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-   -   Can you be 100% Post Surgery (http://www.catalystathletics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5891)

Steve Forman 11-24-2010 08:39 PM

Can you be 100% Post Surgery
 
I was thinking and talking about injury and recovery the other day. Not having ever had surgery myself, I was asking. Post surgery, can your muscles, ligaments or tendons recovery to 100% flexibility and or strength? I see a fair amount of torn rotator cuff injuries, most post surgical. Seems they have a decreased ROM and

Logically I say no. But wanted to ask you all. If there are articles and or studies, that would be helpful as well.

Thanks,
Steve

Rasmus Thomsen 11-25-2010 05:12 AM

I had a surgery due to some torn labrum and a partially torn tendon in my shoulder. I'm now 99%, flexibility is somewhat restricted but it's my own fault I haven't kept up the stretching, so I'm working on it now. I believe in 1 year it will be 99,9% :D

Steven Low 11-25-2010 09:44 AM

Depends what you mean by 100%.

Can you easily overcome your old PRs? Sure.

Can you overcome your genetic ceiling if you made it there.... maybe.

Depends on the type of injury. Some, like ACL replacement after tear, will be stronger than your old ACL (because it's not stretched out) especially if its a clean tear.

With proper rehab and recovery almost anything is possible honestly...

Jarod Barker 11-26-2010 07:53 PM

Purely based on observation, I'd say it goes both ways. I have a buddy who had shoulder surgery for a torn labrum, and he'll tell you it's never been the same ever again, and he's done the rehab, TENS unit, all kinds of stuff, the flexibility just never came back.

On the other hand, I trained with a guy who had to have knee surgery for a torn ACL, and he swears it's better now that it was before he injured it. Now, I don't know how long he may have been dealing with a low grade injury before needing surgery, but that's a pretty testimonial to say it's better than it was before the injury. I think a lot of it just comes down to how well you heal and how invasive the surgery is.

Derek Weaver 11-27-2010 06:45 PM

Tommy John surgery fairly often results in a stronger throwing arm.

I had my right shoulder scoped about 8 years ago. There are some things that just don't work right regarding my shoulder ROM, other things are fine.

For example, bench pressing, which is not shoulder friendly, is fine for my shoulder. If anything, I have increased stability on my right side. I guess due to the slight lack of mobility.

I remember hearing a CF podcast with Kelly Starrett, where he noted that after a tear, or a surgery, soft tissue never fully heals. It won't be the same. But it can normalize.

Kyle Collins 11-29-2010 02:34 PM

I've had my shoulder operated on for a torn Labrum. I guess it depends on what you define 100% as, but my shoulder is stronger and healthier than it has ever been. It has decreased external range of motion but that's because once it go to sufficient ROM for what I needed it to do I stopped doing the long hold passive stretching and just do some shorter duration and dynamic stuff.

I guess the question would be, if I was training and living and eating properly before it happened where would my shoulder have been? The changes I have made as a result of the injury have made it better than ever.

Whenever I ask myself this question I look at some professional athletes who have had a similar surgery as me, such as Dwayne Wade. This is a good indicator of what is possible because he has access to the best docs and care. Do you think his shoulder isn't 100%? He wouldn't be playing basketball at such a high level if it wasn't, his numbers the past 2 years with no help on his team are better than the pre-injury numbers when he had shaq on the team.

I guess all of this though is anecdotal and might be useless info.

Jarod Barker 11-30-2010 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kyle Collins (Post 83510)
I've had my shoulder operated on for a torn Labrum. I guess it depends on what you define 100% as, but my shoulder is stronger and healthier than it has ever been. It has decreased external range of motion but that's because once it go to sufficient ROM for what I needed it to do I stopped doing the long hold passive stretching and just do some shorter duration and dynamic stuff.

I guess the question would be, if I was training and living and eating properly before it happened where would my shoulder have been? The changes I have made as a result of the injury have made it better than ever.

Whenever I ask myself this question I look at some professional athletes who have had a similar surgery as me, such as Dwayne Wade. This is a good indicator of what is possible because he has access to the best docs and care. Do you think his shoulder isn't 100%? He wouldn't be playing basketball at such a high level if it wasn't, his numbers the past 2 years with no help on his team are better than the pre-injury numbers when he had shaq on the team.

I guess all of this though is anecdotal and might be useless info.

It's stronger now compared to pre-surgery, but how does it compare to your other shoulder? Is it on equal footing or is it still your weaker shoulder?

Kyle Collins 11-30-2010 12:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chad Cilli (Post 83561)
It's stronger now compared to pre-surgery, but how does it compare to your other shoulder? Is it on equal footing or is it still your weaker shoulder?

I guess I haven't put much thought into that. It's hard to say..

Strength wise tt's definitely a little bit weaker in some lifts, but thats probably normal since it is my non-dominant shoulder? Like In getups its probably 5lbs weaker and 5-10lbs weaker in a dumbbell row.

In other areas it's better because it doesn't hurt after I do some things, my right shoulder sometimes will bother me a bit probably for some of the same reason I needed my left operated on...I blame years of videogames, basketball, baseball, and winter time surfing. I didn't pay much attention to how I was treating my body and no one told me I was doing wrong unfortunately.

Mentally I don't consider it my weaker shoulder for those reasons although I guess technically it is somewhat weaker, but more stable. Although comparing it to an "injured" shoulder isn't apples to apples... So maybe it is significantly weaker. I need to go lift.


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