Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Endurance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-23-2007, 08:12 PM   #21
Robert Allison
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 245
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
I would expect as much variability in frame size in pre-paleo folks as there is in the current crop of hominids based on climate as much as anything.
That's pretty much where I was going. When looking at contemporary hunter-gathers (when & where still extant), there are size variations, depending on environment and resource availability. The same is true when we look at the archeological record.

Quote:
My thinking was that muscles are calorically expensive...
Good observation. One might make the case that how the muscles were used might justify the "expense," but, in any case, I tend to think it would be rare to find musculature comparable to that of a modern strength athlete.

Great conversation.
Robert Allison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2007, 06:01 PM   #22
Neal Winkler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 326
Default

Well, the little I've looked into it so far, I think the average HG from the upper paleolithic was about 5'9" and 156lbs. But I seen another study that showed extrapolation of body mass from the skeletons seems to be underestimated by about 9%.
Neal Winkler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2007, 06:06 PM   #23
Steve Liberati
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ
Posts: 459
Default

Impeccable timing (or mabe Art was inspired by our thread?)

http://www.arthurdevany.com/2007/04/..._as_runne.html
__________________
100,000 generations of humans have been hunters and gatherers; 500 generations have been agriculturalists; ten have lived in the industrial age; and only one has been exposed to the world of computers.

Steve's Club
Crossfit Tribe
Steve Liberati is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2007, 06:56 AM   #24
Robb Wolf
Senior Member
 
Robb Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,444
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
I would expect as much variability in frame size in pre-paleo folks as there is in the current crop of hominids based on climate as much as anything.

My thinking was that muscles are calorically expensive, being big (fat or meaty) is rarely a positive when you are paying(hunting) your own food.
Dave-
both devany and cordain have mentioned less variation in height among HG's, due most likely o similar food supply and thus similar phenotypic expression.
__________________
"Survival will be neither to the strongest of the species, nor to the most intelligent, but to those most adaptable to change."
C. Darwin

Robb's Blog
Robb Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2007, 07:17 AM   #25
Robert Allison
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 245
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robb Wolf View Post
Dave-
both devany and cordain have mentioned less variation in height among HG's, due most likely o similar food supply and thus similar phenotypic expression.
Do DeVany and Cordain mention any variations in weight? Also, was the lack of variation in height derived from a study of current day H-Gs, or on evidence from the archeological record?

Just curious...
Robert Allison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2007, 10:53 AM   #26
Dave Van Skike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,738
Default

Interesting. I need to look back at the comparison of som of the earlier homnids like to robustus to see what the size differenfce is attributed to there.

The vany article is interesting in it's own way.
__________________
Practical Strength
Dave Van Skike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2007, 04:43 PM   #27
Robb Wolf
Senior Member
 
Robb Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,444
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Allison View Post
Do DeVany and Cordain mention any variations in weight? Also, was the lack of variation in height derived from a study of current day H-Gs, or on evidence from the archeological record?

Just curious...
Robert-
Not sure on any of that...I will try to follow up but I've been buried of late...just going from memory!
__________________
"Survival will be neither to the strongest of the species, nor to the most intelligent, but to those most adaptable to change."
C. Darwin

Robb's Blog
Robb Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2007, 09:22 AM   #28
James Evans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: London
Posts: 594
Default Running on 2 legs more efficient

This is an interesting suggestion but is ultimately hypothesis.

All you Creationist CrossFitters look away now.

I take this to mean that we evolved on to two legs for this reason. Correct me if I misunderstand.

There are many theories for why we are two legged (originally) none of which are fully proved. These include diverse ideas such as the move away from arboreal habitats (ie the motherf*ckin' jungle) left us more exposed to the sun and upright stance reduces this or another theory that our early ancestors where semi-marine in nature and being bipedal assisted them in foraging along the shore (quite contraversial that one).

Ultimately the suggestion is that tool manipulation came later.


Dr Mike Stroud's 'Survival of the Fittest' is a very good read on this subject and indeed on others (including endurance, rhabdo and nutrition).
James Evans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2007, 09:38 AM   #29
Garrett Smith
Senior Member
 
Garrett Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,368
Default

I get so tired of people saying that our bipedal design is inherently "flawed" and that's why we have back problems, etc.

It's people getting fat and lazy that's the problem.

And no, I don't believe the desire to "exercise" is natural. The need to exercise is a byproduct of our ability to create things that take away nearly all need for manual labors in our daily lives. Combine fat, lazy, and disjointed exercise approaches (ie. BBing and machine hamster-wheel cardio) and you've got a big human mess.
__________________
Garrett Smith NMD CSCS BS, aka "Dr. G"
RepairRecoverRestore.com - Blood, Saliva, and Stool Testing
My radio show - The Path to Strength and Health
Garrett Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2007, 10:51 AM   #30
R. Alan Hester
Senior Member
 
R. Alan Hester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 290
Default

What do you think of these yahoos. I am sure you have seen this before, but it seems to fit into this conversation. maybe?
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...all_fours.html
R. Alan Hester is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:01 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator