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Allen Yeh
05-07-2007, 06:04 AM
http://www.coreperformance.com/article.php?p=3&s=1&id=479

While I read this I luckily could really only identify with the first item of "bad moods" which isn't a great thing but it's better than it used to be when I was heavily into the bodybuilding type training and did in fact eschew social events to go train or it would have messed with one of my meals of the day. So while I've improved, I still need to relax a little bit more.

What about you?

Scott Kustes
05-07-2007, 07:52 AM
I don't identify with any of them. Perhaps working out with an injury, but if I have an injury, I avoid that joint/muscle.

kevin mckay
05-07-2007, 09:36 PM
Sounds like ocd rather than some specialized fitness disorder.

Yael Grauer
05-07-2007, 09:48 PM
** You frequently increase your intensity or volume to maintain a certain level of fitness.

** Your training routine makes it difficult to exercise with others.


Those two under the "unrealistic expectations" category? Hmmm....

Garrett Smith
05-08-2007, 06:56 AM
This is actually relatively easy to observe in others.

I'm so sad, in today's day and age, I likely have both eating and exercise disorders.

I call it self-discipline in the face of a well-engineered plan to create weak and sick people. But hey, that's just me.

Or...are there others???

Will Schultz
05-08-2007, 08:41 AM
Those two under the "unrealistic expectations" category? Hmmm....


Exactly what I was thinking.

Robb Wolf
05-08-2007, 08:42 AM
I'm much more laid back about this stuff than i used to be. The teen and early 20's were pretty compulsive but those standards.

I would have NEVER tried something like intermittent fasting in the past for fear of muscle loss. ironically it has lead to muscle gain!

Heather Gibbons made an interesting point: "I dont smoke, I rarely drink...if I'm a little compulsive about working out it's not that bad in the grand scheme of things..."

Mike ODonnell
05-08-2007, 08:43 AM
I see many people with the "more is better" attitude....so they spend hours in a gym....7 days a week....and wonder why they see little to no results.....

I thank the gyms, cardio manufacturers, aerobic tapes and other media outlets for promoting how many calories you burn per hour.....so people think they need hours a day....instead of wondering how can I keep muscle and burn fat through nutrition....but then again, it's that ignorance that keeps me employed as a trainer....

Kevin Anderson
05-08-2007, 09:04 AM
I am definitely dependent. My job takes the brunt of it by design and I like to think that my family isn't really effected except on Saturdays when as my wife says, everything revolved around my *!%$#! workout. If I don't get it in then I am usually in a bad mood and we get in a fight. The one sport thing is true for me as well. Before I began focusing just on olympic lifting it was much easier to get a workout in and I could be more flexible, play basketball, mountain bike, etc. Now it is just workout, recover and eat. I do cut loose when it comes to drinking on the weekends which is a shame because it really screws my performance, especially balance for me. My wife claims she works out just so she can drink and eat chips and queso although I think she is in a bit of denial since she hasn't missed but one training session with her crossfit class since she started at the beginning of the year. The kicker for me is that once you start this olympic lifting thing, with a goal in mind, is that I can't just quit (or slowdown) or all that work will have been wasted.

-Ross Hunt
05-10-2007, 07:49 PM
"The search for perfection continues although acceptable standards have already been met."

If that's insanity, check me in to the mental ward, Doc, stat!


I can see it now:

'Doctor, my son has a problem. He met this world-class weightlifter on a trip last year, and ever since then, he hasn't stopped training. He's broken all the USA records for his weight class and age, but when I tell him that he should stop training and just take it easy, he looks at me like I'm crazy and starts babbling about Greeks and Chinese. He won't have a second helping of dessert anymore. He's getting so muscular that his morbidly obese brother is starting to feel really self-conscious. I was trying to let it go, but last week he got suspended when he tried to get his P.E. teacher to let him go lift weights when the P.E. class assignment was XBox Live. I'm at the end of my rope. Please help me. I just want my little baby to like normal again!!!'

'It's all right, Ma'am. Just give him this experimental prescription sedative that's only been tested on chimpanzees. He'll be obese and playing his Xbox with his little brother like nothing happened... just call me if he starts experiencing sudden seizures or cancer, and everything'll be fine, kay?'

