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Old 09-06-2007, 09:24 AM   #21
Mark Joseph Limbaga
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Bin-F'n-Go.....Well put and can't stress that enough....as your best advertising is someone walking around 30lbs lighter and when people ask what they did....well then you have people calling you day and night....Find your niche...whether it be sports performance....fat loss (huge enough market there) and become an expert at getting results. Forget all the fads and trends of core balance ball cone drills that all the junk certs and equipment company seminars are forcing on the average trainer...learn the effective ways to get results in your niche market and just do it.
Its funny since I have a lot of peers in the industry down here who haven't produced results for clients and others have several certifications yet they don't even look like they workout.

For the coaches out there and those aspiring to be coaches, remember these words: GETTING RESULTS, ISN'T EVERYTHING, ITS THE ONLY THING!!!

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1) The Fat loss market is reaching $1 Billion in revenue....if you are a personal trainer and not focusing on it you are a f***'ing idiot....

2) If you want to make alot of money in this industry you need to do 2 things:
a) Charge alot (dont try and be cheap on your rates)
b) Be a prick (dont try and be people's friends, get them results)
1) definitely true. The number o out of shape individuals are increasing in the number daily

2
a) though I agree with this, charge fair, if you know yourself and are confident of your capabilities, charge as much as you can.... Always state more than your going rate since some clients will negotiate at times
b) Stop trying to be Mary Poppins.. Be a coach for crying out loud! (sadly others forget this and spoil their clients)
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Old 09-06-2007, 09:30 AM   #22
Mike ODonnell
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Its funny since I have a lot of peers in the industry down here who haven't produced results for clients and others have several certifications yet they don't even look like they workout.
unfortunately I know exactly what you mean....personally I have no issues if the trainer actually knows what he is doing and can still get results for his clients....unfortunately the training industry as a whole is a sham.....more business orientated for profit and less on getting people the truth and results. Personally I am sick of it and now soon will be calling out everyone in the industry for their blantant lies and lack of professional responsibility to the public.....should be fun!

My next book will be "Get your Fat Client off the Bosu ball....as their Core is not the issue!!"

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a) though I agree with this, charge fair, if you know yourself and are confident of your capabilities, charge as much as you can.... Always state more than your going rate since some clients will negotiate at times
It's funny....I see trainers whoring themselves out for $20/hour....but then again many are worth less than that. If a person tries and price shop me I laugh....and tell them to go ahead and try the other trainer for a month, and then try me....if I don't get them better results they get a full refund. Also I have found the more I charge (while still affordable but not average), the more people value my time and will listen to me. I'm moving more into coaching full time anyways and not going to sit there and count reps....that's the job for a $15/hr trainer.
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Old 09-06-2007, 12:02 PM   #23
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Mike,

If there's one thing I do envy you guys out there is that with my level right no, our head coach says I can charge 100$ an hour easily, yet sadly I can't do it here.

The only thing I'm proud of is here in our gym, I've so far produced the best results among all of us here. The funny thing is, I don't charge that high, but my clients are now realizing that my worth is more than what they pay for.

A client of mine jokingly said that i have "Turned a 28 year old trapped in a 40 year old body into a his real age"

My newest projects are a 30 year old yuppie who is badly out of shape and wants to get fit as he is getting maried soon and wants to start a family, two Chinese brothers who want to improve their sports performance.

How are your clients so far?
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Old 09-06-2007, 12:25 PM   #24
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Mike,

If there's one thing I do envy you guys out there is that with my level right no, our head coach says I can charge 100$ an hour easily, yet sadly I can't do it here.
I completely understand how you may not be able to get that kind of money depending on location. I would look into what kind of program you can do for a small group of 3-4 maybe. So if you are only able to charge $30/session....then figure a way to charge $20/session and have a group of 4-5....that way you can maximize you potential revenue per hour to $100/hr. Remember you can make the rules, so tell people that you only do small groups....and it's one flat rate, and then as your results start to show....people will be lining up at the door to train with you! For the average weight loss client (which most are for me) the training is really easy....it's the nutritional adherence you have to make sure they stick to. Best part is...you still get all the credit even though weight loss is 85%+ diet!! Just get a system in place that yields results while also maximizing your revenue per hour (or session).
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Old 09-08-2007, 10:08 AM   #25
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I completely understand how you may not be able to get that kind of money depending on location. I would look into what kind of program you can do for a small group of 3-4 maybe. So if you are only able to charge $30/session....then figure a way to charge $20/session and have a group of 4-5....that way you can maximize you potential revenue per hour to $100/hr. Remember you can make the rules, so tell people that you only do small groups....and it's one flat rate, and then as your results start to show....people will be lining up at the door to train with you! For the average weight loss client (which most are for me) the training is really easy....it's the nutritional adherence you have to make sure they stick to. Best part is...you still get all the credit even though weight loss is 85%+ diet!! Just get a system in place that yields results while also maximizing your revenue per hour (or session).

