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-   -   checked out judo (http://www.catalystathletics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4611)

Anton Emery 08-24-2009 09:14 PM

checked out judo
 
Checked out a judo class tonight at a local community center. Man it was fun, i am going to try to go once or twice a week to complement my BJJ. That way i can get some decent takedown skills as well. It was fun too because the judo guys seem equally interested in my ground work, so we rolled alot after class.



Anton

Greg Davis 08-25-2009 05:16 AM

i think judo is great too but i just cant handle the strict adherence to the traditional names and methods that the instructor i tried out uses... he teaches at a predominantly bjj gym so i just kept thinking like come on dude u cant teach it like youre teaching to kids who are taking on judo as their sole martial art

Grissim Connery 08-25-2009 01:20 PM

recently i've been focusing more on judo. the best thing about using judo on bjj guys is that for the most part, none of us are super knowledgeable on counter throws. thus guys will pretty much just try to block your throws instead of countering them. as a result, you really have no inhibitions to run in and try to trow dudes. worst case scenario, he blocks you and nothing happens.

then again, a bad seio nage will get you choked. i mostly lead everything into an uchi mata, which ends pretty safely most the time.

does anybody have good tips on tai otoshi? i'm having trouble picking apart the throw.

Gant Grimes 08-25-2009 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grissim Connery (Post 61844)
recently i've been focusing more on judo. the best thing about using judo on bjj guys is that for the most part, none of us are super knowledgeable on counter throws. thus guys will pretty much just try to block your throws instead of countering them. as a result, you really have no inhibitions to run in and try to trow dudes. worst case scenario, he blocks you and nothing happens.

then again, a bad seio nage will get you choked. i mostly lead everything into an uchi mata, which ends pretty safely most the time.

does anybody have good tips on tai otoshi? i'm having trouble picking apart the throw.

Good point re: counter throws. You can try more of the high amplitude throws you see in judo comps with less risk of being countered. Instead of just flinging them down (since you don't get extra points), you can adjust your grip to land in a better position.

A bad seo will get you choked, so don't be sloppy with it. Move your left arm from under your opponent's elbow to the lower part of his bicep (just above the crease of the elbow). Now when you turn in, he'll be unable to choke you.

You can make an easy adjustment to tai otoshi. First, grip high collar or even over the shoulder and around the back. Second, make it a terminal throw (take uke down and land on top of him). Instead of throwing a classic tai otoshi, bend your right knee and shoot your toe just past his toe. Twist your hips, and it will be a fast, violent throw. If you pull on his right arm, you'll land right on top of his ribs and be in a tight kesa gatame--holding his right arm. From there, you can either go for an arm bar or transition to side control.

I hope that makes sense. I might need to find a clip or film it for you.

Anton Emery 08-25-2009 04:18 PM

Cool stuff, thanks Gant.

I have been working on Uchi Mata pretty regularly myself during free time in BJJ. There are probably easier throws to be learning, but it just feels right. Now i just have to get consistent enough so i can use it. My biggest problem seems to be being to get my plant food underneath their center of gravity enough, its usually to far out and then i dont have the leverage for the throw.



Anton

Derek Simonds 08-25-2009 06:13 PM

Oh I wish I was training Judo north of Dallas next week. Nice description Gant.

Gant Grimes 08-25-2009 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Anton Emery (Post 61849)
Cool stuff, thanks Gant.

I have been working on Uchi Mata pretty regularly myself during free time in BJJ. There are probably easier throws to be learning, but it just feels right. Now i just have to get consistent enough so i can use it. My biggest problem seems to be being to get my plant food underneath their center of gravity enough, its usually to far out and then i dont have the leverage for the throw.



Anton

Uchi mata is a complex throw (mine isn't very good). But it's a "magazine cover" throw. I once lost a match to a kid with a brilliant uchi mata. My balls were in my rib cage, and I was on my back before I could do anything about it.

Be sure you have the principles of koshi guruma, o goshi, tsuri goshi, and harai goshi down before trying uchi mata against a talented thrower.

Chuck Kechter 08-26-2009 02:22 PM

Good stuff Gant!

And Judo (I've been studying it since 1982) rules! :)

Grissim Connery 08-27-2009 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gant Grimes (Post 61845)

You can make an easy adjustment to tai otoshi. First, grip high collar or even over the shoulder and around the back. Second, make it a terminal throw (take uke down and land on top of him). Instead of throwing a classic tai otoshi, bend your right knee and shoot your toe just past his toe. Twist your hips, and it will be a fast, violent throw. If you pull on his right arm, you'll land right on top of his ribs and be in a tight kesa gatame--holding his right arm. From there, you can either go for an arm bar or transition to side control.

I hope that makes sense. I might need to find a clip or film it for you.

i've watched tons of clips on it. i guess my problem is more in the setup.

which foot do i want his weight to be on, his front leg or back leg?

the most recent setup i've been trying is threatening osoto-gari on his right leg, then when he steps back to avoid it, i rotate my hips through, ending with my right leg extended and left leg based under me. one reference mentioned that you want your body to be in a line with his big toes. by getting him to avoid osoto-gari, he pulls his feet into position so that the big toes align as such.

would kosoto-gari be a better option?

is the point on which the opponent rotatoes the hip on your body, the shoulder, or neither? i understand that this is primarily a hand technique, but i'm still confused by this mentality.

is the direction of the throw across my body or down to the ground? my initial assumptions were that the opponent was to be thrown downward since it's tai otoshi and not tai nage or something.

Gant Grimes 09-01-2009 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grissim Connery (Post 61955)
i've watched tons of clips on it. i guess my problem is more in the setup.

which foot do i want his weight to be on, his front leg or back leg?

the most recent setup i've been trying is threatening osoto-gari on his right leg, then when he steps back to avoid it, i rotate my hips through, ending with my right leg extended and left leg based under me. one reference mentioned that you want your body to be in a line with his big toes. by getting him to avoid osoto-gari, he pulls his feet into position so that the big toes align as such.

would kosoto-gari be a better option?

is the point on which the opponent rotatoes the hip on your body, the shoulder, or neither? i understand that this is primarily a hand technique, but i'm still confused by this mentality.

is the direction of the throw across my body or down to the ground? my initial assumptions were that the opponent was to be thrown downward since it's tai otoshi and not tai nage or something.

Don't think of front/back leg. His weight should be broken to his right front (he'll typically have weight on his right leg, but don't get caught up in that).

I'll film this for you at my group tonight and work some ko soto in so you see how it can fit.

Gi or no gi?


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