Derek Simonds
05-11-2007, 12:40 PM
"The search for perfection continues although acceptable standards have already been met."

If that's insanity, check me in to the mental ward, Doc, stat!


I can see it now:

'Doctor, my son has a problem. He met this world-class weightlifter on a trip last year, and ever since then, he hasn't stopped training. He's broken all the USA records for his weight class and age, but when I tell him that he should stop training and just take it easy, he looks at me like I'm crazy and starts babbling about Greeks and Chinese. He won't have a second helping of dessert anymore. He's getting so muscular that his morbidly obese brother is starting to feel really self-conscious. I was trying to let it go, but last week he got suspended when he tried to get his P.E. teacher to let him go lift weights when the P.E. class assignment was XBox Live. I'm at the end of my rope. Please help me. I just want my little baby to like normal again!!!'

'It's all right, Ma'am. Just give him this experimental prescription sedative that's only been tested on chimpanzees. He'll be obese and playing his Xbox with his little brother like nothing happened... just call me if he starts experiencing sudden seizures or cancer, and everything'll be fine, kay?'

God if that isn't the truth. I absolutely despise the whole medicate the child to control behavior industry we have now.

I have a 7 year old son and a 5 year old daughter who both are interested in weightlifting. This morning I was doing OHS with a jo in the kitchen while they were eating. My son finishes breakfast and says I want to do what in you do with the weights. I say ok and give him the jo and he sets up and does a snatch. It was pretty classic.

Elliot Royce
05-11-2007, 02:40 PM
I would say that a related aspect is setting expectations too high. As Mike has pointed out to me several times, trying to do 4 sports (boxing, O lifting, CF, and hockey) each week at age 45 may be excessive. I may not be overtraining but I'm not accomplishing my objectives. I dropped the boxing and CF and focused on hockey and O lifting.

My injury rate has declined and I am making very good progress on the O lifts (see my log for evidence).

I do feel guilty when I don't lift but some sense of guilt is not bad. It's a motivator to get to the gym and I get over it.

Unless you have a body image problem and as long as your overall health is improving, then I'm not sure I see a big problem with being "addicted" to exercise. Of course it sells magazines to tell people that exercising too much (implication exercising at all) is unhealthy for you!

Yael Grauer
05-14-2007, 05:15 PM
Unless you have a body image problem and as long as your overall health is improving, then I'm not sure I see a big problem with being "addicted" to exercise.

I think a large majority of women have body image problems.

And a lot of men too though they are less likely to admit it.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1632112.stm

Mike ODonnell
05-14-2007, 05:27 PM
I would say that a related aspect is setting expectations too high. As Mike has pointed out to me several times, trying to do 4 sports (boxing, O lifting, CF, and hockey) each week at age 45 may be excessive. I may not be overtraining but I'm not accomplishing my objectives. I dropped the boxing and CF and focused on hockey and O lifting.

It's going to more gratifying to really master a couple of activities......rather than be average at them all.....

I've cut more "sport" type activities out of my life and only focus on those I really enjoy....not just stuff to keep "active"...as now I spend more time pursuing other things such as reading more....doing "nothing" more often....enjoying nature....etc....much more rewarding life now that I can slow it down and really appreciate everything that I let into my life....it's about the journey for me now....I gave up the whole living at the gym because I was obsessed about how I looked...and I never looked good enough....that's common with anyone who's main reason for working out is based upon physical appearance....I go for health now and the look just comes with it....

Robb Wolf
05-15-2007, 08:13 AM
It's going to more gratifying to really master a couple of activities......rather than be average at them all.....

I've cut more "sport" type activities out of my life and only focus on those I really enjoy....not just stuff to keep "active"...as now I spend more time pursuing other things such as reading more....doing "nothing" more often....enjoying nature....etc....much more rewarding life now that I can slow it down and really appreciate everything that I let into my life....it's about the journey for me now....I gave up the whole living at the gym because I was obsessed about how I looked...and I never looked good enough....that's common with anyone who's main reason for working out is based upon physical appearance....I go for health now and the look just comes with it....

