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Brian Merklin 10-07-2009 12:11 PM

Training Problems with a Weird Schedule
 
So I was just offered a position at my dream job. This is a huge opportunity for me and there is no question I will take the offer.

However, the one problem is the shifts are pretty funky: two weeks on, followed by two weeks off. This is to be out in the middle of Nevada which is about a 9 hour commute for me.

The obvious problem is how do I work a training schedule around this? We will be furnished living quarters, but no fitness equipment - and there is no gym in the local town. I had considered just trucking my own weights with me, but it's going to be a pretty rugged drive both ways, and 300+ pounds of extra weight in my pickup isn't something I think I'm going to do. The hours of actual work are sporadic and intermittent; sleep and food are a take-em-when-you-get-em deal.

Any opinions/suggestions/experience on this? Would a two week on/off training schedule work for strength gains?

Sorry about the weird question, but I've been doing pretty well lately with gains and I'm a little bummed about possibly halting or reversing them.

Anything is appreciated.

Brian

Arden Cogar Jr. 10-07-2009 12:34 PM

Brian,
Interesting delimma. Personally, I would bring some weights with me. Bumpers, Bar, and two or three kettlebells. I would train when I could and keep it to cleans, pulls, snatches and drill work from the floor. Do the kettlebells for conditioning - if you can and have the steam.

Then when you're home. Do two a days - Bulgarian volume train, baby!!

That's me. I like volume and frequency. But I've seen powerlifters actually benefit from two week on, one week off training. But never two week on, two week off.

I would find a way to do something to maintain while you're gone. Kettlebells at the minumum. Portable. Easy to transport. Don't take up a lot of room. And very functional.

Don't know if that helps at all?

All the best,
Arden

Mike ODonnell 10-07-2009 01:03 PM

Do bodyweight exercises when you are on the road....lift weights when you are not. The combo and break in routines might actually just be the best thing your body is after. You can get things like portable bodyweight bars, straps, weight vests and even resistance bands instead of trying to commute with heavy weights.

You can see what I mean under the equipment options in our bodyweight workout manual here.

That and you can signup for the FREE randomized bodyweight workout circuits here 3x a week as well....so you don't have to think about what to do next.

Fitness and working out doesn't have to be complicated...and I am enjoying the freedom with more bodyweight/band training vs needing a gym for equipment (of course that doesn't mean you can't go lift some heavy weights here and there...all depends really on what you are after with your goals and lifestyle).

Gavin Harrison 10-07-2009 06:31 PM

I've never read this book, but I've heard a lot of good things about Ross Enamait. I think this is the most applicable books:

Never Gymless.
Infinite Intensity

Kettle Bells are also a good option, but learning how to make bodyweight exercises work for you is almost necessary here.

michael cooley 10-08-2009 08:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian Merklin (Post 63680)
So I was just offered a position at my dream job. This is a huge opportunity for me and there is no question I will take the offer.

However, the one problem is the shifts are pretty funky: two weeks on, followed by two weeks off. This is to be out in the middle of Nevada which is about a 9 hour commute for me.

The obvious problem is how do I work a training schedule around this? We will be furnished living quarters, but no fitness equipment - and there is no gym in the local town. I had considered just trucking my own weights with me, but it's going to be a pretty rugged drive both ways, and 300+ pounds of extra weight in my pickup isn't something I think I'm going to do. The hours of actual work are sporadic and intermittent; sleep and food are a take-em-when-you-get-em deal.

Any opinions/suggestions/experience on this? Would a two week on/off training schedule work for strength gains?

Sorry about the weird question, but I've been doing pretty well lately with gains and I'm a little bummed about possibly halting or reversing them.

Anything is appreciated.

Brian

Congratulations on the dream job - especially in this economy!

To your question, it would be helpful to know what your current training and goals are like - general strength?, powerlifting?, o-lifting?, crossfit?

For example, you might hit the weights heavy and hard during your two weeks at home (squats, deadlifts, cleans, whatever), then load nothing more than a few kettlebells for your two weeks "on site" and, during that time, focus on kettlebell and bodyweight movements.

mpc

Andy Robinson 10-08-2009 12:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gavin Harrison (Post 63687)
I've never read this book, but I've heard a lot of good things about Ross Enamait. I think this is the most applicable books:

Never Gymless.
Infinite Intensity

Kettle Bells are also a good option, but learning how to make bodyweight exercises work for you is almost necessary here.

Good idea, both of thes books kick ass.
Never gymless is all BW
Infinite intensity is BW mixed with DB's and a little bit of ring stuff.


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