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-   -   Study on DHA only and bleeding times (http://www.catalystathletics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4988)

Garrett Smith 01-05-2010 01:55 PM

Study on DHA only and bleeding times
 
For those interested in the topic, which seems to be coming up here often:
The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid on platelet function, platelet fatty acid composition, and blood coagulation in humans.
Quote:

The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the absence of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has been studied infrequently in humans under controlled conditions. This 120-d study followed healthy, adult male volunteers who lived in the metabolic research unit (MRU) of the Western Human Nutrition Research Center for the entire study. The basal (low-DHA) diet consisted of natural foods (30 en% fat, 15 en% protein, and 55 en% carbohydrate), containing < 50 mg/d of DHA, and met the recommended daily intake for all essential nutrients. The high-DHA (intervention) diet was similar except that 6 g/d of DHA in the form of a triglyceride containing 40% DHA replaced an equal amount of safflower oil in the basal diet. The subjects (ages 20 to 39) were within -10 to +20% of ideal body weight, nonsmoking, and not allowed alcohol in the MRU. Their exercise level was constant, and their body weights were maintained within 2% of entry level. They were initially fed the low-DHA diet for 30 d. On day 31, six subjects (intervention, group A) were placed on the high-DHA diet; the other four subjects (controls, group B) remained on the low-DHA diet. Platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma was determined using ADP, collagen, and arachidonic acid. No statistical differences could be detected between the amount of agonist required to produce 50% aggregation of platelet-rich plasma before and after the subjects consumed the high-DHA diet. The prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and the antithrombin-III levels in the subjects were determined, and, again, there were no statistically significant differences in these three parameters when their values were compared before and after the subjects consumed the high-DHA diet. In addition, the in vivo bleeding times did not show any significant difference before and after the subjects consumed the high-DHA diet (9.4 +/- 3.1 min before and 8.0 +/- 3.4 min after). Platelets from the volunteers exhibited more than a threefold increase in their DHA content from 1.54 +/- 0.16 to 5.48 +/- 1.21 (wt%) during the DHA feeding period. The EPA content of the subjects' platelets increased from 0.34 +/- 0.12 to 2.67 +/- 0.91 (wt%) during the high-DHA diet despite the absence of EPA in the subjects' diets. The results from this study on blood clotting parameters and in vitro platelet aggregation suggest that adding 6 g/d of dietary DHA for 90 d to a typical Western diet containing less than 50 mg/d of DHA produces no observable physiological changes in blood coagulation, platelet function, or thrombotic tendencies in healthy, adult males.
Note that is DHA only. No EPA.

Ryan Secor 01-05-2010 09:17 PM

Very interesting - thanks for throwing this up.

Steven Low 01-05-2010 09:35 PM

So basically "high" doses of DHA aren't anti-coagulent. 6g of just DHA is pretty high relatively speaking.

I guess it's mostly the EPA that's anti-coag.

Ryan Secor 01-05-2010 11:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steven Low (Post 68583)
So basically "high" doses of DHA aren't anti-coagulent. 6g of just DHA is pretty high relatively speaking.

I guess it's mostly the EPA that's anti-coag.

Which for those just passing through can be off-set by Vitamin K addressed more in this thread (scroll down to comment #8 and on).

Garrett Smith 01-06-2010 05:38 AM

I'm doing some research on DHA & EPA right now for Dr. James Wilson (the Adrenal Fatigue book author, I work for his company and they are about to bring to market a new high DHA fish oil).

It appears that EPA has some immune-suppressing qualities.

EPA may be the main coagulation-impairing partner of the two.

When supplementing DHA, both DHA and EPA levels rise in the body.

I'm considering switching to high-DHA supplementation for myself and my family (later I'll consider the patients, but I'm the guinea pig first).


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