I actually figured out how to train groups with less effort. I give them a package rate and I get an assistant from one of our assistant coaches/apprentices and just give him a small cut from my fee just to have him be the one to demonstrate, load/strip weights, help me stretch while i oversee the training, update programs.

Did this with two brothers who train at the same time, I'll keep doing this so in the future, I'll br atraining more people yet I won't be as tired as I don't want to have my work up to my neck as i still work 55 hours a week in the gym, excluding my consultancy work fr market research, i gotta have a life too :P
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Old 09-20-2007, 10:46 PM   #26
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Good thread. I am kind in the same boat as well, i realize training is something i have a passion for and i enjoy trying to help others. I am working towards giving it a shot as a career. I have worked in IT for the past five years since i have been out of college, and while i am grateful that i have been to make a living and save up some money, i am pretty tired of it.

My plan is to get a nationally recognized cert first, and start trying to get some experience, hopefully working a gym on the side so i can keep my day job for a bit. I would try to get my Crossfit cert not long after this, and then see from there. I do Brazillian Juijitsu, and one of the main reasons i got so excited about CF style training was that it helped me so much on the mat. If i could somehow eventually train some Jits guys or wrestlers that would be pretty cool.

I live in Portland, OR, and Scott Hagnas of Crossfit Portland has been really generous with his time, getting together with me on occasion to talk about training, how to get started, etc. I would not be adverse to just getting some experience in a box gym if i felt i would learn something and not just have to use their pre formatted workout templates.

I am curious how much trainers at the box gyms make on avg. One place i called said you can expect to make low $30K's when starting.



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Old 09-21-2007, 09:09 AM   #27
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I am curious how much trainers at the box gyms make on avg. One place i called said you can expect to make low $30K's when starting.
Try $15-$20/hr if you are lucky. As most big gyms now subcontract out PT services to PT companies....who will take 40-60% of the revenue or pay you a flat fee based on experience. Remember you make money per hour...and unless your gym is just feeding you tons of clients...you may only be working a couple hours a day and need to go bug members to try and sign up. I'm not a fan of that style of selling, but do what you need to do to get the experience. Keep your day job....do PT on the side (as your prime hours are before and after work anyways)....as it is a tough business to keep full time for a long time....lots of peaks and valleys.
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Old 09-21-2007, 10:32 AM   #28
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Yea, that is kind of what i figured. I went and interviewed at 24 HR fitness a while ago, just to get a better idea of what a trainer at that type of gym does. With a cert you get $15/hr while training the clients, minimum wage if you are not training. I think the most you can make per hour is $22, and that is with three or four certifications. Doesnt really sound like the ideal place to work, i dont know how i would like going around trying to sell personal training packages to gym members.

I am going to keep my day job at least for the short term future, but i am going to try my best at making the personal training thing work. There quite a few mom and pop gyms and personal training studios here in Portland, perhaps some of them might be a better place to get experience. I think at the smaller places if you are working as a contractor the split is more your favor. One gym i talked to it was 80/20, which seems pretty good. But then there is still the aspect of getting clients unless the gym feeds them to you.

I think the Crossfit path is probably the most satisfying one, though perhaps a bit slower to start. Plus there are already two affiliates here in town, i dont know that trying to start a third one would make much sense.

I guess the bottom line is i need to find a good way to get some experience, and then see where it takes me.


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Old 09-21-2007, 10:38 AM   #29
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The smaller owned gyms are the way to go...as you either do a 70/30...80/20 or if you get enough clients pay a flat monthly rent. It's still up to you on how to get clients....my personal opinion is that there are 10000000 personal trainers out there....don't try and be one of them, find a niche and be the expert then people will come to you....whether it is fat loss....sports specific training....fitness for golfers....etc..etc..etc. The general fitness trainer is a dime a dozen and will keep you making little money....while a specialty trainer can charge a higher premium. All in all.....it's a learning experience and the only way to learn is to just get out there and do it. Best of luck!
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Old 05-21-2010, 04:20 PM   #30
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Yep, this thread is ancient but my question to those who responded to the OP is directly related to the thread. To those of you who answered with advice to the OP:
1) Assuming that you chose to become professionals in the fitness industry because you enjoy the field of fitness: Do you still enjoy it now that you've had some time to find that, after all, it is work and something you have to work at every day if you want to succeed?
2) If you answered positively to #1, what in particular do you find satisfying and worthwhile about what you do each day?
Thanks in advance for any particular examples you could provide...
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