That's a tough process IMO...learning to do things for the joy of it and not out of an ego-driven need. That very word "driven"...it carries such favorable connotations but think about it. it conjures up an image of some whipped animal being driven forward!

But then the question arises: What about excellence? How does one pursue excellence for the sake of the process...being fully engaged and not for some external on again, off again validation?

Steve Shafley
05-15-2007, 10:11 AM
Funny. I used to be really devoted to my training. Now I'm not all that devoted to it, though I am swinging back another way.

Example: I don't train on vacation. I will hike, bike, kayak, swim, bodysurf, raft, etc, but I will not work out. I don't even know if I'd train if there was a fully equipped gym next door, but that would make it more likely.

Mike ODonnell
05-15-2007, 10:38 AM
I find activites more enjoyable (and perform better too) when I am not worried about performance, scores, times, what if I can't do it, etc....all that wasted energy. Even the top athletes will talk about being in the zone...just doing....and will say they have top performances.....I know scores and competitions motivate people...but if you are not worrying about the outcome and trying your best anyways...you should excell...much like doing something alone...and then in front of 10000 people....which will you do better? The physical act of performing is not different...just your perception and everything else that is now affecting you....

Russell Greene
05-15-2007, 02:02 PM
I am definitely exercise dependent, and you know what, I don't give a damn. If I'd rather workout than go party with friends or study a few extra hours, does that make me mentally unhealthy? If working out is fulfilling to me and I feel good when I do it and worse when I don't, am I excessively motivated? The interesting thing is that with Crossfit my exercise dependency, which seems to be considered anti-social behavior, has actually led to two of the best friendships I have.

I am annoyed by stuff which says, 80-90% of the population is X, therefore if you are not X then there is something wrong with you and you should seek counseling or purchase pharmaceuticals. Why should normal be considered optimal?

Derek Simonds
05-15-2007, 02:37 PM
I have lived my entire life as a jack of all trades master of none. I am involved in many different endeavors in work, exercise and hobbies. I am better than average at a majority of them. I understand what MOD is saying but the difference is to me if a given activity doesn't give me something back than I don't do it.

Today I lift, train for an olympic triathlon in sept, bjj, wakeboard, waterski, mountain bike and many other sports. All of them except bjj my family participates with me, even the triathlon training. I have played golf socially and for work but it doesn't appeal to me at all. I lose focus after 6 holes and than I wonder why I am wasting my time on the course. I am in a golf outing at the end of May for my company and I already am thinking about it.

I know scores and competitions motivate people...but if you are not worrying about the outcome and trying your best anyways...you should excell...much like doing something alone...and then in front of 10000 people....which will you do better?

I think what you are talking about is passion. If you are passionate about something you will excel in private and in public. Performing in public changes everything. I will never forget the first time I put on a pair of Tri Trunks getting ready for a race. Holy Crap there is nothing to hide behind there. It gave me great motivation to be ready to put those on and walk amongst the crowd.

Garrett Smith
05-15-2007, 05:55 PM
Shaf,
I'm with you. I used to think I'd work out on vacation, I never seem to bring myself to (except when I was on a cruise ship with all the land whales and just had to do SOMETHING to get the blood flowing).

My wife and I have decided to strive for "active" vacations, where the activities planned involve some sort, however small, of physical exertion. I always feel like so much more has been accomplished/achieved if I contribute some level of energy to it...

Jamila Bey
05-15-2007, 10:16 PM
I become depressed if I don't work out for more than three days. Vacations aside, I get ansy and bitchy and I feel unwell if I don't get a good sweat and sustain it for half an hour or more. Worse still is that when I don't work out, I want a 4 people sized serving of pasta and garlic cheese toast and red wine and pizza and chocolate. And I know it's that my childhood favorite comfort foods make me feel emotionally better because I'm feeling sluggish from not moving. I eat this junk and then don't want to work out and it's a horrible cycle.

I know I'm not a doctor, but my opinion is that Americans need to stop sucking down the psych meds and get into the gym and move. Even better would be getting outside in the fresh air and moving around.
We're fat and unhappy and in debt as a culture because we don't move anymore and we turn to eating out and drinking and shopping to make us feel better when some nice exertion everyday would do the trick.

