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Old 05-08-2008, 04:44 AM   #11
Darryl Shaw
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Darryl:

Sprinting WILL do the job for aerobic fitness *IF* the rest times are kept down. I'm not sure if you know much about the anaerobic vs. aerobic but as the sprinting volume drags on it will be more and more aerobic for energy.

I still recommend 400-800m intervals though. Those will rape you. HIIT is better for aerobic conditioning (provided enough volume but still less time than longer dirance running) than steady state running anyway. Well, at least for beginning and intermediate runners looking for aerobic conditioning + fat burn. One of the studies I looked at for HIIT vs. steady state showed that at 1/3 of the time for HIIT training (so for example, 20 minutes HIIT & 60 minutes steady state work) they had the same markers of fatty acid metabolism when all was said and done.

That's generally why metcon/hiit/tabata can complete with aerobic running in times for beginner and intermediate runners because they are significantly aerobic as the volume rises.
I agree with you that sprinting and lactate threshold training will get the job done faster than LSD training and I'm sure that the OP could go straight out and start doing 400 - 800m intervals today but the training volume required to see significant results would destroy his knees. This is why I sugested a slow and steady approach of building up aerobic conditioning on a bike, which will also strengthen his knees, while he gets his weight down to a level where he can run without too much risk of injury.
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Old 05-08-2008, 06:12 AM   #12
Steven Low
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Agree and disagree. 2x400m is more than enough to start off with. But agree with building up volume on something non-impact first (and learning good run technique).
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Old 05-08-2008, 06:52 AM   #13
Mike ODonnell
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It's amazing how much easier it is to run....with less lbs on you. I am sure you are focusing on nutrition...but remember that is where you get most of your weight loss. The conditioning will come. If the test is running...then you will have to run. Biking can help, but to be honest...I can bike no problems but then when I run it just doesn't transition well for me. So to be better at running....I run. Personally I like the 400-800 meter repeats approach if you are doing a mile test....worked for me in the past (800 m runs are the worst possible thing in my book....just long enough to make it hurt....just short enough not to get into a rythm)
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Old 05-08-2008, 09:50 AM   #14
Dave Van Skike
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Agree and disagree. 2x400m is more than enough to start off with. But agree with building up volume on something non-impact first (and learning good run technique).
Is this a suggestion in general or are is anyone actually suggesting that our friend Larry here to go click off a couple 400m repeats?

I'm going to just take a stab in the dark...

Suggetions of this type may be coming from people who weigh no more than a buck seventy five, let alone two seventy-five...
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Old 05-08-2008, 01:29 PM   #15
Steven Low
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Is this a suggestion in general or are is anyone actually suggesting that our friend Larry here to go click off a couple 400m repeats?

I'm going to just take a stab in the dark...

Suggetions of this type may be coming from people who weigh no more than a buck seventy five, let alone two seventy-five...
lol, you're too much. -_-

In general. I've already agreed with you guys that it's a bit much on the knees at this point in his weight AND apologized as such. Although you need very little volume for results for newer people if they're sprints with good technique. THAT is what I'm getting at.
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Old 05-08-2008, 01:47 PM   #16
Dave Van Skike
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Although you need very little volume for results for newer people if they're sprints with good technique. THAT is what I'm getting at.
what results are you speaking of?
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Old 05-08-2008, 07:20 PM   #17
Steven Low
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Alright, NEVERMIND.

Disregard everything of what I've said here.
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Old 05-08-2008, 07:52 PM   #18
Mike ODonnell
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Let's all play nice...we are here to help out and while people disagree, personal attacks will not be tolerated. This thread will be shut down if it continues down that road.

With that in mind, we all have our opinions..Larry you can improve some cardio endurance with heavy compound lifting complexes and other types of exertion such as bilking or rowing...but if you have to run in your job and test, one would assume "moderate" amounts of running training would be recommended...not only for the test...but also for your livelyhood and potential safety as a law officer as well. Losing weight goes a long way to helping someone have less stress while they run to reduce chances of injury and increase performance. One can modify the lengths, intensity and rest periods....and I would always say go slow and ramp up little by little with whatever protocol you are training at....as going full sprint out of the gate and injuring oneself is never a good idea.

Larry sounds like you still have a ways to go (Sept being the final test?). So weight loss, lifting complexes, nutrition and moderate cardio intervals are a good plan. If running hurts right now....then find an alternate as you can always walk and diet down the lbs and get the endurance up later.

If you are concerned about knee health, most issues are related to quad/ham muscle imbalances/weaknesses. So squatting ROM is a good place to start. (start light and work up). I would say also working unilateral in general is good, but keep in mind your bw is pretty heavy so the stress is going to be much more than an avg person. I would start with assisted bodyweight lunges (no additional weights needed) and work it slow and controlled. Again...I don't know your current level of fitness or ROM (as I can't see it in person)...so much of this take with caution and always start off slow. Alot of hamstring injury issues can also be traced back to pelvis/hip instability issues (aka keep your...sigh I hate to say it..."Core"...tight when lifting) and make sure your hip flexors are not overly tight (not in fact tight hamstrings...although it will help to keep them somewhat flexible if you have lower back pain). When in doubt....range of motion (aka muscle imbalance/tightness issues) should be addressed before needing to add weight.
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Last edited by Mike ODonnell : 05-08-2008 at 08:17 PM.
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Old 05-09-2008, 07:26 AM   #19
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don't take the lightweight comment as a personal attack, Steven...it's just an observation. a lot of regurgitated "current thinking" gets doled out to folks like Larry from people who have no practical experience with the situation. assuming it will yield some universally good "results."
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Old 05-09-2008, 11:32 AM   #20
Tom Rawls
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Larry,

Do you have access to a good rowing machine? The rower offers an excellent way to get in some high-intensity work or longer endurance sessions without beating the shit out of your knees.

Also, walking is good.
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