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Old 09-14-2008, 06:24 AM   #111
Scott Hanson
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Originally Posted by Liam Dougherty Springer View Post
I'd love to see comparitive srudies from different types of activity populations i.e. runners, matial arts, swimmers, Interval Trainers (pretty sure it would be extremely difficult to find very many elderly interval trainers but i could be wrong) Dancers, and weight lifters.

I wonder how many of the runners in these studies also did these activities as well? I guess what I am saying is is this a comparison between active and inactive elderly or active runners and active non runner elderly. It would make a big difference in evealuating whether the act of running itself not just a higher activity level had anything to do with the resistance to age related deterioration.
This may not be quite what you are looking for, but here is a study of Finnish elite athletes, with a ranking of longevity vs sport group (endurance, team, or power athletes). I didn't notice any data pertaining to how long these athletes continued their activity or what other activity they participated in, although as elite athletes its doubtful they did little if any athletic activity outside their specialties:

http://www.acsm-msse.org/pt/re/msse/abstract.00005768-199302000-00013.htm;jsessionid=LNThp0JfJCHwYYWGqjnhg7v9GFQph swLJdS7HjTp8JvGL32N9HDp!612563345!181195628!8091!-1

The conclusion: endurance athletes had the highest life expectancy.
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Old 09-14-2008, 03:16 PM   #112
Liam Dougherty Springer
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Thanx Scott, I have seen a study simmilar to this before however it seems that the athletes of endurence sports tend to contnue sports activity in there feild and in general a lot longer than those of the "power" sports. I suppose alot of the spescific training would have to give way to other activities as the body will experience significant were at their training loads in those sports. However for someone like myself or any athletes who do end up training at a lower capasity and in more variouse platforms after their "career" ends I have the feeling that the results on longevity may not be so clean cut. Maybe I am just in denial that a marrothon runner is doing a better job at ensuring a long healthy life than I am.
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Old 09-15-2008, 06:34 AM   #113
Darryl Shaw
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Darryl,
That's interesting about the Japanese, and good news to me (I'm 1/8 Japanese... not much, but with longevity being prevalent on both sides of my family something is working in my genes to extend lifespan).
Good genes might give you an edge over the rest of us but you shouldn't get too complacent about your diet and lifestyle because it appears that as Okinawans have adopted more of an American diet their life expectancy has dropped and the incidence of heart disease, cancer and diabetes has increased.

Metabolic Syndrome Impairs Longevity in Okinawa, Japan.

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Couple of questions though. How many of the centenarians are on Okinawa and what kind of population increase has Japan experienced in the last 40 years that centenarian population has increased?
I'm not sure if there have been any significant changes to the Japanese diet or lifestyle over the past 40 years that might have lead to the increased number of centenarians today. Perhaps improved medical care or the increased awareness of the link between salt and stomach cancer would explain some of the increase but todays centenarians would have been 60 back in 1968 so I suspect that if they were going to develop diabetes, cancer or heart disease they would have done so years ago. I can't find a detailed breakdown of the statistics relating to the number of centenarians in Japan vs Okinawa but I suspect that the high number of Okinawan centenarians might skew the statistics re. longevity somewhat in Japans favour.

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I think I remember seeing a post by Robb one time noting that the Okinawans eat less rice and soy and have a tuber similar to a sweet potato. Carbs aren't bad, empty ones like rice are though.
It is true that sweet potatoes (imo) used to be the Okinawans traditional staple carbohydrate and rice is a fairly recent addition to their diet but their overall diet is quite similar to that of mainland Japan in most other respects. They do eat a lot less salt than in mainland Japan though so they would have a lower incidence of stomach cancer and strokes but the main difference between Okinawa and mainland Japan is calorie intake; amongst those eating traditional diets the Japanese eat 20% fewer calories than Americans and Okinawans eat 10 - 20% fewer calories than in mainland Japan.

www.okicent.org
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Old 09-15-2008, 09:01 AM   #114
Derek Weaver
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Cool stuff Darryl.

Just for the record, I am anything but complacent about my food intake. Except when I'm trying to pack on weight I'm nearly monkish. Just to clear the air on that one.

Pretty interesting on the salt intake, hadn't really put much thought into that in the past.

Looks like another score for caloric restriction in the relationship between the Okinawans and mainlanders.
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Old 09-15-2008, 10:52 AM   #115
Jared Buffie
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FWIW, I read a Time article about centernarians in the summer of 2003 (I believe), and they made the point that there are 70,000 centernarians in America and it is the fastest growing demographic. If you can find it anywhere, it's a really interesting read.

The best quote from there was (paraphrasing):
"Most people think 'the older you get, the sicker you get'. But for centernarians, it's 'the older you get, the healthier you've been'".

Also, I've read the stats on the Okinawins and they have the same "high risk" and "low risk" genes that Americans have.

Doesn't add much to the conversation (I rarely do...)
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Old 09-16-2008, 05:34 AM   #116
Darryl Shaw
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Jared, I found the article you mentioned - interesting read.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...4967-1,00.html
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Old 09-28-2008, 05:37 PM   #117
Thomas Bailly
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I think it's the lower body weight of marathon runners that gives them a longer life than powerlifters. Less wear on the organs.
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Old 09-28-2008, 05:54 PM   #118
George Mounce
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I think it's the lower body weight of marathon runners that gives them a longer life than powerlifters. Less wear on the organs.
Could you explain the "wear on organs" thought more, I'm interested in what you are talking about, but I'm confused on exactly what you are getting at. Thanks!
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Old 09-28-2008, 08:03 PM   #119
Thomas Bailly
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I wish I could remember the source of what I'd read, it was pre internet( at least for me)
but was basically a paper that correlated body weight and longevity, if my non ginkoed memory serves me right the idea was that at rest a heavier person would put more demands on his heart,liver thyroid,etc than a lighter weight person.
One can assume that a 300 pound guy does not have a heart/liver/lungs twice the size of someone who weighs 150lb, therefore his internal organs do more work at rest. More work 24hrs a day= lower life span.
Again this was what I recall from something I read 10 years ago, I'm sorry I can't give any source or checking, but it would be interesting to look at longevity from a BW perspective of "fit "individuals.(disregard obesity and super thin extremes)

I wonder, how heavy are Okinawains?

any of you have any science on this topic?
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:43 AM   #120
Mike ODonnell
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Originally Posted by Thomas Bailly View Post
I wish I could remember the source of what I'd read, it was pre internet( at least for me)
but was basically a paper that correlated body weight and longevity, if my non ginkoed memory serves me right the idea was that at rest a heavier person would put more demands on his heart,liver thyroid,etc than a lighter weight person.
One can assume that a 300 pound guy does not have a heart/liver/lungs twice the size of someone who weighs 150lb, therefore his internal organs do more work at rest. More work 24hrs a day= lower life span.
Again this was what I recall from something I read 10 years ago, I'm sorry I can't give any source or checking, but it would be interesting to look at longevity from a BW perspective of "fit "individuals.(disregard obesity and super thin extremes)

I wonder, how heavy are Okinawains?

any of you have any science on this topic?
Sounds like going back to CR studies...the less you eat the longer you live. It's probably the case there, as larger people may eat more. (although fat can also put other pressure on the body like increased inflammation)....but in general just because a person is larger doesn't mean they put more stress on the organs just sitting around, as fat is just storage not doing much and no metabolic demands...it most likely comes down to what larger people eat. If a 300lb man eats meat and veggies...he is going to live longer than a 300lb man eating processed foods and sugars....fasting insulin is probably the best marker for long term health.
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