I know far too many folks on psych meds who need to play a sport instead of taking a tablet.

chris hill
05-16-2007, 06:08 AM
Worse still is that when I don't work out, I want a 4 people sized serving of pasta and garlic cheese toast and red wine and pizza and chocolate. And I know it's that my childhood favorite comfort foods make me feel emotionally better because I'm feeling sluggish from not moving. I eat this junk and then don't want to work out and it's a horrible cycle.

boy do i know that feeling!

train well = eat well to support training

no training = not bothering to eat well

i know i do it and i need to sort myself out

Scott Kustes
05-16-2007, 06:22 AM
I guess I'm weird...I worked out twice on my honeymoon (with actual exercise implements...heart rate was elevated a few other times) and 3 times on my last vacation.

Jamila Bey
05-16-2007, 01:59 PM
Nerd

-Ross Hunt
05-16-2007, 05:40 PM
I think a large majority of women have body image problems.

And a lot of men too though they are less likely to admit it.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1632112.stm

I wonder if part of the reason 'body image problems' are on the rise is just that bodies are getting uglier. :D

Seriously, though, with obesity and general lack of fitness on the rise, a corresponding rise of dissatisfaction with one's body might be a sign of sanity more than the contrary. And for every guy or girl who comes forward with their 'psychological problem,' how many do we not hear about who use it as motivation to improve their physique and then subsequently don't worry about it any more?

Of course, I'm not saying that there aren't many legit cases of body dysmorphia--obsessive bodybuilders, girls who feel compelled to try to stay at unhealthily low body weights, and so on.

Mike ODonnell
05-16-2007, 06:18 PM
The general media, movies, etc don't help with the emotional aspect of health and what are person should look like....we reward and glorify those that have a look, the beautiful people, give them money and fame, call them role models, put them on tv and magazines....not for who they are...not for what they do....just because they have a look....Paris Hilton case in point....

Society has created this whole image awareness....and has no desire to fix it...just put people on more medications for it....depression leads to emotional eating....emotional eating leads to more obesity....leads to less self positive image....and downward the spiral goes....

Yael Grauer
05-16-2007, 06:30 PM
I was working with this gal a couple weeks ago... We worked from 1:30 to 11:30 and the whole time she didn't eat anything. We were driving to different locations and around 9:30 while paying for gas I also bought some jerky and (gasp!) started eating it. The girl like flipped out. She gave me a long lecture about how I shouldn't eat after 8 because I will get fat, and that's what sumo wrestlers do, and on and on and on. It was insane. I was like, "Are you kidding me?" I tried to explain to her that stressing out was less healthy than eating jerky...

Mike ODonnell
05-16-2007, 08:31 PM
I was working with this gal a couple weeks ago... We worked from 1:30 to 11:30 and the whole time she didn't eat anything. We were driving to different locations and around 9:30 while paying for gas I also bought some jerky and (gasp!) started eating it. The girl like flipped out. She gave me a long lecture about how I shouldn't eat after 8 because I will get fat, and that's what sumo wrestlers do, and on and on and on. It was insane. I was like, "Are you kidding me?" I tried to explain to her that stressing out was less healthy than eating jerky...

Why are you hanging out with trainers from LA Fitness??

Yael Grauer
05-16-2007, 08:38 PM
Why are you hanging out with trainers from LA Fitness??

LOL!!! At least she didn't chase me with calipers or try to sell me anything!!

Allen Yeh
05-17-2007, 04:56 AM
I was working with this gal a couple weeks ago... We worked from 1:30 to 11:30 and the whole time she didn't eat anything. We were driving to different locations and around 9:30 while paying for gas I also bought some jerky and (gasp!) started eating it. The girl like flipped out. She gave me a long lecture about how I shouldn't eat after 8 because I will get fat, and that's what sumo wrestlers do, and on and on and on. It was insane. I was like, "Are you kidding me?" I tried to explain to her that stressing out was less healthy than eating jerky...

Should have told her that not everyone wants to be a waif.

Jamila Bey
05-18-2007, 02:05 AM
Brick (bomp chic ow) House!

Yeah... I don't ever want to lose my (very cute even I must admit) backside. It's where my power lie!

For football, I mean.