Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Flexibility, Training Preparation & Recovery

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-17-2008, 12:14 PM   #11
Dave Van Skike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,738
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
Like already discoursed about...animals stretch usually after being sedentary...which according to my dogs is an all day event....but then again I've seen her go from laying asleep to a full sprint to chase a squirell and never came up short holding her hammies....

Anyways....stretching before workouts/sports I would never recommend as you are creating muscle tears and will most likely reduce performance and increase risk of injury due to joint instability and muscle imbalances....active warmups with increasing dynamic movements to increase ROM & body temperature and quick burst of movement to increase CNS activation...I would always suggest.

In the end...if you pull a muscle chances are it's not solely because of tightness but antagonistic muscle imbalances that create the issue in the first place.

Isn't it a matter of degrees Mike? I know a lot of people find a combo of mobilty work and light streching to be essential to their warm up. I lean a little more towards the mobilty side of things but I a lot of big guys aI know, 285 plus, really see to thrive on actual static strechting. I know the recent scienctificals may suggest otherwise but I see it work for a lot of people in varying degrees.
__________________
Practical Strength
Dave Van Skike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2008, 12:23 PM   #12
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
Isn't it a matter of degrees Mike? I know a lot of people find a combo of mobilty work and light streching to be essential to their warm up. I lean a little more towards the mobilty side of things but I a lot of big guys aI know, 285 plus, really see to thrive on actual static strechting. I know the recent scienctificals may suggest otherwise but I see it work for a lot of people in varying degrees.
Of course it is all matter of degrees. I would even bet there is a direct relationship to increased amount of muscle to increase in muscle tightness....kind of like more muscle means more tension and forces applied to any movement....which could also translate into more chance of injury as directly proportional to the increased force output of those muscles. But that is not to say that a person may not also be deficient in Magnesium which helps muscles to relax, dehydrated, or overtrained so muscles are not recovered 100%. There are alot of individualistic qualities to it.

In the end...the old saying goes...if it works for you....stick with it. That and there is no down side to yoga if the class is all women in tights.
__________________
Fitness Spotlight
The IF Life
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 07:56 AM   #13
Tom Rawls
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 152
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
I would even bet there is a direct relationship to increased amount of muscle to increase in muscle tightness....kind of like more muscle means more tension and forces applied to any movement....
That sounds like the old theory that if you lift weights you get "muscle bound."
Tom Rawls is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 08:33 AM   #14
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Rawls View Post
That sounds like the old theory that if you lift weights you get "muscle bound."
Who knows...but I personally notice less injuries of pulled muscles over the years playing sports directionally proportional to the leaner I am and the less I workout. Could also be due to improved dietary intake (and also less calories w/ IF) and less inflammation as well.
__________________
Fitness Spotlight
The IF Life
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 09:19 AM   #15
Eric Kerr
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 39
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
Like already discoursed about...animals stretch usually after being sedentary...which according to my dogs is an all day event....but then again I've seen her go from laying asleep to a full sprint to chase a squirell and never came up short holding her hammies....

I think this is at least partially because animals don't suffer from over thinking.

If they decide they are going to do something they do it full on. Which is why pound per pound, animals seem so much stronger than humans. They don't hold back.

Unlike humans which think about things like watching the ground to make sure they don't step in hole, or how dinner last night is sitting a little awkwardly, or a myriad of other inconsequential things that result in mind and body getting out of sync.
Eric Kerr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 09:28 AM   #16
John Alston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: tidy bowl man's apt.
Posts: 1,121
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Kerr View Post
I think this is at least partially because animals don't suffer from over thinking.

If they decide they are going to do something they do it full on. Which is why pound per pound, animals seem so much stronger than humans.
They are stronger. To look at our closest genetic relatives, the smaller chimps, they are stronger, simply due to more powerful muscles. Their muscles can produce more force, their tendons can handle it, and there is no psychological element to enter in.
Hominids chose the smart but slower, weaker route evolutionarily.
Quote:
It's a lot easier to get a chimp in roller skates than it is to get him to pump iron--hence, most of the data on chimp strength is anecdotal and decidedly unscientific.
In tests at the Bronx Zoo in 1924, a dynamometer--a scale that measures the mechanical force of a pull on a spring--was erected in the monkey house. A 165-pound male chimpanzee named "Boma" registered a pull of 847 pounds, using only his right hand (although he did have his feet braced against the wall, being somewhat hip, in his simian way, to the principles of leverage). A 165-pound man, by comparison, could manage a one-handed pull of about 210 pounds.
Even more frightening, a female chimp, weighing a mere 135 pounds and going by the name of Suzette, checked in with a one-handed pull of 1,260 pounds. (She was in a fit of passion at the time; one shudders to think what her boyfriend must have looked like next morning.) In dead lifts, chimps have been known to manage weights of 600 pounds without even breaking into a sweat. A male gorilla could probably heft an 1,800-pound weight and not think twice about it.
__________________
"Morning, Putski eats it, noon, Putski eats it, night, Putski eats it. Putski loves!"
John Alston is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:19 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator