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Old 05-10-2009, 09:02 PM   #11
Patrick Donnelly
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Originally Posted by Allen Yeh View Post
Huh? If he's not making money then he should gain weight?
Sort of, but not exactly. Hm. I attempted to type out an explanation here, but wasn't able to come out with anything too coherent. (Sleepy.) My belief here is sort of along the lines of CrossFit's "general fitness is better than specialization," except:
1. In the case of elite athletes, specialization is obviously better, because it provides you with a job.
2. I don't like the recent CrossFit definition of "fitness," and would prefer to use the term "physical health."
3. It seems to me that it's easier to semi-specialize in strength without harming overall fitness/physical health, then it is to semi-specialize in endurance.
4. If you're not elite, you can still compete in your sport for the fun of it, obviously, but winning on a local/regional level shouldn't necessarily be a high priority if it could interfere with overall fitness/physical health, since generally, a decrease in physical health leads to a decrease in overall health (where that includes physical, social, mental, and spiritual components). Of course, for those people would see that prioritization of physical health as seriously interfering with with their enjoyment of life (which is part of overall health), then ignore what I'm saying and do what you want, since I'm not one of those people, and what I'm saying doesn't apply to you. (Well, it does in the way that overall health should be put first, but not in the way that I see physical health as playing into overall health.)

So, it's possible for an elite athlete to train in a way that wrecks is body in the long run, but still be healthy, because health encompasses more than just physical stuff. For example, he might have been very regretful for the rest of his life had he not gone for the opportunity to go pro in whatever sport he was in. It's also possible for a recreational athlete to feel the same way, but not as common, I don't think, because people don't generally take recreational sports as seriously, because, well... They're recreational. It seems to be that most of the ones who take it seriously are either elite, or at least trying to get there.

Bah, crap. I just typed out another long explanation. At least these one is semi-coherent.

Does anyone else ever find themselves spending upwards of 30 minutes on a single post (or email, or paragraph in an essay, or topic of mediation, etc.), or am I an oddball in this regard?
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Old 05-10-2009, 09:25 PM   #12
Dave Van Skike
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Patrick, I might be out of line but I take this kind of stuff a littel more seriously than I should so apologies up front.

I think you're bassackwards on several fronts.

first, there is nothing inherently unhealthy about being a gracile endurance athlete, certainly you can go too far but that's hardly seems the case here. The fact is, Steve is a master's athlete competing at a high level, He's comfortable with the sacrifices, No place of mine or yours to judge. Truth be told, the 200 pound plus guys are probably gonna die first anyway.

second..SFW?

If you want to pursue a goal, you gotta make some sacrifices. I support anybody who wants to do that. choosing to be "well rounded" is choosing to fail.

you want to be an ultra marathoner?
A huge fat PL squatting in triple ply gear?
Wrestle into your fifties with nasty cauliflower ear?
Take the required supplements to compete in bodybuilding or SM, PL or OL?
Get lasiks to improve your golf game?
Pre-emptive wrist surgery to reduce arm pump for motocross?

I support all of that. More power to em. I've had a couple shots a highish level athletics and after much sacrifice, several surgeries, and years of rehab, I realize I prefer to be a hack who likes to drink on the weekends, hang with my kids and stay employed. Those are the choices I've made and I've got nothing but HUGE respect for anyone else who's got the balls to make the choice to go after what they want..regardless of the sacrifice.
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:01 AM   #13
Patrick Donnelly
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Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
Patrick, I might be out of line but I take this kind of stuff a littel more seriously than I should so apologies up front.
No, not at all. Your post was fine. If anything, my original comment was out of line, somewhat ignorant of the situation, and unnecessary, and I apologize for that.
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:36 AM   #14
Frank Needham
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Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
I've had a couple shots a highish level athletics and after much sacrifice, several surgeries, and years of rehab, I realize I prefer to be a hack who likes to drink on the weekends, hang with my kids and stay employed. Those are the choices I've made and I've got nothing but HUGE respect for anyone else who's got the balls to make the choice to go after what they want..regardless of the sacrifice.
Life experience, no equal for it.
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Old 05-11-2009, 02:38 PM   #15
Steve Kaspar
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Default sandbag carry

well, i did my second sandbag carry today. i measured out 1 mile with my bike computer thats super accurate. i started from my garage, went down the street 1/4 mile, turned around and repeated till i got my mile in.
did 14:02. so i bettered my first time by 2 minutes.
another plus, is i weighed the sandbag, and it weighs 60#, not 50# like i thought..
on the negative side, my left calf was hurting, and gave me no push off power.
i have a problem with my calf, and it just wont get any better. i was a runner before i started bike racing, and had to give up running because of a foot injury that effected the calf. since 1990, i have a hard time walking more than a mile or so. it feels like someone stabs me in the calf with a knife. it knots up and i have to stop.
that wasnt the case last time or today, but there is no pushoff power.
an injury that requires sugery that a few dr.'s told me... but i sure aint getting cut on.
bottom line, not sure if i should keep trying to better my time in the mile with my 60#, or add weight and dont worry about the time, just cover the distance. i tried jogging a few times since 1990, and build up to a mile and the calf gives out.
funny how the body is. i was running 4:19 when for the mile when i was 34 , now i cant even walk a mile without problems..
injuries suck..
but if i do this exercise 1 day a week, i have 6 days to recover..

opinions?
thanks
steve kaspar
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