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-   -   Snatch Help (http://www.catalystathletics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7146)

Graham Haug 08-13-2013 06:54 PM

Snatch Help
 
Hello, long time reader, first time poster. Have been endeavoring to become more proficient at the olympic lifts and lifting in general. Use the lifts as strength/speed building tools for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

I weigh 180 lbs, am 6'0, and have been lifting now for somewhere around 3 months. Max snatch is a 170 lb and max C&J is 265, performed recently. I think my snatch can be much better but is being hampered probably by a weak overhead position and bad hip/ankle mobility, but hopefully I can work on these and other things pending critique response.

I appreciate your time and input and can take other videos of near-maximal loads, different angles, failed lifts, etc, if need be. Heading to Austin, TX probably next Friday to work with Oleg Kechko of OK Weightlifting (I live in San Antonio. He seems to be the only "legit" coach around, according to research/word of mouth, and will be my first in-person coaching of any kind..looking forward to it, but could use some pointers to work on before heading out there).

Both lifts are 135lbs:


Keith Miller 08-14-2013 08:10 AM

I would try and slow down the first pull, you're getting onto your toes too early and it's pulling you forward getting under the bar.

As for coaches, you might also look up Ursula, I think she's in the Austin or San Antonio area. Chad Vaughn also coaches out of that area. I know Ursula has trained the coaches at 210 crossfit, so that might be an avenue also. Nothing against Oleg, he's a good guy and a good coach, just wanted to give you some options.

Graham Haug 08-14-2013 11:10 AM

Thanks, Keith. I had no idea Vaughn was in Texas. I have admired his lifts on youtube for some time. Looks like he works at a place a little North of Austin, next time I head that way I'll try to stop in. I'm into finding as much knowledge as I can.

As far as slowing down that first pull, is that a habit I want to get into as the weight increases, or can I just address it by keeping the speed but working a bit more on keeping those heels driving as long as possible?

Tamara Reynolds 08-14-2013 01:05 PM

We like for our lifters to be able to work up to close to 90% of their max with a super slow pull. Especially with beginners, almost every time they get on their toes, they could have avoided it simply by slowing down their pull.

Graham Haug 08-15-2013 07:59 PM

Taking both of your words of advice, I did a snatch workout today focusing on super slow pulls. Worked up to a 176 snatch (a previous PR for me) very easily and decided to go for the 186, which has been a goal for some time. The pull on this is much faster than my previous lifts of the night, but it felt good going up. I think I'm able to get under the bar a little more balanced due to not toeing so much.

This video is the 186 lb attempt, featuring a clumsy escape from the failed lockout. Got it up no problem but the overhead position, whether due to weakness or confidence (I was picturing Matthias Steiner prior to the go, probably not a good idea in hindsight), didn't lock and my foot went wonky.



As far as strengthening the overhead position, specifically the moment of lockout, is there anything other than snatch balances or drop snatches that I should be specifically focusing on in technique training? As far as confidence in the lockout goes (I feel like the above lift was mine and I sissied out), I guess just working with close to but still sub maximal (like 85-90% heavy singles) is a good idea?

Thanks again.

Ben McClure 08-16-2013 07:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tamara Reynolds (Post 100400)
We like for our lifters to be able to work up to close to 90% of their max with a super slow pull. Especially with beginners, almost every time they get on their toes, they could have avoided it simply by slowing down their pull.

I agree, I treat the first pull as a primer for the real momentum coming from the explosive second pull. All you wanna do is get the bar moving in the right path, and get the bar into the hip so you can really drive the bar up and get under fast. A fast first pull will just lead to not being able to control the second pull and will usually end up humping the bar forward and creating a huge loop in the bar path.

Tamara Reynolds 08-16-2013 08:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Graham Haug (Post 100409)
Taking both of your words of advice, I did a snatch workout today focusing on super slow pulls. Worked up to a 176 snatch (a previous PR for me) very easily and decided to go for the 186, which has been a goal for some time. The pull on this is much faster than my previous lifts of the night, but it felt good going up. I think I'm able to get under the bar a little more balanced due to not toeing so much.

This video is the 186 lb attempt, featuring a clumsy escape from the failed lockout. Got it up no problem but the overhead position, whether due to weakness or confidence (I was picturing Matthias Steiner prior to the go, probably not a good idea in hindsight), didn't lock and my foot went wonky.



As far as strengthening the overhead position, specifically the moment of lockout, is there anything other than snatch balances or drop snatches that I should be specifically focusing on in technique training? As far as confidence in the lockout goes (I feel like the above lift was mine and I sissied out), I guess just working with close to but still sub maximal (like 85-90% heavy singles) is a good idea?

Thanks again.

Watching that miss in slo-mo, you basically got the bar behind you without ever having your elbows locked. Nice bail, though.

We prioritize aggression on the lockout over everything else... because if you don't lockout, you cannot make the lift. Whereas, you can do all sorts of funky things at the hip and the floor and still have a legal and safe lockout. To drill that, I like having lifters use a weight that is maybe 80% of max and just focus on speed from the hip to lockout. Their entire goal is to be faster from the hip to lockout than they thought possible.

We don't really use snatch balances or drop snatches for that purpose simply because it's a different motion... the bar is already behind you and you don't have to pull it into place.

If someone had shoulder stability or strength issues that were impacting lockout, then I'd do some other things, but unless you tell me you are constantly dropping snatches on your head, I don't think that's a problem for you.

I am not saying that this necessarily would have helped in this situation, but I'd tell you to make smaller jumps once you get to PR weights. Jumping from 176 to 186 is over 5%, which is a big deal on the snatch when you're at max weights.


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