-2007, 12:52 PM
wrt 1 leg stuff, I think you can add it in before the WOD as "practice".

It's got value, for sure.

kevin mckay
04-28-2007, 06:55 PM
Wow those one legged squats kicked my ass! My glutes are fried today